Maharashtra Education News

Mumbai autorickshaw driver stuns passenger by naming all countries in Europe and more. Watch
The Indian Express | 1 hour ago | |
The Indian Express
1 hour ago | |

One should never judge a person by their profession or milieu. One often equates knowledge with people in high-paying jobs. However, a man driving an autorickshaw left his passenger stunned by his vast knowledge about a lot of things.A man named Rajiv Krishna shared how he was stuck in Mumbai’s infamous traffic when his driver initiated a conversation with him. Sensing that he was getting restless as he was close to his destination, the auto-driver started asking him which countries he has been to. To his utter surprise, he told him that he knows all the 44 countries in Europe. He then started rattling the names of all 44 countries in near alphabetical order. He then followed it up by naming the presidents and prime ministers of the prominent countries in Europe.“Being a native of Sindhudurg, Maharashtra, he went on to name all 35 districts of his home state. Not just that, he went on to name all 33 districts of Gujarat and all 75 districts of UP,” the caption explained. The driver then proceeded to educate him on the highlights of demonetisation, the 2G scandal and the Panama papers.“The man is named Ramdev and he is 61 years of age. He drives his rickshaw around for 8-9 hours a day just to keep himself active,” says the caption. The most surprising element of the conversation was when he got to know that he never received formal education as his family could only afford two meals a day.“All the knowledge that he had gained was through self study. He taught himself the alphabet, numbers and was blessed with the uncanny ability to retain vast amounts of information. In a parallel universe he could have been a professor with a doctorate at a top tier University,” Krishna wrote.Watch the video below:  A post shared by Rajiv Krishna (@krish_rajiv)Posted on November 7, the clip has received more than 3.82 lakh views.“I loved the way you worded the story. This video and your caption both warmed my heart,” commented a user. “Call him for your upsc exam centre ride for a quick revision,” said another. “Moments like these really humble us, the education we take for granted is a privilege that most others can only dream of,” another netizen wrote.

Mumbai autorickshaw driver stuns passenger by naming all countries in Europe and more. Watch
Patna Women’s College collaborates with premier institutions
Times of India | 2 days ago | |
Times of India
2 days ago | |

PATNA: Patna Women’s College (PWC), an autonomous college under Patna University, has created a record of sorts by fostering academic collaboration with nearly two dozen institutions across the country this year. No other institution of the state has signed MoUs with such a large number of institutions in such a short period. Giving details of these collaborations, the dean of PWC’s centre for national, international collaboration and consultancy services (NICCS), Alok John, said with a view to expanding its academic horizon the college has initiated establishing linkages with premier institutions of the country and abroad in the field of collaborative studies and research. Primarily, all these collaborations are aimed at facilitating students’ and teachers’ exchange, collaborative research and publications, cultural exchange and sharing of common resources and expertise in the fields of consultancy, accreditation and ranking, institutional benchmarking and best practices, said John. He pointed out that at a programme initiated by the Xavier Board of Higher Education India held some time back in Kerala, PWC signed MoU with as many as 17 institutions at a time. Since then, several advancements have been made among all these institutions in areas of some meaningful academic programmes. John said the collaboration between institutions offers a number of benefits, including opportunities to interact with researchers having expertise in a needed area of the proposed investigation, gain access to needed resources including databases, equipment, staff, and study populations and gain credibility through the name recognition from prominent researchers, departments, or institutions. In addition, many times, resources found lacking at one institution can be shared with a collaborating institution and vice versa, he said. The institutions with which PWC has started collaboration in different fields include Christ College, Irinjalakuda, Kerala; Christ (Deemed to be University) Bangalore; Fatima College (Autonomous), Madurai, Tamil Nadu; Holy Cross College (Autonomous), Tiruchirappalli, Tamil Nadu; Little Flower Degree and PG College, Uppal, Telangana; Loreto College, Kolkata, West Bengal; Loyola Academy, Secunderabad, Telangana; Mount Carmel College (Autonomous), Bengaluru, Karnataka; Providence Women’s College, Kozhikode, Kerala; Salesian College, Sonada-Siliguri, West Bengal; St. Teresa’s (Autonomous) College, Ernakulam, Kerala; St. Albert’s College, Ernakulam, Kerala; St. Ann’s college for women, Mehdipatnam, Telangana; St. Anthony’s College, Shillong, Meghalaya; St. Joseph’s College (Autonomous), Tiruchirappalli, Tamil Nadu; St. Joseph’s College, Irinjalakuda, Kerala; St. Xavier’s College (Autonomous), Mumbai, Maharashtra; Sophia Girls’ College, Ajmer; St. Aloysius College (Autonomous) Jabalpur; and St. Ann’s College of Education, Mangalore Vimala College (Autonomous), Thrissur, Kerala. PWC will be signing MoU with some more institutions soon, he added.

Patna Women’s College collaborates with premier institutions
UGC draft norms on fixed term for Chancellor, mandatory corpus amount irk deemed-to-be varsities
The Indian Express | 3 days ago | |
The Indian Express
3 days ago | |

Some of the draft regulations issued by the University Grants Commission (UGC) for deemed-to-be universities earlier this month have not gone down well with the institutions. The regulations include keeping a tab on fee structures of various courses and prohibiting donation or capitation fee, and making it mandatory for these universities to keep a considerable corpus fund aside, to be used for development purposes.As per the draft regulations, any donation or capitation fee is strictly prohibited, and the fee structure should be in accordance with the guidelines by the relevant statutory body. The fee should be fixed transparently keeping in view non-profiteering. According to the new draft, the deemed-to-be universities are also expected to set aside a corpus fund of Rs 25 crore, or an amount decided by the Commission from time to time.The norm that has attracted the most criticism is about the fixed tenure of the Chancellor, which should be for a maximum period of five years, and no reappointment. “The Chancellor of the institute in case of deemed-to-be universities is the soul of the institute, being the founder. Fixing the tenure will not really serve the purpose,” said Prof Dr G Viswanathan, founder and chancellor of Vellore Institute of Technology (VIT) and president of the Education Promotion Society for India (EPSI), a national consortium of private institutions imparting education, including deemed-to-be universities. The EPSI has submitted its representation to the UGC with their contentions.“These regulations are discouraging for private educational institutions which are required to meet the ever rising demand in the education sector,” added Prof Viswanathan.According to the EPSI, the condition to set aside a corpus fund of Rs 25 crore is going to result in blocking of the money, which could have been used to provide monetary help for needy meritorious students. As per the current practice, Rs 10 crore is set aside as corpus fund. While fixing fees too, the EPSI has urged the UGC to first form relevant statutory bodies across states to ensure fair practice.“The fee structure has to be fixed based on the services provided by an institute. A generalised norm in this regard will not work,” said Prof Dr Mangesh Karad, executive president and vice chancellor of MIT-ADT University, Pune. He also shared that the Fee Regulatory Authority in Maharashtra has allowed fixing fees in this manner for professional courses.

UGC draft norms on fixed term for Chancellor, mandatory corpus amount irk deemed-to-be varsities
Medical admission fraud: No bail for six accused of laundering
Times of India | 5 days ago | |
Times of India
5 days ago | |

MUMBAI: Observing that the predicate offence relates to cheating of various innocent students and their parents, many of whom have lost their hard-earned life savings, a special PMLA court has rejected the bail and discharge pleas of six accused in a money laundering case linked to MBBS admission fraud. "The applications are premature, if entertained and allowed will cause horrific consequences," special judge MG Deshpande said. The accused had sought release from jail and discharge on the grounds that since the predicate offence had been withdrawn during a Lok Adalat held earlier this month, the money laundering case could not proceed. They cited a recent Supreme Court ruling that held when there is no predicate or scheduled offence, the PMLA case cannot continue. The predicate or original offence is one based on which, the Enforcement Directorate registers its money laundering cases. However, special judge MG Deshpande said, "If the application is allowed in a hasty manner, as proposed by the accused...it will cause horrific consequences of disposal of special case relating to money laundering. At the cost of repetition, it has to be noted that accused are not prevented from filing any application as such, but at the same time the court is under obligation to wait till the period of limitation for filing appeal against the acquittal in LokAdalat.." Among those who moved the plea were Mahadev Ramchandra Deshmukh (64). In a chargesheet submitted in July this year, the ED had said that Deshmukh, a former president of a Satara-based medical college, in collusion with other accused cheated around "350 gullible students" and collected Rs 65.70 core. The admission was to be given in Institute of Medical Science and Research (IMSR) run by Shri Chhatrapati Shivaji Education Society, Satara, But neither admission nor refund was given, the ED said. In Friday's order, the special judge said that it had to be noted that, though the FIR was lodged by one person, there was list of 41 witnesses mentioned in the chargesheet who are basically the affected students or their parents, whose kids could not get admissions and had also lost huge money. "Admittedly none of the 41 witnesses was present at the time of withdrawal or compounding of the complaint in Lok Adalat dated November 12," the judge said. The judge also said that the period to challenge the acquittal has not lapsed till date. "Any victim can prefer appeal against acquittal and the Court has to wait till the period of appeal ends. Judicial discipline warrants the same," the judge said. In a separate order the special judge had allowed Arun Gore, the present director of Shree Chhatrapati Shivaji Education Society to intervene and oppose the pleas. Gore told the court the withdrawal or compounding of the case in the Lok Adalat on November 12, was fraudulent as many students who had lost their money on account of MBBS admissions have got affected by the withdrawal.

Medical admission fraud: No bail for six accused of laundering
Merely 9.5% in 18-19 age group are registered voters in Maharashtra
Times of India | 5 days ago | |
Times of India
5 days ago | |

MUMBAI: Less than 10% of the youth in the 18 to 19 age bracket are registered as voters in the state, revealed a recent report presented to the government by the chief electoral officer of Maharashtra. The percentage of voters in this age group from Mumbai city and its suburbs figure at the bottom of all the 36 districts; urban areas also generally record lower voter turnout in polls. Regions such as Parbhani, Hingoli and Nanded fare better than the rest (see box), but the numbers are dismal there too. Two years ahead of the assembly and Lok Sabha polls, the big question before the electoral body now is-how to catch them young? In a recent meeting with the state's governor Bhagat Singh Koshyari, higher education minister Chandrakant Patil announced that voter registration may be made mandatory for college admissions for students aged above 18. While it received flak from a section of opposition leaders and legal watchers, what is doable, officials said, is to get them registered at the time of admission. Some mechanism can be worked out to actively involve colleges and universities in the process, they say. Data from the Maharashtra chief electoral office shows that only around 5-16% of youth from each of the 36 districts in the 18-19 age group are on electoral rolls. This age group comprises around 0.34% of the total registered voters in the state. When compared with other age groups, including 20-29, 30-39 and 40-49, for instance, where the percentage of registered voters is 68.8%, 92.7%, 111.4%, respectively, the young group only makes up for about 9.5% of its projected population of 46 lakh. The state's chief electoral officer Shrikant Deshpande said they have been conducting awareness programmes across campuses. "Though our target is to get youth involved in the electoral process, urban apathy is the main concern. Cities such as Mumbai and Pune have a large number of student population, yet only a few thousand voters are registered. We want to address the new voters and get them on electoral rolls," said Deshpande, adding urban areas generally also see low turnout of voters. In the last three assembly elections, the rural voter turnout was 14-17% higher than the urban voter turnout. Universities and colleges can set up electoral literacy clubs (ELCs), appoint nodal officers, college ambassadors and support voters' awareness activities, mentions the electoral office's report. Assessment of ELCs could be part of college assessment by local inspection committees. Deshpande said, "With the thrust on credit-based multi-disciplinary learning, universities can also start credit courses to familiarise students with the electoral system, ethical voting, etc. These courses can also be activity based to give hands-on experience to students. Universities can act as think tanks and help address... urban apathy through research." Political science professor from Mumbai University, Mrudul Nile, said politicians need to first tackle apathy towards the electoral process, make the system more transparent, and allow younger legislators on political platforms. "Institutions can probably get students' databases during admissions and get them registered as voters, then persistently follow it up with them. The government also needs to look beyond institutions for youth participation, as less than 20% are enrolled for education," said Nile. Universities can ensure voter registration counters at college level and create awareness, said vice-chancellor, SNDT Women's University, Ujwala Chakradeo. Amol Matele, NCP spokesperson, said the state first needs to re-introduce campus elections. "Many of the current politicians have been youth leaders in their younger days. It is important to get the educated lot to participate in the political process and the onus to fight this political apathy is on the government. It should address problems such as inflation, unemployment," said Matele.

Merely 9.5% in 18-19 age group are registered voters in Maharashtra
  • Maharashtra To Make Voter Registration Mandatory For College Admission To Those Aged 18
  • Ndtv

    Voter registration will be mandatory for students above 18 seeking admission to collegesMumbai: The Maharashtra government will make it mandatory for students above 18 years of age to get their voter registration done for getting admission to colleges, a state minister has said.Speaking at a meeting of vice chancellors of non-agriculture universities at the Raj Bhavan in Mumbai on Thursday, state Higher and Technical Education Minister Chandrakant Patil also said that the government will introduce four-year degree courses from June 2023 as mandated under the National Education Policy (NEP) and the universities will have to implement the decision."There is no option for universities as they will have to implement the four-year degree courses from June as mandated under the NEP," he said, warning that action will be taken against those failing to do so.The government will soon constitute a committee of retired vice-chancellors to address the concerns of vice chancellors over the implementation of the NEP, Mr Patil said.Taking note of the dismal percentage of voter registration by students of universities and colleges, he said "The government will issue a resolution mandating students to get their voter registration done for getting admission to colleges." As against the goal of attaining the enrolment of 50 lakhs students in the higher education system, Maharashtra has enrolment of only 32 lakh students, Mr Patil said.The minister called upon universities to run a campaign to improve the enrollment percentage.He also said there was a need to take into cognisance the recommendations of NEP regarding providing education in mother tongue and skill development.State Governor Bhagat Singh Koshyari called upon vice chancellors of public universities in Maharashtra to turn universities 'aatmanirbhar' (self-reliant) to attain the goal of 'Aatmanirbhar Bharat'."Many private universities are doing well through self finance and distance education programmes," he said, while urging the universities to take steps for effective implementation of the NEP.The governor, who is also the chancellor of public universities in the state, said the NEP lays thrust on culture and the Indian knowledge system.He asked vice chancellors to create small advisory committees comprising dedicated officers, professors, young people and resource persons to advise them on the effective implementation of the policy in universities.The governor said he would hold a follow-up meeting of vice chancellors within six months to discuss what steps were taken on the issues agreed upon in the meeting.Chief Minister Eknath Shinde, who was present on the occasion, asserted that the state will implement the NEP in the best possible manner."The state government has decided to make suitable amendments in the Maharashtra Public Universities Act, 2016 to make the selection process of vice chancellors and pro-vice chancellors in sync with the guidelines of the University Grants Commission (UGC)," he said.Stating that the process of selection of vice chancellors will be expedited, he said new search committees for the selection of vice chancellors will be constituted soon.Expressing strong displeasure over the poor performance of some of the universities in key result areas, such as declaration of results of various examinations on time, Deputy Chief Minister Devendra Fadnavis asked the vice chancellors to take note of the lacunae and take corrective steps quickly.Expressing the need for bringing a robust digital system to make the implementation of NEP effective, Mr Fadnavis called for creating a live dashboard to report the 17 key result areas of the vice chancellors to monitor the situation from time to time.Laying thrust on greater transparency by educational institutions, Mr Fadnavis said the findings of the college inspection teams should be made available on the websites of the colleges.PromotedListen to the latest songs, only on JioSaavn.comHe said while good progress is being made in achieving higher gross enrollment in the state, the universities must focus on bringing excellence in education. Mr Fadnavis expressed concern over the low percentage of voter registration among college students. (Except for the headline, this story has not been edited by NDTV staff and is published from a syndicated feed.)Featured Video Of The DayWatch: Bus Driver Savagely Beats Up Biker In Bengaluru After Road Rage

  • Maharashtra To Make Voter Registration Mandatory For Students Above 18 Years Seeking Admission To Colleges
  • Ndtv

  • Students must produce voter cards while seeking admission to Maharashtra varsities
  • The Indian Express

    Voter registration cards will now be among mandatory documents a candidate above 18 years of age will have to produce while seeking admission to universities in Maharashtra. Aimed at improving awareness regarding voting, this is expected to help dismal voter registration among college-going youth.State Higher and Technical Education Minister Chandrakant Patil announced this during a meeting with of vice-chancellors (V-Cs) of all public universities, called by Governor Bhagat Singh Koshyari in his capacity of Chancellor to all state universities. The meeting was also attended by Chief Minister Eknath Shinde and Deputy CM Devendra Fadnavis.Among the other decisions announced are that from next academic year, degree courses will be of four-year tenure – prescribed by the National Education Policy (NEP) – opposed to the traditional three years.A committee of former V-Cs will be formed to resolve issues in the implementation of NEP.Chief Electoral Officer of Maharashtra, Shrikant Deshpande, who attended the meeting, appealed touniversities to create electoral literacy clubs to involve students in the democratic process, as currently, 90 per cent of university and college students are out of the voter registration list.

  • Maharashtra may make voter registration must for undergrad study
  • Times of India

    MUMBAI: Voter registration may soon be mandatory for students seeking degree college admissions in the state. Taking note of the dismal rate of voter registration by university and college students, higher and technical education minister Chandrakant Patil on Thursday said the government will issue a resolution mandating that students above the age of 18 years enrol themselves as voters during college admissions, reports Yogita Rao. Patil was speaking at a meet with the governor, CM, deputy CM, and vice-chancellors of 20 state universities. The state’s chief electoral officer, Shrikant Deshpande, told TOI that 90% of students in the 18-19 age bracket are not registered as voters. Of the 42. 03 lakh projected population in this age group in Maharashtra, barely 4. 36 lakh are enrolled as voters. Univs must offer four-year UG programme from 2023 The state’s chief electoral officer Shrikant Deshpande has flagged the need for a mechanism that will require all college aspirants to enrol themselves as voters. “Universities need to develop a system that can catch these youths right at the time of college admissions. If they are 18+ years and are not registered as voters, universities and colleges can get them registered on the spot. Universities also need to create electoral literacy clubs to involve students in the democratic process,” said Deshpande, adding that it should be a collective approach. Patil also said that universities will have to mandatorily offer the four-year undergraduate degree programme from June 2023 as mandated in the National Education Policy (NEP). TOI had earlier reported about the state government giving its nod for the programme. The Governor’s office will reconstitute the vice-chancellor search committees for Mumbai and Pune universities following the state’s decision to include a University Grants’ Commission (UGC) nominee. The committees were already formed by the governor’s office and in case of Pune University, an advertisement inviting applications was also released. However, with the amendment, chiefminister Eknath Shinde said new search committees will be constituted soon. While university officials are concerned about the delays in the appointment, Shinde said the process will be expedited. Currently, the committees have three members. The Governor will also have to appoint a search committee for the vice-chancellor of Yashwantrao Chavan Maharashtra Open University, said an official. Stating that the NEP lays thrust on culture and Indian knowledge systems, Governor Bhagat Singh Koshyari asked vice chancellors to create small advisory committees of dedicated officers, professors, young people andresource persons to advise them on the effective implementation of the policy in universities. Deputy CM Devendra Fadnavis took note of the poor performance of some universities in key result areas (KRAs) such as declaration of results. He called for creating a live dashboard to report the 21 KRAs, including multidisciplinary education, skill development, courses in mother tongue, internships, registration with the Academic Bank of Credit, creation of research development cell, industry collaboration among others. Universities will be assessed on the basis of these KRAs relevant to the NEP.

How can 1 per cent reservation be provided for minor orphans in jobs, Bombay High Court asks AG
The Indian Express | 1 week ago | |
The Indian Express
1 week ago | |

The Bombay High Court on Thursday questioned the Maharashtra government as to how a Government Resolution (GR) providing 1% reservation to minor orphans under 18 years of age in educational institutions could be extended for jobs in public employment“An orphan is a child and they are under 18 years of age. They may get reservation in the education field but how about jobs? How can they be employed before the age of 18? That is illegal. Reservation is sought for a particular class of children who are orphans…,” the bench orally remarked.The bench requested Advocate General Ashutosh Kumbhakoni to appear in the matter on the next date of hearing. A division bench of Chief Justice Dipankar Datta and Justice Abhay Ahuja was hearing a PIL by Pune-based social worker Amruta Karwande, an orphan herself, and Solapur resident Rahul Kamble, challenging the Government Resolution of August 23, 2021, which categorised the orphans into sub-categories and said the same was not in accordance with the definition of orphans as per the 2015 law and earlier GRs passed by Department of Women and Child DevelopmentOn August 23, 2021, the state department had issued a GR providing 1% reservation for orphans in education and public employment as they have to face several difficulties in life because of lack of parental support.The PIL pointed out that while the orphan reservation scheme was to provide benefit to the needy orphans, the impugned GR categorised the orphans into three categories. The first category consisted of children having no parents, siblings or close relatives and being taken care by the orphanage. The second category was of orphans who have lost their parents but information about their caste and relatives is available and whose responsibility of foster care is with the orphanage. The third category included those children who have lost their parents, but the responsibility of their care is on the relatives who are alive and their caste is known.The PIL, argued through advocate Metanshu Purandare, sought to rectify the impugned GR by which the state government issued clarifications for its orphans reservation scheme. As per a 2018 Cabinet resolution, the government provided 1% reservation to orphans in the open category in the field of education and public employment and the same was given on the ground that orphans could not avail caste benefits or other benefits after they leave children’s homes.The plea claimed the reservation was initially only for those orphans with orphan certificates and whose documents did not mention caste, and there was no information on their parents or relatives.However, the petitioners said the replies they availed on their applications seeking information under the Right to Information Act revealed that the children belonging to the third category availed maximum benefit in most districts of the state, while the scheme was crucial and mainly formulated for children belonging to the first category.Therefore, the PIL sought that the impugned GR be quashed and set aside, the state government asked to come up with a fresh GR to ensure the scheme would benefit the most needy orphans.

How can 1 per cent reservation be provided for minor orphans in jobs, Bombay High Court asks AG
Our thought is how to get PoK, says BJP's CT Ravi
The Economic Times | 1 week ago | |
The Economic Times
1 week ago | |

BJP national general secretary CT Ravi on Thursday said that there was no border dispute between Karnataka and Maharashtra. During an ET Roundtable, Ravi said that recently, the age-old border issue regarding villages in Karnataka and Maharashtra came up and Karnataka CM Basavaraj Bommai and Maharashtra deputy CM Devendra Fadnavis made some comments on this. Both the states have BJP-led governments. There are certain Marathi-speaking areas in Karnataka such as Belagavi which Maharashtra always claims to belong to them. Similarly, there are some Kannada-speaking areas like Jat which Karnataka claims to belong to their state, he said.Ravi is an MLA from Karnataka and is currently party in-charge of Maharashtra, Tamil Nadu and Goa."We are thinking about PoK. Both Jat and Belagavi are inside the country and are in safe hands. Our thought is how to bring PoK back," he said.On hijab, he said: "We never oppose hijab. But schools have a dress code and it is common for everyone. Is it right to defy that dress code?" He gave an example of the recent anti-hijab movement in Iran and said that people are protesting hijab in a country which follows Sharia Law. "Here, in India, which has a uniform law, some people are protesting for Sharia."Regarding the education policy, he said: "After NEP implementation, there is no dispute. NEP gives everyone the opportunity to get education in their mother tongue." "If someone in Belagavi wants to get an education in Marathi, they can do it. Similarly, Kannada-speaking people in Maharashtra can get education in their language. If you look at the history of India, several wars took place over different regions. But no war happened over language. There is an interrelation between all Indian languages. We are here to strengthen that relationship," he said.

Our thought is how to get PoK, says BJP's CT Ravi
Less than 20 students in 6106 govt schools in Himachal Pradesh, shows UDISE report
The Indian Express | 1 week ago | |
The Indian Express
1 week ago | |

As per a report, there are less than 20 students in 6106 government schools in Himachal Pradesh. These include 5113 primary and 993 middle schools.The number ranges between 21-60 in 4478 primary and 895 middle schools and 61 to 100 in 681 primary and 47 middle schools, a recent report by Unified District Information System for Education stated.There are 18,028 schools in the state of which 15,313 are government-run.According to the report, there are 65,973 teachers in government schools including 39,906 male and 26,257 female.However, 12 primary government schools are running without a teacher while 2,969 have one teacher, 5,533 have two teachers and 1,779 have three teachers, it stated.Similarly, 51 middle schools are being run by a single teacher, 416 by two teachers, 773 by three teachers and 701 by four to six teachers, it said.The report also stated that one secondary school with minimum of ten classes is being run by two teachers, ten schools by three teachers, 212 by four to six teachers and 710 by seven to ten teachers.Even the senior secondary schools are facing a shortage of teachers and 22 schools are running with four to six teachers, 189 with seven to ten teachers, 684 with 11 to 15 teachers and 981 schools have more than 15 teachers.Further, the report pointed out that despite 63,690 rooms in government schools, seven primary schools are without a room, 338 are running in one room, 2,495 in two rooms, 4,111 in three rooms and 3,402 in seven to ten rooms. Meanwhile, three middle schools are without a room, 216 have only one room, 241 are running in two rooms,1,111 in three rooms and 352 in four to six rooms.The situation is no better in secondary and senior secondary schools with a minimum of ten and 12 classes respectively. As many as six secondary schools are being run in one room, 25 in two rooms, 117 in three rooms, 697 in four to six rooms and 74 in seven to ten rooms.Similarly, one senior secondary school in the state is functioning in a single room, seven in two rooms, 17 in three rooms, 245 in four to six rooms, 947 in seven to ten rooms, 454 in 11 to 15 rooms and only 205 schools have more than 15 rooms.Schools have been opened to comply with the guidelines of the Right to Education Act. As per the act, there has to be a primary school within 1.5 km for school-going children but due to tough demography and topography in the hill state, the strength of students is low but still they have to be taught. However, the rationalism of teachers is an issue, officials in the education department said.The student-teacher ratio is 14.68 in primary section, 12.09 in middle schools, 10.38 in secondary and 12.31 in senior secondary schools, they said.The general enrollment is 100 per cent or above in primary, middle and secondary level and 90 per cent in the senior secondary level while the dropout rate is zero per cent at primary and elementary level and 1.47 per cent at secondary level, they said.The sustained efforts of the state government to shift students from the government to private schools have yielded results as enrollment in government schools has increased by 37,952 during 2021-2022, the report said.However, enrollment in all schools in the state registered an insignificant decrease of 1,067 as compared to a drop of 26,154 in 2020-21. The total enrollment in all schools dropped from 13,33,315 to 13, 32,148 but the enrollment in 15,313 government schools stood at 8,31,310 in 2021-22 compared to 7.93,358 in the previous year.Director of higher education Amarjeet Sharma said, “Har Ghar Patshala” initiative introduced during the pandemic and the use of information and communication technology in government schools has brought them at par with the private sector and we are now focusing on academics, sports and co curricular activities for the overall development of the children.He said the high fee structure during the pandemic in private schools also compelled parents to shift to government schools.

Less than 20 students in 6106 govt schools in Himachal Pradesh, shows UDISE report
MBBS in Marathi: Maha govt sets up panel for roadmap to publish medical books in local language
The Indian Express | 1 week ago | |
The Indian Express
1 week ago | |

The Maharashtra government has set up a seven-member committee to chalk out a roadmap for publishing MBBS course books in Marathi language, an official from the state medical education and research department said on Thursday.Read |MBBS in Hindi? Faculty, council members, students reactNotably, the Madhya Pradesh government recently launched books for the MBBS (Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery) course in Hindi.The seven-member panel formed in Maharashtra is headed by the medical education and research department’s joint director Ajay Chandanwale, the official said.“We spoke with officials in Madhya Pradesh which published the MBBS course books in Hindi. The next step is to hold the first meeting of the committee members in Maharashtra and discuss the road map for the course publication in Marathi. The meeting is likely to be held in Mumbai next week,” a senior official from the medical education and research said. Notably, the Madhya Pradesh government recently launched books for the MBBS (Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery) course in Hindi.The seven-member panel formed in Maharashtra is headed by the medical education and research department’s joint director Ajay Chandanwale, the official said.“We spoke with officials in Madhya Pradesh which published the MBBS course books in Hindi. The next step is to hold the first meeting of the committee members in Maharashtra and discuss the road map for the course publication in Marathi. The meeting is likely to be held in Mumbai next week,” a senior official from the medical education and research said. The seven-member panel formed in Maharashtra is headed by the medical education and research department’s joint director Ajay Chandanwale, the official said.“We spoke with officials in Madhya Pradesh which published the MBBS course books in Hindi. The next step is to hold the first meeting of the committee members in Maharashtra and discuss the road map for the course publication in Marathi. The meeting is likely to be held in Mumbai next week,” a senior official from the medical education and research said. “We spoke with officials in Madhya Pradesh which published the MBBS course books in Hindi. The next step is to hold the first meeting of the committee members in Maharashtra and discuss the road map for the course publication in Marathi. The meeting is likely to be held in Mumbai next week,” a senior official from the medical education and research said.

MBBS in Marathi: Maha govt sets up panel for roadmap to publish medical books in local language
  • Maharashtra Government Sets Up 7-Member Panel For Roadmap To Publish MBBS Books In Marathi
  • Ndtv

  • MBBS books in Marathi: Panel set up in Maharashtra
  • Times of India

    MUMBAI: A month after Union home minister Amit Shah launched MBBS books in Hindi in Madhya Pradesh, the Maharashtra medical education department led by senior BJP leader Girish Mahajan on Wednesday set up a seven-member committee headed by joint director of medical education and research Ajay Chandanwale for drafting an action plan for translating MBSS books in Marathi. Other members of the committee are joint director Vivek Pakhmode, Vaidya Shriram Savarikar, Manish Inamdar, Swati Meshram, MUHS pro-vice-chancellor Milind Nikumb, while pharmacology associate professor (J J Hospital) Akash Secretary will be the member secretary and nodal officer of the committee,.

Maharashtra: School education minister Deepak Kesarkar plans remedial coaching in schools
Times of India | 1 week ago | |
Times of India
1 week ago | |

MUMBAI: School education minister Deepak Kesarkar on Tuesday said that the state will adopt a successful school education model that has been implemented in Kerala. Conducting exams at regular intervals and offering remedial coaching to students who are not doing well and testing them again, upgrading the syllabus every 10 years, and focusing on teaching in the mother tongue are some of the practices in Kerala. Kesarkar said that some of the best practices from other states, including Punjab and Rajasthan, can be adopted here too. He said that the state will now stress on student-focused reforms. Kesarkar said that pre-primary education will soon be brought under the purview of the school education department. During an interaction with the media, Kesarkar said that schools will now return to testing students from class III at regular intervals by holding unit tests, semester-end and final exams. With the 'no-fail' policy prescribed in the Right to Education Act, several schools were following grading systems and did not test students at regular intervals, said a teacher from an aided school. "While no-fail policy will continue, as failing students may lead to dropouts in schools, regular evaluation of students will bring in accountability," said Kesarkar. He said that schools in Kerala come under the gram panchayats. He mentioned that every school in Kerala has a library, which helps in inculcating the reading habit. "Many states are doing well in terms of education. While Maharashtra is a huge state and cannot be compared with Kerala, we can adopt successful models from across the country here," he said. The state has already started the implementation of the National Education Policy (NEP), said Kesarkar. He said leading countries in the world are imparting education in their mother tongue. "In advanced countries like Russia, education is imparted in Russian. In Germany, which is a leading country in terms of technology, education is imparted in the German language. If students learn in their own other tongue, they will comprehend it better. English should definitely be taught, but mother tongue should not be sidelined," he said. The minister said that soon pre-primary schools will be brought under the purview of the school education board. Among other announcements, Kesarkar said that from the next academic session, the school syllabus will be split into three sections and notebooks will be added to the textbooks. The sectional book, with booklets for writing, will have to be changed every three months. A principal said they will have to wait and see the guidelines. He said that private schools used to conduct exams anyway, but there has been no uniformity.

Maharashtra: School education minister Deepak Kesarkar plans remedial coaching in schools
Maharashtra to implement ‘Kerala Pattern’ from next academic year
The Indian Express | 1 week ago | |
The Indian Express
1 week ago | |

Maharashtra is all set to implement the ‘Kerala Pattern’ in school education from the next academic year. This will bring exams back to schools at regular intervals from Class III onwards, followed by remedial teaching and re-exams to gauge the students’ development. Other changes will include focus on holistic development of children by providing exposure and opportunities to grow in extra-curricular activities such as sports and cultural activities, among others.Maharashtra School Education Minister Deepak Kesarkar shared the plan while speaking to the media on Tuesday. “Holding exams does not mean there will be any failure in schools. That may lead to children dropping out of schools. But exams at regular intervals will ensure accountability through evaluation of students,” said Kesarkar. He was referring to the no-failure policy prescribed by the Right To Education (RTE) Act.The state government is also looking at providing a nurturing culture for students who excel in sports and cultural activities, to grow in their respective fields, following the support provided to school children in sports and other activities.“The Maharashtra School Education department visited several states in India who have consistently shown good performance in academics. And following the reviews, it was decided to bring a few of their initiatives to Maharashtra,” said Kesarkar.Elaborating on the plan, Kailash Pagare, state project director of the Maharashtra Prathamik Shikshan Parishad, said, ” Following the no-failure policy in the RTE, there were no exams in schools, even as private schools were holding exams. With reintroduction of exams, we aim at bringing accountability not only among teachers and schools but also in students and parents about studying. Following the continuous comprehensive evaluation as per the RTE; there will be exams every month along with term-end and final exams. The evaluation report will show which children are lagging behind and a remedial teaching programme will have to be conducted by respective teachers for such children, which will be followed by a re-exam. Students will study sincerely, knowing that if they do not do well, they will have to appear for re-exam after preparing again.”

Maharashtra to implement ‘Kerala Pattern’ from next academic year
Maharashtra Governor calls for integrated corridor between Panchavati and Trimbakeshwar
The Indian Express | 1 week ago | |
The Indian Express
1 week ago | |

Maharashtra Governor Bhagat Singh Koshyari has called for creating an Integrated Corridor for Panchavati – Trimbakeshwar on the lines of Kashi and Ayodhya corridor. He was speaking at the inauguration of a one-day seminar, ‘Vikasayatra – New Perspectives of Indic Intellectual Heritage’, held at Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan Auditorium on Tuesday.Mumbai News1Mumbai traffic cops receive ‘hoax’ message claiming assassination bid on PM, probe ordered2New lab at St Xavier’s Technical Institute to conduct gait analysis3Bombay HC CJ recuses from hearing PIL seeking CBI, ED probe into ‘disproportionate assets’ of Uddhav Thackeray, familyMore from MumbaiStating that Indian civilisation is old and at the same time ever-new, he called for spreading awareness about Indian culture and civilisation across the world. The seminar was organised by the Central Sanskrit University in association with the Mumbadevi Adarsh Sanskrit Mahavidyalaya at the instance of the Ministry of Education, Government of India. Stating that Indian civilisation is old and at the same time ever-new, he called for spreading awareness about Indian culture and civilisation across the world. The seminar was organised by the Central Sanskrit University in association with the Mumbadevi Adarsh Sanskrit Mahavidyalaya at the instance of the Ministry of Education, Government of India.

Maharashtra Governor calls for integrated corridor between Panchavati and Trimbakeshwar
MHT CET Counselling: 3-year LLB Round 2 seat allotment result revised
The Indian Express | 1 week ago | |
The Indian Express
1 week ago | |

MHT CET Counselling 2022: The State Common Entrance Test (CET) Cell, Maharashtra today released the revised seat allotment list for 3 year LLB round 2 counselling. Candidates can check the revised result at the official website – llb3cap2.mahacet.orgThe seat allotment list released on November 21 was cancelled as one college had not informed the Directorate of Higher Education (DHE) about the withdrawal of one division.Read |IIT Roorkee to offer programme on HR Analytics Candidates who are allotted seats for admission to colleges in round 2 have to accept the seat and report to the allotted college between November 22 and November 25.  Round 2 registration process for 3 year LLB programme started on November 10. The admission process under CAP round 2 will conclude on November 28 and the final round for vacant CAP seats will commence from November 29.  The seat allotment list released on November 21 was cancelled as one college had not informed the Directorate of Higher Education (DHE) about the withdrawal of one division.Read |IIT Roorkee to offer programme on HR Analytics Candidates who are allotted seats for admission to colleges in round 2 have to accept the seat and report to the allotted college between November 22 and November 25.  Round 2 registration process for 3 year LLB programme started on November 10. The admission process under CAP round 2 will conclude on November 28 and the final round for vacant CAP seats will commence from November 29.  Candidates who are allotted seats for admission to colleges in round 2 have to accept the seat and report to the allotted college between November 22 and November 25.  Round 2 registration process for 3 year LLB programme started on November 10. The admission process under CAP round 2 will conclude on November 28 and the final round for vacant CAP seats will commence from November 29.  The admission process under CAP round 2 will conclude on November 28 and the final round for vacant CAP seats will commence from November 29.   

MHT CET Counselling: 3-year LLB Round 2 seat allotment result revised
Just 7,000 schools are accredited in country: Maharashtra governor Bhagat Singh Koshyari
Times of India | 1 week ago | |
Times of India
1 week ago | |

MUMBAI: Only about 7,000 of the over 15 lakh schools in the country are accredited by the National Accreditation Board for Education and Training (NABET). Maharashtra governor Bhagat Singh Koshyari urged schools to get themselves accredited on the lines of higher education institutions, which he said will bring quality consciousness among schools. Koshyari was speaking at the inaugural session of the Regional Quality Conclave on quality assurance and accreditation for school education in Mumbai. He said world-class education is being offered in private schools and therefore, they could adopt government schools to provide quality education to the poor. P R Mehta, chairman, NABET, who was also in Mumbai, told TOI the board now wants to scale up the numbers. “It cannot be done overnight for 15 lakh schools; therefore, we will be partnering with external agencies or state bodies. The objective currently is to promote self-assessment in schools and then they should go in for accreditation by external agencies. It will remain a voluntary scheme, but we as a nation have started speaking about quality and accreditation for the first time in the National Education Policy and these will be our mission,” said Mehta. The accredited 7,000 schools also include private schools from all over the country, municipal schools, even from Mumbai, and tribal schools. The event was organised by the Education Promotion Society for India. NABET is a constituent board of Quality Council of India (QCI). R P Singh, secretary general of QCI, said, “Accreditation is playing a very important role. Efforts are being made to enhance the learning quality of the students along with the infrastructure...” Koshyari stressed the need to provide education to the children in their mothertongue at least till Class 3.

Just 7,000 schools are accredited in country: Maharashtra governor Bhagat Singh Koshyari
  • Accreditation for schools: NABET mulls sops
  • The Indian Express

    The National Accreditation Board for Education and Training (NABET) is mulling over adding incentives to encourage more schools to seek accreditation even as it launched a self assessment tool to familiarise them with the process. NABET accreditation is in line with the National Education Policy (NEP) recommendations and is expected to help parents make an informed choice at the time of admission. As of now, out of around 15 lakh schools in India, only 7,000 have the accreditation.At a one-day conclave on Quality Assurance and Accreditation for School Education here on Monday, Maharashtra Governor Bhagat Singh Koshyari spoke about the lukewarm response of schools. The conclave was organised by the Education Promotion Society for India (EPSI), an autonomous society of private educational institutions. Koshyari appealed to schools to get themselves assessed and accredited on the lines of NAAC accreditation for higher educational institutions to bring quality consciousness among schools.Elaborating on the current status and road map ahead, NABET Chairperson P R Mehta said, “Incentivisation is one of the suggestions to promote accreditation among schools…But the process has to remain voluntary. Looking at the variety of schools, making it mandatory will not help. Each school will take a different amount of time to perform depending on the kind of resources available…The idea is to bring in more participation to ensure quality enhancement.”Three months ago, NABET launched a grading system which will be based on self-assessment. “There is a fixed format of self-assessment for schools seeking grades. It will include parameters such as infrastructure, process followed to assess teaching-learning methods and a student-centric approach; and finally outcome,” said Mehta.

AP Aqua University to become a reality after years of delay
The Indian Express | 1 week ago | |
The Indian Express
1 week ago | |

After years of delay in its establishment, the Andhra Pradesh Aqua University is finally set to become a reality.Andhra Pradesh, which is the largest exporter of marine products, becomes the fifth state after Karnataka, Kerala, Tamil Nadu and West Bengal to have such an university while Maharashtra is home to the Central Institute of Fisheries Education.The AP Aqua University will come up on a 40-acre site near Narasapuram in West Godavari district and will be built at an estimated cost of Rs 332 crore in the first phase.In the second phase, a seafront campus and research centre will be established on a 350-acre site at Biyyaputippa village at a cost of Rs 222 crore, according to the Chief Minister’s Office.West Godavari is the hub of aquaculture in the state with shrimp farms spread over thousands of hectares and presence of numerous processing units.The previous Chandrababu Naidu government first mooted the proposal to set up an exclusive fisheries university, given the booming aquaculture sector in the state, in public-private partnership mode.Thailand-based Asian Institute of Technology came forward in 2015 to a partnership for technology transfer and Bhimavaram-based Anand Group of Companies ventured to establish the university in an area of 150 acres.In 2017, the Chinese Xi’an University too agreed to extend its cooperation for setting up the fisheries university through knowledge transfer and research.“But the university did not take off as the previous government failed to allocate required land,” sources in the CMO said.The Y S Jagan Mohan Reddy government enacted a legislation in December 2020 for setting up the AP Fisheries University and subsequently changed the name to AP Aqua University.But the project saw no progress for close to two years as the ground-breaking event was put off several times over the months.According to the legislation, the objective of the university is to impart education in different branches of fisheries science and undertake extension activities in rural areas of the state.Promotion of research, technology refinement in production and post-harvest technologies, including processing and marketing, and streamlining fisheries education leading to comprehensive development of aqua sector are some of the other objectives of the university.The aqua university will offer diploma in fisheries and undergraduate and post-graduate degrees in Fisheries Science, besides PhD degrees.The existing College of Fishery Science at Muthukur in SPS Nellore district, the Sri Mandali Venkata Krishna Rao Fisheries Polytechnic in Krishna district, fisheries research stations at Kakinada and Undi, the instructional research aqua firm at Balabhadrapuram will now be brought under the AP Aqua University.A major research project on fish disease surveillance being undertaken by the College of Fishery Science will also be brought under the new university, apart from the Antibiotic Residue Analysis Laboratory at Visakhapatnam and Advance Diagnostic Laboratory at Undi.The state government hopes the university, when fully functional, will provide the much-needed skilled human resources for the aquaculture sector and immensely benefit the farmers.“Through right interventions, aqua crop losses can be curtailed, thereby leading to a monetary benefit of about Rs 4,000 crore per annum to the farmers,” a top official of the Animal Husbandry and Fisheries Department said.Proposals for setting up new fisheries colleges and polytechnics in different parts of the state were under consideration, he said.

AP Aqua University to become a reality after years of delay
CM: Have Punjabi on signboards by Feb 21 or govt will make you toe line
Times of India | 1 week ago | |
Times of India
1 week ago | |

Amritsar: Punjab chief minister Bhagwant Mann on Saturday gave a call for initiating a mass movement of using Punjabi language on signboards in private and public buildings across the state. His appeal, however, came with a rider: that if people don’t use Punjabi in signboards by February 21, which is International Mother Language Day, the government could make them toe its line.Speaking at a state-level function in Guru Nanak Dev University to mark Punjabi language month, he cited states like Maharashtra, Tamil Nadu and others where people had used signboards of their native language on their shops and commercial establishments. “Time has come when Punjabis should come forward to adopt this practice,” he said.He indicated that those who wouldn’t put up signboards in the Punjabi language could be asked to do so by government. “The wise Punjabis will adopt this before February 21 and the remaining ones will be made to toe the line of government after that,” he said.He said English was universally accepted as a link language, but it should not be promoted at the cost and status of the mother tongue. Mann urged educational institutes to initiate specialised courses in the Punjabi language to encourage students to join it. He said the creativity of students in the Punjabi language must be promoted by giving special focus to them. Chief minister Mann, who himself had gained success as a Punjabi comedian, said the language had produced a number of littérateurs, intellectuals, and poets. Higher education minister Gurmeet Singh Meet Hayer said mother tongue was the most important source of communication for any individual. On the occasion, chief minister Mann also released new books of the higher education and languages department. He also felicitated writers on the occasion. He later visited the Attari border.

CM: Have Punjabi on signboards by Feb 21 or govt will make you toe line
Bhagwant Mann urges people to begin mass movement of using Punjabi language on signboards
The Indian Express | 1 week ago | |
The Indian Express
1 week ago | |

Chief Minister Bhagwant Mann Saturday exhorted people to start a mass movement for putting up all the signboards on private and public buildings across the state in Punjabi language.Addressing a state-level event to mark Punjabi Language Month at Guru Nanak Dev University, Mann cited the examples of Maharashtra and Tamil Nadu where people showed respect to their mother tongue by using their native language on signboards of shops and commercial establishments. He said the time had come for Punjabis to come forward and adopt this “noble practice”.Mann exhorted people to make sure that all signboards prominently displayed Punjabi with other languages as a mark of respect to the mother tongue.People should ensure that signboards in Punjabi are put up before International Mother Language Day on February 21, Mann said as he underscored the need to make this a mass movement. He said wise Punjabis would adopt this approach before February 21 while the remaining ones would be made to toe the government line after that.The CM also called upon the Punjabi community in India and across the world to promote Punjabi language and culture. “It is a fact that no one can survive by detaching themselves from their rich culture and mother tongue,” said Mann.He pointed out that while English was universally accepted across the world as a link language, it should not be promoted at the cost and status of one’s mother tongue. “It is a curse if anyone forgets their mother tongue. Unfortunately the fad of English and other languages has made Punjabis drift from their mother language,” said Mann.The chief minister called for this trend to be reversed as it was undeniable that people could communicate and express themselves only in their mother tongue.“Due to mental slavery, we still believe in superiority of English whereas the fact is that Punjabi is the best language for every one of us. Many countries abroad are using Punjabi language but we are somehow shying away from using it. No language is a symbol of intelligence but unfortunately we are continuously ignoring our own mother tongue just to pursue English,” he added.Citing the example of France, the chief minister said the French preferred to converse in their mother tongue as a mark of respect, adding that Punjabis should also make their native language an integral part of their lives.He added that every Punjabi should feel proud of their glorious cultural heritage.Punjab is the land of great gurus, saints, seers and martyrs, he said, adding that it had been a torchbearer for mankind for ages. He went on to add that Punjabis had carved a niche for themselves across the globe by their hard work and dedication.Punjabi is a treasure trove of literature, songs, poems and other material, he said, adding that the time had come to preserve this wealth and perpetuate it. “We must feel proud of our language, culture and traditions,” he said, adding that universities and colleges must come forward for the cause.The chief minister also urged the educational institutes to initiate specialised courses in Punjabi to encourage students.Earlier, Higher Education Minister Gurmeet Singh Meet Hayer apprised about the efforts being made by the department to acquaint younger generations with the glorious heritage of Punjab. He said that mother tongue is the most important source of communication for any individual.On the occasion the Chief Minister also released new books of the Higher Education and Languages Department. He also felicitated the eminent writers on the occasion.

Bhagwant Mann urges people to begin mass movement of using Punjabi language on signboards
Even her critics recognise her patriotism, staunch secularism, empathy for poor: Sonia on Indira Gandhi
The Indian Express | 1 week ago | |
The Indian Express
1 week ago | |

Senior Congress leader Sonia Gandhi on Saturday said former prime minister Indira Gandhi left an indelible mark on the country and even her critics recognise her commitment to “all-inclusive patriotism, her staunch secularism’ and empathy for the poor.The former Congress president was speaking at an event to present the 2021 Indira Gandhi prize for peace, disarmament and development. She said those who have received the award have exemplified the values Indira Gandhi cherished, the ideals she espoused, and the causes she championed.The award was given to ‘Pratham’, a non-governmental organisation working for providing quality education to all children.“Every once in a while institutions and organisations too are recognised for their contributions in areas very close to her (Indira Gandhi’s) heart. Today is one such occasion,” Sonia Gandhi said.The prize was presented by former vice president M Hamid Ansari to the NGO for its pioneering work over more than 25 years towards seeking to ensure every child has access to quality education, for its innovative use of digital technology to deliver education, for its programmes to provide skills to young adults and for its regular evaluation of the quality of education and timely response in enabling children to learn during the Covid-related school closures.“Indira Gandhi left an indelible imprint on our country. She continues to be applauded and admired for her numerous achievements.“Even her critics recognise that there was an unchanging core to her personality, that defined who she was and what she did – that is, her fierce commitment to an all-inclusive patriotism; her staunch secularism; her indomitable courage and fortitude; her empathy for the poor and instinctive rapport with the people,” she said.“Her unwavering support to self-reliance in all fields, especially in science and technology; her firm belief in the value of education as an instrument of social emancipation and empowerment; and her passionate conviction in environmental conservation and protection of biodiversity,even as India strove for a faster pace of economic growth,” the former Congress chief said.Sonia Gandhi, who is the chairperson of Indira Gandhi Memorial Trust and Chairperson, said Indira Gandhi would have been pleased that this prize for 2021 is recognising work done in the field of education.“As she once said, ‘Education is a means to place at the service of common people scientific and other knowledge that is acquired, and not just a means of earning a livelihood’. Literacy, she stressed frequently, is not enough; she quoted Swami Vivekananda’s exhortation that what is important is not what one knows, but what one becomes, and I quote, ‘We must have life-building, man-making, character-making education.” “Right education transforms the small into the great,” Sonia Gandhi said, quoting the former prime minister.She said ‘Pratham’ is a remarkable institution that in less than thirty years has made a name for itself in the field of education, not only in India but globally as well.She said it has achieved much in making school education more meaningful and impactful. It has brought new thinking not only in pedagogy but also in monitoring and evaluating as an aid to improve learning outcomes, she said.Its reports and analysis have influenced public discourse on primary and secondary education in different states where its engagement has offered a very productive example of public-private partnerships, the former Congress chief said.“Indira Gandhi having spent a year at Shantiniketan herself was alive to the need for innovation in education, which she strove for during her tenure as Prime Minister. We are glad, very glad, in fact, that the prize is being received on behalf of Pratham by Dr Rukmini Banerji.“I congratulate Pratham on behalf of all of you too and I hope the prize that celebrates Indira Gandhi will provide renewed impetus to the work of Dr. Banerji and her colleagues at Pratham in the future,” Gandhi said.Congress president Mallikarjun Kharge and Rajasthan chief minister Ashok Gehlot were also present at the function, besides a host of other Congress leaders.

Even her critics recognise her patriotism, staunch secularism, empathy for poor: Sonia on Indira Gandhi
Nashik education officer asks schools to take part in toilet selfie competition, draws ire
The Indian Express | 2 weeks ago | |
The Indian Express
2 weeks ago | |

An order by the Nashik district education officer, asking students of all government schools to participate in a ‘selfie with toilet’ competition and sketch their ‘dream toilet’, has drawn the ire of schools and educationists who have questioned the intent of holding such an event.On November 14, the district education officer issued an order instructing schools to celebrate World Toilet Day on November 19, for which schools are expected to organise various activities.The order states that on the occasion of World Toilet Day, a ‘Clean Toilet Campaign’ has been launched, as part of which competitions and activities have to be arranged for students from classes IV to X on the theme ‘Sanitisation and groundwater’.Apart from ‘selfie with toilet’, other activities include a drawing competition on topics, such as ‘My dream toilet’, ‘My school, My safe toilet’, and street play competitions on topics of ‘My school, my toilet’ and ‘Hygienic ways of using toilet’. While these are competitions for students, teachers are also expected to participate in slogan-making competitions on the subject of clean toilets and healthy habits. All competitions are to be held online. Schools were asked to hold competitions and accept entries, following which results would be declared on November 19.The order was issued by the Education Officer of Nashik Zilla Parishad (ZP), B D Kanoj, who was not available for comment.However, schools and educationists have questioned the rationale behind such a competition. “This order has been issued without application of mind. Why are you forcing children to take selfies with toilets? ” asked a ZP teacher.Teachers said the focus of the government should be to provide clean and functional toilets, instead of asking students to take selfies with them. One of the teachers pointed to the recent data under the Unified District Information System for Education report. According to the data, in Maharashtra, of 65,639 government schools, 64,581 have toilets. Moreover, toilets are functional in only 62,038 of them.When contacted, Director of Education (Primary), Sharad Gosavi, said he was not aware of any such order. “The Directorate Office for School Education has not issued any such order for celebration of World Toilet Day. It could be a local initiative,” said Gosavi.

Nashik education officer asks schools to take part in toilet selfie competition, draws ire
Private schools in Mumbai violating RTE Act, BMC not taking action: AAP
The Indian Express | 2 weeks ago | |
The Indian Express
2 weeks ago | |

Aam Aadmi Party (AAP) Wednesday attacked Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation (BMC) for its alleged failure to crack the whip against private schools violating the Right to Education Act. AAP leaders asked if there was a nexus between private schools and the BMC education department and alleged gross violations of the RTE Act, which guarantees free and compulsory education to all children in the 6 to 14 age group.Addressing a press conference in Mumbai, senior AAP leader Dhanraj Vanjari alleged the BMC education department was not taking any punitive action against such schools and giving them a free hand to act arbitrarily.Dalvi said, “Big private schools running without RTE recognition in Mumbai are being shielded without action. Money plays an important role in this and despite the provisions in the law, poor students are not getting free education in private schools.”“Parents admit their children in private schools by paying exorbitant fees. Due to the non-recovery of fines by BMC, the government has lost revenue of about Rs 600 crore. Also, there has been a loss of approximately Rs 1,200 crore due to non-action against many schools without RTE recognition in Maharashtra,” Dalvi added.AAP Mumbai president Preeti Sharma Menon said common citizens face a lot of hardships to pay their children’s school fees. “It is necessary for the government to take concrete steps to stop the arbitrariness of private schools. But the education department of the state government and the BMC is shying away from taking concrete steps to take action against schools,” Menon said.“The BMC has been ruled by Shiv Sena-BJP for many years. Both Shiv Sena and the BJP deliberately ignored the scam for their corrupt practices of power. Private schools commercialising education are being patronised, causing a loss of revenue to the government, and poor children are being denied their right to free education. The BMC should learn from the education model of the Delhi government,” she added.A senior BMC officer, requesting anonymity, said, “In the budget of 2022-23, we made provisions of Rs 3,370 crore for school education. Emphasis has been given to improving both education and infrastructure at schools.”“Our focus is administration. We can’t make any political comments. The rise in student enrolment in BMC-run schools is a measure to show things have improved,” the officer added.

Private schools in Mumbai violating RTE Act, BMC not taking action: AAP
  • Govt stalling Safe School Project: Aaditya Thackeray; BMC denies
  • The Indian Express

    SHIV SENA MLA Aaditya Thackeray on Monday accused the state government of shutting down Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation’s (BMC) Safe School Project which was proposed to be implemented in 186 municipal schools in Mumbai in 2020-21. It included making access to schools safe, and regular health check-ups in all BMC schools.Taking to social media on Monday, Thackeray said, “Safe Schools was a simple project envisioned by us with @mybmc where @WRICitiesIndia and urban planners had marked out 186 municipal schools (7 specially abled children schools) for safer entry and exit of students in 500m radius to prevent accidents or crimes.”He added, “Once inside the school, the Safe School project entailed mental healthcare, dental check-ups, diabetes awareness and management, eye check-ups. All of which now suddenly seems to have been put on the backburner by the UD Dept and the BMC.”“We launched this program on May 11, post which urban planners worked on 186 schools. However, right before the tender stage of works, the government was betrayed by a few, who later formed an unconstitutional government. This work must be beyond petty politics!” he said.However, BMC denied the allegation. A senior official from the planning department said, “Out of 190 schools, urban planners have been appointed for 25 as a pilot. The municipal commissioner’s sanction has been taken to utilise a Rs 50 crore fund. We have identified 25 schools – 10 in the Eastern Suburbs, and 15 in Western Suburbs. Preparation of tender documents and transfer of funds is in process.”

Maharashtra govt school admissions better after pandemic
Times of India | 2 weeks ago | |
Times of India
2 weeks ago | |

PUNE: Over two lakh more students enrolled in state government schools in the 2021-22 academic year compared to 2019-20, according to data released by the Unified District Information System (UDISE) recently. Schools began conducting online classes in 2020 after the coronavirus pandemic struck. Educationists said that once the schools reopened for physical classes, teachers went on a major enrollment drive to ensure all children were brought back into academics, and this may have helped the numbers. Santosh Jadhav, a zilla parishad teacher from Indapur, said: "It has become clear that the public has increased trust in government schools as compared to private schools, where online education and experiments have been rampant during the pandemic period. The total number of students in the formal education stream has decreased during the Covid period, and private schools were hit the hardest." "We were on a mission to bring students back after schools started normally," said Pune zilla parishad chief executive officer Ayush Prasad. "Every teacher was put to task, education officials, block development officers and even villagers helped in ensuring students are not left out from schooling." In fact, some teachers went door-to-door seeking information of children in the house and if they were going to school, Prasad said, adding that their efforts have made a difference. Education activist Matin Mujawar of Shikshan Hakka, said: "Schools of local self-government bodies, which are the backbone of education, suffered during the pandemic." These schools are less financially sound than private institutions, Mujawar said, adding: "The students studying there also lacked the necessary tools for online education. But, slowly, government schools recovered from the situation with a lot of self-belief." Although the number of students has increased, facilities in government schools do not seem to have developed much during the same period even though computers and internet were crucial factors during Covid lockdowns. According to the UDISE data, only 68% of schools have computers, while 28% have internet. But in private schools, 96.8% have computers and 85.9% internet.

Maharashtra govt school admissions better after pandemic
Express Townhall: ‘Awarding damages to Bombay riots victims now is like giving first aid to dead patient’
The Indian Express | 2 weeks ago | |
The Indian Express
2 weeks ago | |

The Supreme Court earlier this month said the Maharashtra government had failed to maintain law and order and protect people’s rights during the 1992-93 Mumbai riots. Speaking at a townhall hosted by The Indian Express, senior advocate Yusuf Muchhala, who represented victims of the riots, about the gradual erosion of constitutional values and the judiciary’s “failure to pull its own weight”.Q. How do you look at the recent Supreme Court judgment on the Bombay riots. Have the victims of these riots received justice?Muchhala: This is a classic case of justice delayed being justice denied. Why couldn’t the Supreme Court do anything about this earlier? Why justice cannot be done expeditiously particularly in the cases where large-scale violations of human rights have happened? To award compensation now is like giving first-aid treatment to a patient who is already dead.Q. What more do you think needs to be done by the judiciary and the state to ensure there is closure for victims?Muchhala: One positive thing about the judgment is that they have interpreted section 2 of the Legal Services Authorities Act and they did not restrict the meaning of “ethnic violence” to mean only racial discrimination but expanded it to say that any kind of civil strife will be included… Otherwise, the attempt was [to claim] that communal violence is not covered and that there is no statutory obligation to render any legal aid for the victims of communal violence. The state’s duty is to maintain law and order and it was breached and therefore the victims must be given legal aid. That is a positive aspect of the judgment as I see it.Why has the delay occurred, who is responsible for the delay and how do we remedy the situation? Due to the delay and a lapse of 30 years, it may be difficult to give victims tangible benefits. In 2008, we tried our best to identify the missing persons and their legal representatives for compensation. We came to a dead end. In 2022, things have not improved.They say everything is because of delay, then it is the judiciary’s delay as well. This matter remained pending in the Supreme Court for nearly 20 years. Why have they allowed it? Why did the judiciary drag its feet? They should be bold enough to say ‘yes, we are responsible for that’.Q. Apart from the BJP-Shiv Sena, parties like the Congress and the NCP that claim to be secular also governed Maharashtra and had the chance to implement the recommendations of the Srikrishna Commission report to bring justice to the victims. Where did they falter?Muchhala: As far as previous governments are concerned, they were taking decisions for political considerations and not on the basis of constitutional values. When the Srikrishna Commission report was submitted, the then Shiv Sena- BJP government rejected it. Later the Congress-NCP government was elected in Maharashtra. Did they implement it? They did not. In one case, of the Suleiman Bakery riot incident, we had to approach courts and seek their intervention for the then Congress government to quash a false case filed against the victims.So the criticism is applicable to all parties which have not followed the basic values of the Constitution after coming to power. They have got narrow political aims. It is in such situations that civil society needs to intervene. This intervention should be in the form of a politically conscious pressure group within society. The pressure groups are totally apolitical but see to it that your representatives really work according to the Constitution. Here the fault lies in our society. We think it is just enough to vote once in five years, that’s all.Q: You have pleaded the hijab case too. How do you foresee it panning out and what’s your take on the verdict?Muchhala: I argued the case and felt that the Karnataka High Court had got it totally wrong. The matter came to a division bench of the Supreme Court, which delivered a split verdict. I felt that the entire focus of the question was wrong. The question is not whether the hijab is an essential part of the religion. The question, after the K S Puttaswamy Vs Union of India case, is that everyone of us must have personal liberty on how to dress. Somebody believes in modesty. Why can’t they have the right to say this is the way I will protect my modesty? And I want to keep one extra piece of cloth to cover my head up to my neck and my bosom. Why can’t they have the right? And why do you feel that once you enter a school’s premises you have to keep your fundamental rights outside the classroom? Fundamental rights are all-pervasive.Q. Does the HC order go against the principles of secularism?Yes, courts have got institutional incapacity to decide what is an essential part of a religion. All our scriptures are written in ancient languages—Hebrew, Latin, Sanskrit, Ardhamagadhi—with which none of the judges have any familiarity. How can you sit in judgement on scriptures whose languages we do not know how to read or understand? I have been arguing for many years that we are a court of law and not a court of religion.In the hijab case, for instance, I may have no religion but my conscience tells me I must be modest, and therefore I am wearing it. And another fault is that you cannot assess the character of any individual by what clothes they wear. If we say that because the lady is wearing a hijab, she is backward, not modern or independent, that is wrong. Another argument is that young girls wear the hijab because of patriarchy. It may be so; we cannot rule it out. But you are punishing her for it, and denying her the right of education. So who is the victim—the girl? It is a matter of double jeopardy for her. So, is the right of education or enforced uniformity more important?Q. Maybe as a society we are not yet ready for this debate. Can we argue that modesty should have nothing to do with clothing?It is about individual choice. You are entitled to say this is not necessary for modesty. But how can you impose the choice on others? It is the right of choice. A woman has a right to wear a bikini as much as she has a right to wear a hijab. My body, my right.

Express Townhall: ‘Awarding damages to Bombay riots victims now is like giving first aid to dead patient’
Over 7 lakh students in Maharashtra to be trained by UNICEF to work towards environment
The Indian Express | 2 weeks ago | |
The Indian Express
2 weeks ago | |

Maharashtra state’s higher and technical education department on Monday in collaboration with UNICEF Mumbai announced a youth driven initiative to conserve natural resources and to work toward issues posed by climate change. Under this programme, a total of 7.1 lakh student volunteers (age group 17-25) from selected universities across Maharashtra will be empowered to work for these causes.Student volunteers of National Service Scheme (NSS) units from Mumbai University, Savitribai Phule Pune University, Nanded’ Swami Ramanand Tirth Marathwada University, Shivaji University in Kolhapur, Rashtrasanta Tukdoji Maharaj Nagpur University and Babasaheb Ambedkar Marathwada University will be made part of this project along with youth driven NGOs working in the same sector.The collaboration finalised on Children’s Day, will provide youth with training and fieldwork platforms by offering them experience of working with professional organisations working in the area. Students will be awarded fellowships, certificates, college grades, green skilling among all for their participation.Maharashtra’s higher and technical education minister, Chandrakant Patil who launched the programme at the Mumbai University’s Kalina campus on the occasion of Children’s Day, said, “India has the highest number of youth population. And we hope this young generation of today to become responsible Indians for tomorrow. The programme having tenure of three year will be in different phases wherein volunteers will be trained on topics of water conservation, environment and sustainability.”Welcoming the collaboration, principal secretary of Higher and Technical Education department, Vikas Rastogi, said, “This will instill environment-friendly habits among these youngsters and will also bring about change in the society at large. Maharashtra ranks third after Assam and Andhra Pradesh in climate change in the list published by the Council of Energy Environment and Water, India.”

Over 7 lakh students in Maharashtra to be trained by UNICEF to work towards environment