Maharashtra Education News

TN introduces new industry-centric polytechnic curriculum
Times of India | 1 month ago | |
Times of India
1 month ago | |

Sandwich courses in several disciplines to engage in industrial training for six months each in IV and VII semesters will make students job-readyThe Directorate of Technical Education (DoTE), Tamil Nadu, in its N series of curriculum revisions, plans to increase the quality of polytechnic education so that the students become employable and get better salaries. A team comprising senior faculty from polytechnic colleges, DoTE officials, and industry experts from the engineering sector prepared the revised curriculum, which will be implemented by the next academic session.Speaking to Education Times, Laxmi Priya, Commissioner, DoTE says, “A fresh industry perspective will be included in the technical education curriculum in sync with Outcome-based Education(OBE).”The focus will be on determining the learning outcome. The students will be analysed for the primary skills, knowledge, attitudes, and technical competencies gained after the course. “The curriculum design is planned by introducing relevant sandwich courses, current as well as future job roles of the sector, and collating appropriate content, and hands-on learning experiences,” adds Priya. Adding sandwich courses, for students enrolled in several disciplines to engage in industrial training for six months each in IV and VII semesters will make students job-ready. Explaining the benefits, Priya adds, “Earlier this option was limited only to students pursuing diploma in Mechanical Engineering, however, now the trend will improve as more trades are taken into the ambit. For the same reason, new course modules are introduced in diploma in Civil/Mechanical/Chemical Engineering, Mechanical (Foundry/MTMR), Automobile Engineering, Electrical-Electronics Engineering, Robotics-Automation Engineering, Textile/Ceramic/Polymer/Leather Technology Engineering.”Depending on the current industry requirements, the total number of chapters on Electric Vehicles (EV) and Smart Advance Manufacturing has increased, while chapters on boilers and water-related technologies are reduced, further adds Priya.The new elective courses in the curriculum will give flexibility to the students to pick a subject of their choice. V Karthikeyan, principal, Thiagarajar Polytechnic, Salem, says, “Inclusion of emerging subject areas- Infrastructure and applications (Smart Societies), critical design thinking, industrial automation, sustainable energy saving (AI) for development, IoT and blockchain technologies, big data – will pave way for quality training and will also foster greater industry collaboration.”“As many as five companies have signed MoUs with the state government to provide industrial training and intensive on-the-job industry exposure to students through internships and project work. The meritorious students will be offered an upgraded salary of Rs 2.5 lakh per annum, instead of Rs 1.75 average salaries that was offered earlier,” adds Priya.

TN introduces new industry-centric polytechnic curriculum
Maharashtra plans policy to let retired teachers helm 4,800 schools
Times of India | 1 month ago | |
Times of India
1 month ago | |

PUNE: The state education department's officials are drafting a policy on re-employing retired teachers in schools with less than 20 students.Commissioner of education Suraj Mandhare said they have drawn up a draft policy to seek services of retired teachers. Some procedure is necessary and specified work needs must be assigned to them."Re-employment is not possible but we are giving them some particular task which they will perform because the number of students is very less. It doesn't require a full-time teacher who can be better utilized at other vacant positions where student numbers are very high. The policy is not finaland it is under consideration," he added.After the policy takes shape, it will be decided whether it will be contractual employment or direct employment by advertising for the post. "Since they are retired teachers, there is no harm in directly dealing with them and there is no requirement of any agency. Normally, we appoint an agency because those teachers should not claim the benefits of a permanent job. These teachers are already retired so there is no question of them asking for permanent benefits," Mandhare said.Stating that 7,500 teachers are employed in 4,500 schools with fewer students, Mandhare said that with retired teachers working here, this big chunk can be utilized where there is need. Earlier, there was a proposal of shutting down these schools completely but that proposal was the other extreme of the story. In many cases, such schools cannot be clubbed because the distance is too much. Also, if the nearby school closes down, students may lose out on the opportunity to study. With this new proposal, nobody will lose their job and the students will get an education.Mandhare said, "Even new recruitments will happen because there are ample vacancies. It is a win-win situation for anyone. Nobody is losing anything. I hope this proposal will go through. After the winter session, we will sit together with the minister, secretary, and others and fine-tune it." Mahendra Ganpule, spokesperson of Maharashtra Principals' Association said that re-employment must not happen at the cost of cutting down new recruitment. "There are many students in education colleges, many people who are qualified to become teachers waiting for an opportunity. With this new policy, the government must not cut down on recruitment numbers because that will be injustice to the young generation of teachers," he added.A TOI report in September this year has said that district officers were told to identify schools having less than 20 students enrolled and check the status of their reallocation. The fresh notification in September said that information on schools that have demanded more teaching staff be identified and submitted to the department. Government teachers have opposed the government's move to shut down schools with less than 20 students and said that it was mandatory under the Right to Education act to have a primary school in a one km periphery of a village and senior schools in a 3km periphery. Teachers said that even if some rural schools had low enrolment, their existence was important to make entire villages literate. Educators said that it is against the RTE Act that has set some regulations for primary and secondary schools in the reach of students. Putting up a list and instructing them to shut down is unfair. When schools go away from homes, it immediately affects the education of girls, they had said.

Maharashtra plans policy to let retired teachers helm 4,800 schools
Just 3.7% of 4.6L candidates in Maharashtra ace TET 2021
Times of India | 1 month ago | |
Times of India
1 month ago | |

PUNE: A total of 17,322 of 4,68,679 candidates have cleared paper-1 (standard I to V) and paper-II (standard VI to VIII) of the Maharashtra Teachers' Eligibility Test (MAHA-TET) conducted in November 2021 by the Maharashtra State Council of Examination.The results were announced on mahatet.in on December 23 after a major scam rocked the earlier two MAHA-TETs. The first paper qualifies a candidate to teach in standard I to V, whereas the second paper is for those who wish to teach in standard VI to VIII. The eligibility to appear for paper-I is a diploma in education, while the eligibility to appear for paper-II is a bachelor's degree in education.The test is a gateway to a permanent job in primary schools run by the state government and the local self-governing bodies for education diploma and degree holders as well as for applying for jobs in any primary school in the state. However, TET is just a compulsory qualifying exam and doesn't guarantee a job. However, without this, no candidate can apply for the post of a primary teacher anywhere in the state as per the government resolution of November 2013.While the TET exam was held in November 21, the results were released after the TET scam broke out in December 2021. During investigation, a total of 7,874 candidates were found guilty of malpractice in the TET 2019 exam (held in January 2020). The examination council disqualified these candidates, and also prohibited from appearing in the exams in future.Shailaja Darade, commissioner, Maharashtra State Council of Examination, which conducts TET, said, "The exams were conducted following all protocols. This was before the scam came to light. However, during the evaluation of the OMR sheets, which was done afterwards, the computer scanned the OMR-based answer sheets followed by checking the same answer sheets manually to ensure that there was no error."Altogether 2,54,428 candidates appeared in paper 1 of whom 1,674 qualified and the pass percentage was 3.80%. Altogether 64,647 candidates appeared for paper-II (maths and science subject category) of whom 937 qualified with a pass percentage of 1.45%. For paper-II (social science subject), 1,49,604 candidates appeared, of whom 6,711 qualified, taking the passing percentage to 4.49%.

Just 3.7% of 4.6L candidates in Maharashtra ace TET 2021
‘Not shutting down schools with less than 20 students’
Times of India | 1 month ago | |
Times of India
1 month ago | |

NAGPUR: School education minister Deepak Kesarkar on Friday told the legislative council in a written reply that no formal decision has been taken to shut down zilla parishad schools which have less than 20 students. The starred question asked if such a decision had been taken in September by the school education department. At that time, reports in the media too circulated regarding this issue. Kesarkar denied such reports, thus making it clear that the government has not decided to shut down ZP schools with low enrolment. In Ratnagiri, just over 1,300 schools were expected to be shut and in Nashik, students had to do an agitation on October 11 to stop the closure of their school. And across the state, around 1.4 lakh students may find themselves without their original school if the decision is taken. Maharashtra has already slipped to number five in the performance ranking in the country. Kesarkar denied saying that in the performance grading index, Maharashtra was in fact at number one position in the country. Regarding the Nashik incident, the written reply stated that on October 11, the agitation was in favour of keeping the ad-hoc teaching arrangements for them intact. The issue of low enrolment, with hardly 20-odd students in an entire school, is very common in ZP schools. More so, in remote areas like Melghat or Gadchiroli. TOI has reported on many occasions about the important role these schools play in remote areas because that is the only option for them to get an education. A ZP school teacher from Gadchiroli said, “If my school closes then students will have to go the next village to study. Here, we don’t have proper transport services to ferry kids to their schools, so closure of schools will be a big loss.” A few years ago, TOI had reported about a ZP school in Wardha district where there was only one student.

‘Not shutting down schools with less than 20 students’
21-year-old medical student wins sarpanch election in Maharashtra on return from Georgia
The Economic Times | 1 month ago | |
The Economic Times
1 month ago | |

Yashodhara Shinde, 21, aspired to become a doctor and was pursuing the medical course in Georgia, but fate had something else in store for her as she returned to her village in Maharashtra, contested the sarpanch election and won it too. She now plans to work for the betterment of her village Vaddi in Miraj tehsil of Sangli district and also complete her education online. Talking to PTI, Shinde said she wants to make women self-reliant, introduce e-learning and other education tools for students, help children adopt good health habits, contribute towards the betterment of youth's aspirations and welfare of the farmers' community in the village. "I have been pursuing the MBBS course at the New Vision University in Georgia. Currently, I am in the 4th year and one-and-a-half years of the course is still left to be completed," she said. "When elections were announced in my village, locals wanted someone from our family to contest for the sarpanch's (village head) post. A decision was taken to field me for the position. I got a call from my family and I returned, contested the election and won," said Shinde. Voting for 7,682 gram panchayats in parts of Maharashtra was held on December 18. The results were declared on Tuesday. Asked about her plans as sarpanch for the development of the village, Shinde said her main focus will be to address the issues of women and make them stand on their feet. "I am of the opinion that women must get an equal chance to show what they are capable of and I would like to make them educated and independent and not rely on their male counterparts," she said. Her priority list also includes the welfare of children and their education. "I would like to expose them to e-learning and the latest pedagogies," Shinde said. "I would also like to work towards the construction of toilets in the village and facilitate easy availability of sanitary napkins for girls and women. Also, children need to adopt good health habits," she said. Shinde also said she will work with the youth on the development agenda of the village. "In the village, 70 to 80 per cent of the population is into agriculture and I would like to work for their sustainable development," she said. Asked about her medical course and how she wishes to pursue it, Shinde said she will complete her education online and her friends will also help her in the studies.

21-year-old medical student wins sarpanch election in Maharashtra on return from Georgia
Students can add names as voters on Savitribai Phule Pune University exam form
Times of India | 1 month ago | |
Times of India
1 month ago | |

PUNE: A section for new voters' registration will now be made available in the examination application form for college students. Voters can register four times a year. Savitribai Phule Pune University has started implementing this step after the higher and technical education department ordered students to register as voters while taking admission. Registrar Prafulla Pawar said, "As per the guidelines of the state government, we will be providing an additional column in the exam form for students for voters' registration. It will be implemented from the forthcoming semester onwards." Taking note of the dismal voters' registration by students of universities and colleges, minister of higher and technical education Chandrakant Patil announced the initiative in November. Patil said, "The government has issued a resolution mandating students to get their voter registration done for getting admission to colleges. As against the goal of attaining the enrolment of 50 lakh students in the higher education system, Maharashtra has an enrolment of only 32 lakh students." The state has also told educational institutions to make available on their websites voters' registration links with 'One Link-One Awareness' slogan. The link should direct the applicant to the new voter registration Form 6. The column in the form should have the tagline 'Application for Enrolment for New Voters' at the end of their admission application and examination application, the department has informed all institutions.

Students can add names as voters on Savitribai Phule Pune University exam form
How blood cancer steeled her resolve to beat it and become a researcher at the hospital that saved her
The Indian Express | 1 month ago | |
The Indian Express
1 month ago | |

When 12-year-old Komal Mohandas Kumbhalwar walked into Tata Memorial Hospital, Parel, Mumbai, on November 10, 2006, she was unaware of her life-threatening blood cancer. Then she was told that she only had a 20 per cent chance of survival. She took that chance, fighting chemo cycles and a series of relapses for 10 long years, unable to do anything that normal teens do, but doggedly pursuing her studies. That pain steeled her resolve to find a cure for her condition. And live beyond her predicted years. Her body and mind held her up long enough to undergo a bone marrow transplant (BMT), which involves infusing healthy stem cells into the bone marrow. Now Komal works as a clinical researcher on BMT therapies at the same department that gave her a new lease of life.She is now living her dream of helping children with cancer, becoming a test case herself for the clinical research team that tracks her progress and working with them to find ways of wider application of BMT treatments. “I tell scared children that if I can survive this, they can too,” she says, in between preparing for her PhD. “Right now, I am working on retrospective research projects with my BMT team,” she says.THE DELAYED DIAGNOSIS THAT PROLONGED HER PAINKomal is the second child of a farmer’s family in Maharashtra’s Amravati district and was keen to attend a Central school so that she could avail mainstream education. “We had a Marathi-medium government school. So, I decided to get admission into a renowned Central government school, Navodaya Vidyalaya, in Amravati town that provides free CBSE education and boarding,” she says, mindful about not burdening the already stressed resources of her family.But soon her dream came crashing down when in 2006 she started falling sick repeatedly. She was too feeble to even stand on her feet and started losing weight. Concerned about her deteriorating health condition, her father brought her back to their village of Dhamak, 70 km from Amravati. But even with home food and the family taking extra care of her, she did not get any better. Consultation with several doctors only meant a change of her drug regime, delaying her diagnosis. Worst of all, every doctor misread her symptoms. “For three months, I was put on a tuberculosis regime,” recalls Komal.But her father was so determined to cure her at any cost that he took her to a private children’s hospital in Nagpur. “I still remember it was Diwali the day my father decided to take me to Nagpur. I told him I just wanted to stay at home for that night. He agreed and we travelled the next morning. A bone marrow aspiration at this facility revealed that I was suffering from a type of blood cancer called Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma and was in Stage IV of disease progression,” adds she.It was too late. Her lymphatic system was badly affected, causing swelling in her lymph nodes and spleen. She was immediately referred to Tata Memorial. “My father hid my condition from me and said we were going for a vacation to Mumbai,” says Komal. And that marked the beginning of her battle against cancer that continued till 2015.CANCER IS ALWAYS COSTLY, TO THE POCKET AND TO THE BODYMumbai was entirely new to the father and daughter, who had no place to stay and found it difficult to arrange fresh, home-made food that was needed in her condition. But with the help of the hospital’s social work department, they found accommodation at the Sant Gadage Baba Ashram, Dadar. “With a huge waiting list for rooms, we found a spot in the open area. A week later, we were assigned a room where we stayed for one-and-a-half years to continue regular chemotherapy,” she says.Her initial journey of chemotherapy was painful as after each cycle, she had to be admitted for post-therapy complications and infection, which doubled the cost of treatment despite the subsidised rates for the economically backward. “Arranging funds meant the education of my brother and sister was also compromised. My mother had to rush between the village and Mumbai as she had to take care of the farm. My father had to roam day and night in search of a blood bank,” she adds.However, their struggle paid off when she responded well to the chemotherapy and was allowed to go home after one-and-a-half years. Without wasting any time, she took admission in a local school. “After such a long gap, it was difficult for me to join school as I had lost my hair due to chemotherapy, was more prone to infections and did not regain the physical strength I had prior to the cancer treatment. Still, I continued my studies with whatever strength I had. I attended school whenever possible. Otherwise, I studied from home,” she says.But more challenges were to come. Within three months of completing her first line of therapy, she developed lymphadenopathy. A biopsy confirmed a relapse. This time Komal didn’t give up her studies while undergoing chemotherapy at the district hospital as a cheaper alternative. She only went to Tata Memorial for follow-ups. She would take about three days to recover from chemotherapy, which meant she could attend school for only half a week. “I remember a biopsy was scheduled during my Class X board exam on a lymph node in my neck but I managed to take the exams with that injury. Still I scored 84 per cent and was topper in my school,” says Komal about the little triumphant moments that kept her going.CHEMOTHERAPY NO BAR TO EDUCATIONAs she wanted to become a doctor, she took up science in Class XI. But as there was no higher education institution in the village, the family shifted to Amravati town. Even during her Class XII exam preps, Komal was on weekly chemotherapy cycles, balancing her regular classes and tuitions in half a week. Again, she scored 80 per cent and was the topper in her school. Not only that, Komal cleared the medical entrance examination and was one step short of her dream to be a researcher. But her cancer again relapsed in 2012. And she missed her admission due to lack of a medical fitness certificate. “I waited it out and the following year, I took admission in biology, graduating in 2016 with distinction,” she says.Even fate had to give in to Komal’s will power and positive outlook. By now she was in complete remission. So her doctors decided to do a bone-marrow transplant to avoid a possible relapse of disease. She underwent the transplant in June 2016 and stayed for ten months at the Tata Memorial’s Advanced Centre for Treatment, Research and Education in Cancer (ACTREC) at Kharghar. But that didn’t deter her from pursuing higher studies. She applied to Tata Memorial’s Masters in Clinical Research programme. “I found it a more appropriate path to pursue my career in cancer research. This meant I had to stay in Tata Memorial premises. My parents were relieved because the doctors would be around if there was any health concern,” Komal says. She appeared for the entrance examination, got selected for the interview and made the final cut. She was lucky as the course was financially supported by the hospital’s “Childhood Care Education programme.”In 2019, Komal completed her course with a gold medal. Currently, she is working with her own doctors in retrospective research projects related to bone-marrow transplantation. “My journey may sound sad, frustrating and hectic but challenges made me grow as a person. They helped me understand self-motivation and the value of time and persistence. They made me realise the value of each breath and encouraged me to make it worthy,” says Komal, who is preparing for her PhD entrance examination on health science in haemato malignancies, a cancer that begins in blood-forming tissue, such as the bone marrow, or in the cells of the immune system. Examples of hematologic cancer are leukemia, lymphoma and multiple myeloma. “Once I complete my PhD, I may contribute to breakthrough research in blood cancer for early recovery,” she adds.

How blood cancer steeled her resolve to beat it and become a researcher at the hospital that saved her
Rs 11.5 lakh/yr median fee in private medical colleges, says expert body
The Indian Express | 1 month ago | |
The Indian Express
1 month ago | |

IN a first such survey, an expert group under National Medical Commission, the apex medical regulator, has found that the median for fees of deemed universities is Rs 21 lakh a year, almost double of the median for fees of private medical colleges at Rs 11.5 lakh a year. Median is the middle number in an ascending or descending list of numbers.There are nearly 96,000 MBBS seats in the country for 2023, of which nearly half are in the private sector (private medical colleges and deemed universities).The information made available to Parliament in a written reply by Dr Subhas Sarkar, Minister of State for Education, showed that the median fee for seats under management quota was the same as that for normal seats in private colleges as well as deemed universities. For seats under NRI quota (reserved for NRIs, Overseas Citizens of India, Persons of Indian Origin or those with an NRI sponsor living outside India), the median fee was more than double that for normal seats at Rs 24 lakhs a year in private medical colleges. The median fees for NRI quota seats at deemed universities was 50 per cent higher than that for normal seats at Rs 31 lakh a year.As for government quota seats – seats in private colleges earmarked by state governments with usually lower fees and higher qualifying ranks, the cost is one-sixth the normal fees in the private colleges and one-tenth the normal fees at deemed university, according to the reply.“The fee structure differs for different categories of seats in different states – there was a drastic difference in fee structures across the country. This made it impossible for the government to settle on a baseline fee for MBBS, hence the exercise to determine the median fee was undertaken by the expert committee,” said Dr Pravin Shingare, former head of Maharashtra’s Department of Medical Education and Research.The expert group can guide the fee regulatory authorities across the country – there are 27 fee regulatory committees from each of the states and 70 committees from each of the deemed universities.This fee, however, will not become the baseline for deciding fees for the private medical colleges in the country. In an attempt to make medical education more accessible – so that India’s needs can be fulfilled and children do not have to go abroad to study, the government has increased the number of medical seats and also reduced the cost of education in private medical colleges.Earlier this year, the National Medical Commission issued guidelines stating that the fee for half the number of seats across private colleges and deemed universities must be brought to the level of government medical colleges. In addition, the guidelines spelt out certain principles to calculate the fees for the rest of the seats. Although the NMC had said the new fee structure would be applicable from the current session, the matter is pending in court.“As of now, the existing Supreme Court judgements say that the deemed universities have a right to fix the fees of their seats in consultation with their fee regulatory committee, headed by a retired judge. Although the current matter is pending in courts, the NMC cannot unilaterally decide to fix the fees for all 100% seats. For that, the government will have to go to Parliament,” said Dr Shingare.

Rs 11.5 lakh/yr median fee in private medical colleges, says expert body
269 Maharashtra border villages have no Marathi schools; proposals stalled
Times of India | 1 month ago | |
Times of India
1 month ago | |

KOLHAPUR: Members of the Maharashtra state Marathi schools operators' association have claimed that 1,191 proposals to set up Marathi-medium schools in 269 border villages of Maharashtra that had been submitted to the education department are gathering dust since 2017. The association members held a meeting at Sangli on Wednesday. The lack of Marathi schools in the villages of five districts adjoining Karnataka is one of the major demands of the Marathi-speaking population of these villages. The Marathi-speaking people in these villages are forced to study in Kannada-medium schools or migrate to other places nearby to get their children educated in their mother tongue. Frustrated due to the alleged prolonged neglect of the state government, some of these villages had decided to merge with Karnataka, and had sought no-objection certificates from the Maharashtra government to do so. "As per the Right to Education Act, the provision of schooling in the mother tongue is mandatory. We have a large number of Kannada schools in the border villages. The Marathi people here have to carry out their day-to-day affairs in Kannada as they studied in Kannada-medium schools. Many students too prefer to take up jobs in Karnataka," said Raosaheb Patil, treasurer of the association. Patil said that after repeated demands, the Maharashtra government set up primary schools in some of the villages. "However, after completing primary education, the students are forced to study in Kannada medium. We want the Maharashtra government to let us set up secondary schools by approving the proposals immediately," said Patil. State education minister and Marathi language minister Dipak Kesarkar said, "We have taken cognisance of the demand. I have spoken to CM Eknath Shinde. We are ready to set up more primary public schools. We have stopped providing grants for secondary education. We are ready to grant permission for self-financed schools. For public secondary schools, we need to change the policy. We will ensure that the Marathi-speaking population does not feel neglected anymore."

269 Maharashtra border villages have no Marathi schools; proposals stalled
BMC warns principals of civic-run schools of action if Aadhaar cards of students not updated
The Indian Express | 1 month ago | |
The Indian Express
1 month ago | |

THE BRIHANMUMBAI Municipal Corporation’s (BMC) Education Department will take action against school principals if they fail to update the Aadhaar card of students on the dedicated portal immediately. However, the decision has angered principals of civic-run schools, who are questioning the rationale for holding them responsible for the Aadhaar cards of children studying in such schools.The letter received by several civic school principals in the city, states, “This work was expected to be completed by the schools before December 5, as per the orders issued regarding the same by the office of Deputy Director of Education. But it has come to notice that the work is not completed and because of this delay, Mumbai’s performance at the state level will fall. If this work is not completed immediately, action will be taken against you (principal).”The letter has received major flak as principals are raising questions. “It is not a school’s responsibility to ensure that a child has an Aadhaar card and that it is updated. Moreover, in many cases, the children have Aadhaar card, but it is invalid as the details mismatch,” said a school principal, adding that taking action against them for these issues is unfair.According to recently released data, over 19 lakh students studying in schools in Maharashtra do not have an Aadhaar card. While of the 2,13,58,247 children having Aadhaar cards 40,01,250 are invalid due to mistakes in their names, gender or other particulars.The Maharashtra State Headmasters’ Association already wrote a letter to the Commissioner of Education, who originally issued the order asking schools to complete uploading of Aadhaar on the student portal in November.Mahendra Ganpule, a spokesperson for the association, said, “There are many difficulties in this, starting from the unawareness and unwillingness of parents. While the risk of losing teachers is already looming over schools if Aadhaar cards do not match, there is also an order stating that the mid-day meal scheme will soon be connected to Aadhar.”BMC Education Officer Rajesh Kankal said, “Schools were given adequate time to complete the work and yet they failed. At the beginning of this month, there were over 1 lakh students whose Aadhaar cards were not uploaded. But now in a week, around 70,000 are uploaded.”

BMC warns principals of civic-run schools of action if Aadhaar cards of students not updated
MGNREGA to be combined with other schemes to empower villages, rural families in Maharashtra
The Indian Express | 1 month ago | |
The Indian Express
1 month ago | |

Maharashtra government has decided to club implementation of Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme (MGNREGA) with various schemes of other state departments that are working to overcome rural deprivation, targeted at rural families that have been identified as Below Poverty Line (BPL), as per NITI Ayog’s Multidimensional Poverty Index (MPI).This will help in holistic development of Maharashtra’s villages and the empowerment of such families under the Sampanna Kutumb Mission. The decision in this regard was taken by the Maharashtra cabinet in its meeting on Tuesday.As per the MPI, 14.9 per cent of Maharashtra population is still poor suffering from any one or more types of deprivation, a statement from the chief minister’s office said.“Every department has launched schemes to overcome one or more types of deprivation. If these schemes are combined with the MNREGA scheme, the overall objectives and scope of the schemes will increase by getting more funds from the central government,” the statement said.Women and child development, school education, tribal development, social justice, fisheries, animal husbandry, agriculture, rural development, soil and water conservation, revenue, skill development, higher and technical education, MNREGA, water resources and marketing department are selected for this scheme. A special scheme will be formed for coordination of all departments.Under this initiative, departmental officers will adopt villages or talukas that will be given the tag of Nandadeep Village and Nandadeep Taluka.

MGNREGA to be combined with other schemes to empower villages, rural families in Maharashtra
Maharashtra joins hands with NGOs to improve education standards in state-run schools
The Indian Express | 1 month ago | |
The Indian Express
1 month ago | |

The Maharashtra government has taken a slew of measures to collaborate with several NGOs to improve the standards of education imparted in government schools. According to the plan, there will be at least one NGO per district working towards better Foundational Literacy and Numeracy (FLN) among school-going children.As part of this collaboration, around 2.5 lakh “Mata Gats” (Mothers’ Groups) have been formed across the state to ensure parents’ contribution in the holistic education of children up to Class III.Further, multiple training modules are being conducted for district-level officers of the state’s school education department by some of the NGOs to ensure an effective formulation and implementation of policies.Kailas Pagare, State Project Director Samagra Shiksha Maharashtra Prashtamik Shikshan Parishad (MPSP), said, “The idea of mothers’ groups is to enable them with tactics which they can use during their day-to-day activities at home with children to ensure their learning continues. After all, learning must continue at home, post schools and the environment at home should contribute to it.”The Samagra Shiksha MPSP has launched these partnerships under the National Initiative for Proficiency in Reading with Understanding and Numeracy (NIPUN Bharat) initiative launched by the Department of School Education and Literacy of the Government of India. The idea is to involve NGOs active in the education sector by aligning their efforts with the state’s vision to improve learning outcomes in government-run schools.The collaboration will include 37 NGOs. There are 36 districts and there will be one NGO working with the MPSP. As the MPSP has a broad outline of the programme a particular district will require a targeted approach based on local needs and limitations. This gap can be bridged with an NGO already actively working in that district, officials said.The initiative of the mothers’ group is being implemented by Pratham, one of the NGOs.Hemlata Sasane, state coordinator for Pratham’s FLN project, said, “Over 11 lakh mothers from different walks of life are associated with the education of their children through this initiative. We are preparing engaging instructional videos for mothers which will be distributed through various groups. Starting from at-home teaching tactics, these also include training mothers to use the internet as a source of information…”Pratham is also part of training and encouraging older kids in self-study in five districts.Another NGO, Leadership for Equity (LFE), is working with district-level officers to strengthen the process of governance. “Our approach is to upskill people by setting processes for effective formulation and implementation of policies, already designed by the government. Various training modules are held for district-level officers for effective implementation of plans identifying local needs,” said Saiprasad Sale, Associated Director of advisory and partnerships at the LFE, which is already working in Nagpur, Pune, Nashik and Akola districts.

Maharashtra joins hands with NGOs to improve education standards in state-run schools
BJP to hold protests in Pune, Pimpri-Chinchwad against ink attack on minister Chandrakant Patil
The Indian Express | 1 month ago | |
The Indian Express
1 month ago | |

A day after a protester threw ink at Maharashtra Higher and Technical Education Minister and former BJP state president Chandrakant Patil, party workers in Pune and Pimpri-Chinchwad have decided to hold protests and demand stringent action against those behind the attack.The BJP’s Pune unit will hold a protest in front of the district collector’s office at around 3 pm, while the Pimpri-Chinchwad unit will protest in Pimpri at around 4 pm on Sunday.The minister was attacked in Chinchwadgaon around 6 pm on Saturday when he stepped out of the residence of a local BJP leader. One person threw ink on Patil’s face while two others raised slogans against his recent controversial remarks on Dr Babasaheb Ambedkar and Mahatma Jyotiba Phule. The three have been arrested by the police.Speaking at a programme in Paithan, Aurangabad on Friday, Patil said: “Those who started schools, Ambedkar, Phule… they did not depend on government aid. They started schools by going to people, and begging, by saying, ‘I’m starting a school, please give me money’.”Later in the evening, he clarified, “Who started schools? Ambedkar and Phule. This is the truth. What I meant was begging for funds is akin to present-day concepts of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), donations or crowd-funding,” adding that, “Deliberately taking statements out of context or creating controversies over words spoken in vernacular language has become a habit these days.”BJP spokesperson (Pune) Sandeep Khardekar said the party will hold a demonstration and seek strong action against those behind Saturday’s attack. “What the minister said was wrongly interpreted by some people. The same day, he came before the media and clarified his statement. Similarly, the next day he apologised for his remarks if they had hurt anyone’s sentiments,” he said.“The minister spoke eloquently about the contribution of national icons like Dr Babasaheb Ambedkar, Jyotibha Phule and Karmaveer Bhaurao Patil. A major part of his speech was dedicated to hailing the contribution of the national icons in the field of education and the nation’s development. But some people focused only on one word. The minister himself has clarified that he should not have used the word though it is commonly used in rural areas. Despite his apology, he was attacked. This is against the democratic principles of our country,” Khardekar said.Pimpri-Chinchwad BJP spokesperson Raju Durge said, “We strongly condemn the attack on our senior leader and district guardian minister. This is not Maharashtra’s culture. We are living in a democracy. If anyone has any problem with any remarks or statements made by a minister or a leader, he has several platforms to register his protest. But resorting to throwing ink or attacking the person is against the principles and values enshrined in our Constitution drafted by Dr Babasaheb Ambedkar.”Durge said that though the attack happened in the presence of police personnel, the party was not seeking action against them. “Our leader Chandrakant Patil himself said that he was not blaming police personnel for the attack… We will abide by his directives,” he added.

BJP to hold protests in Pune, Pimpri-Chinchwad against ink attack on minister Chandrakant Patil
State govt forms fresh committee, second in a year, on night schools
The Indian Express | 1 month ago | |
The Indian Express
1 month ago | |

The Maharashtra government has formed a fresh committee to draw up a comprehensive policy for night schools in the state. This is the second committee set up for the task in the span of a year. Several night schools and teachers had opposed the recommendations of the earlier committee.The new committee will have seven members, drawn from various teachers’ associations and government employees. Education Commissioner Suraj Mandhare will head the committee, which is expected to submit its report within a month.In January this year, a committee was formed by the state school education department to draw up a policy for night schools in Maharashtra. There are 155 secondary and 46 higher secondary night schools in the state catering to 20,312 students. These are students who are not able to pursue education in a traditional school. While most left their education midway to earn a livelihood, there are older students too, including women who left their education several years ago.Based on the earlier committee’s recommendations, a Government Resolution (GR) was issued in June, which reduced the timing for night schools from three-and-half hours to two hours. It also allowed teachers of day schools to work as part-time teachers in night schools at half salary, a practice banned in 2017.“By allowing this again and with changed timings, the June 2022 GR was only going to result in reduced quality of education in night schools,” said Sunil Susare, secretary of Rashtravadi Shikshak Cell, a teachers’ organisation, which was one of several associations opposing the reforms.A night school teacher from Ahmednagar had also moved the Aurangabad bench of Bombay High Court against it. Several teachers and associations held a protest at Mumbai’s Azad Maidan on Independence Day this year against the government order based on the earlier committee’s report. MLC Nago Ganar too raised the issue in the House, following which School Education Minister Deepak Kesarkar had assured to form a new committee. The GR issued on Thursday stated that it supersedes the earlier GR.

State govt forms fresh committee, second in a year, on night schools
Controversial book author Farhat Khan arrested from Pune: Madhya Pradesh home minister
The Indian Express | 1 month ago | |
The Indian Express
1 month ago | |

Dr Farhat Khan, the author of a controversial book, was arrested from Pune in Maharashtra on Thursday while she was undergoing dialysis in a hospital, Madhya Pradesh Home Minister Narottam Mishra said.The arrest was made in connection with her book named ‘Collective Violence and Criminal Justice System’, which was kept in the library of the Government Naveen Law College in Madhya Pradesh’s Indore city.The Akhil Bharatiya Vidyarthi Parishad (ABVP), the student wing of the Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh, has alleged the book being taught to law students has highly objectionable contents against the Hindu community and the RSS.According to police, Khan was suffering from a serious kidney ailment and needed dialysis on a regular basis.“The controversial writer, Farhat Khan, was arrested in Pune when she was undergoing dialysis in a hospital there.Papers (pertaining to the case) were also handed over to her,” Mishra told reporters in Madhya Pradesh capital Bhopal.Authorities have also started a probe into complaints related to another book and if any objectionable content is found, then it will also be linked with the same case, the minister said without elaborating.On December 3, the Indore-based college’s LLM student and ABVP leader Lucky Adiwal (28) filed a complaint against author Khan, the book’s publisher Amar Law Publication, principal of the institution Dr Inam-ur-Rehman and professor Mirza Mojij Baig in the matter.Earlier, an official said the Indore police had traced Khan to Pune and she was served a notice under relevant provisions of the Code of Criminal Procedure (CrPC).“After registering a case five days ago on the issue of the controversial book, we were searching for Dr Frahat Khan and had sent teams to places in Maharashtra and Madhya Pradesh,” Deputy Commissioner of Police (DCP) Rajesh Kumar Singh said.“On the basis of leads, we traced her to Pune and served her a CrPC notice, as per which she was asked to cooperate in the probe and remain present in court at the time of submission of the charge sheet,” he said.The DCP said the Indore-based author was suffering from a serious kidney ailment and needed dialysis on a regular basis.When she went from to Pune from Indore, at that time also she underwent dialysis at a hospital in Sendhwa town on the Maharashtra border, the DCP added.The ABVP had alleged the book contained objectionable content against Hindus, the RSS and promotes religious hatred.The state higher education department had formed a seven-member committee to conduct a probe into the case.A member of the committee said the panel had recorded statements of 250 students and teachers.The higher education department’s commissioner Karmaveer Sharma on Wednesday said the committee has not yet submitted its report.An appropriate action will be taken into the matter on the basis of the probe report, Sharma said.On Tuesday, a local court refused to grant anticipatory bail to the Indore-based law college principal Inam-ur-Rehman and professor Baig, both named as accused in the case.Their lawyer Abhinav Dhanotkar had said the rejection of bail would be challenged in the Indore bench of the Madhya Pradesh High Court.

Controversial book author Farhat Khan arrested from Pune: Madhya Pradesh home minister
  • Author Of Controversial Book Arrested In Maharashtra's Pune
  • Ndtv

    Bhopal: Dr Farhat Khan, the author of a controversial book, was arrested from Pune in Maharashtra on Thursday, Madhya Pradesh Home Minister Narottam Mishra said.The book named 'Collective Violence and Criminal Justice System' was kept in the library of the Government Naveen Law College in Madhya Pradesh's Indore city. The Akhil Bharatiya Vidyarthi Parishad (ABVP), the student wing of the Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh, has alleged the book being taught to law students has highly objectionable contents against the Hindu community and the RSS."The controversial writer, Farhat Khan, was arrested in Pune when she was undergoing dialysis in a hospital there," Mr Mishra told reporters in Madhya Pradesh capital Bhopal.Authorities have also started a probe into complaints related to another book and if any objectionable content is found, then it will also be linked with the same case, the minister said without elaborating.PromotedListen to the latest songs, only on JioSaavn.comOn December 3, the Indore-based college's LLM student and ABVP leader Lucky Adiwal (28) filed a complaint against author Khan, the book's publisher Amar Law Publication, principal of the institution Dr Inamur Rehman and professor Mirza Mojij Baig in the matter. (Except for the headline, this story has not been edited by NDTV staff and is published from a syndicated feed.)Featured Video Of The DayAAP Says We Are Like "Chhotu Makkhi Party", BJP Responds With "Hit" Jibe

Maharashtra: Govt asks universities to offer four-year UG courses in line with NEP
The Indian Express | 1 month ago | |
The Indian Express
1 month ago | |

FROM THE next academic year, expected to begin in June 2023, all undergraduate (UG) degree programmes in Maharashtra will have a tenure of four years, as per the National Education Policy, 2020.In a government resolution (GR) issued late Tuesday, the state higher and technical education department asked all universities to formulate regulations for the same.It also shared recommendations made by the state-level committee headed by Dr Ravindra Kulkarni, former pro-vice chancellor of Mumbai University (MU), preparing a roadmap for implementation of the NEP.According to the recommendations, a student should have option to exit or leave the four-year course after each year.For example, a student will get a certificate if exiting after completing first year, diploma if exiting after two years, bachelor’s degree after three years and bachelor’s degree (honors/reserach) after completing four years.These exists (except the final year) would be possible after completing a bridge course, which would train student in employment skills.Also, students should be allowed to choose the semesters – six in all – they want to join. If one joins the course in semester 1, the student would be allowed to exit only after completing semester 2.The one entering the course in semester 3 would be allowed to leave only after completing semester 4.This would hold true for semesters 5 and 6 too.However, many, especially teachers, have raised concerns about the recommendations.Dr Madhu Parajape, general secretary of Bombay University and College Teachers Union (BUCTU), said: “The government has failed to show any commitment toward financial aspects of these reforms in terms of fees and grants given to aided colleges. Instead, by allowing a student to leave the course in between, the government will encourage dropping out of higher education. There is already a shortage of manpower due to the government’s failure in filling up vacant posts of teachers.”BUCTU had last month taken part in the three-day protest by All India Teachers Federation against NEP, outside the UGC office in Delhi.Many teachers also pointed out the absence of academic councils and boards of studies in most universities, which are responsible to prepare a new curriculum for the reforms.While such bodies are being set up in many state universities, MU still awaits the election process to start.The universities, however, are confident of implementing the recommendations.Vice-Chancellor (V-C) of Shivaji University in Kolhapur,  D T Shirke, who is currently holding the additional charge of MU V-C, said: “There is adequate time to introduce the changes. The national curriculam framework too is ready for reference.”Dr R S Mali, former Vice Chancellor of Kaviyatri Bahinabai North Maharashtra University in Jalgaon, said, “The universities are prepared. All have been aware of the impending changes and with a prescribed roadmap, implementing the reforms should not be an issue.”

Maharashtra: Govt asks universities to offer four-year UG courses in line with NEP
  • Maharashtra sets 4-year degree plan in motion but colleges sceptical
  • Times of India

    MUMBAI: The state issued a government resolution (GR) on Monday making four-year undergraduate programmes in colleges mandatory from the next academic session. It set in motion implementation of the National Education Policy (NEP) across the state. While the GR lays down the guidelines, colleges are sceptical about the practical difficulties they are likely to face with the sudden change in the duration of all undergraduate programmes. From concerns over lack of infrastructure to manpower and lack of internship opportunities to funding, colleges claim the implementation will not be an easy ride. The GR stated the guidelines must be implemented across courses from 2023-24. While opting for the four-year degree will be optional for students, as they can exit even after completing three-years' bachelor, colleges have to mandatorily offer it, said a government official. "Initially, there will be resistance, but eventually things will ease out. If colleges are given an option, they may not want to offer a single four-year course," he added. A former vice-chancellor, though, said the sudden change in the duration of all programmes is not feasible. "The government could have made the implementation mandatory in colleges offering postgraduate courses. Such colleges could have offered the programme without any strain on their current resources," he said. The principal of a suburban college said, "Unlike other states, some of the colleges here offer several courses. The total strength of undergraduate students in some colleges exceeds 5,000 across three years. Even if 50% of the students enrolled with us in the first year wish to pursue till the fourth year, we will need additional infrastructure for at least 1,000 students." He added that this can only be partly circumvented by sending these students off for internships or projects. The workload of teachers is likely to increase, pointed out a teacher from a south Mumbai college. "There is no clarity but hopefully we will have some examples from Karnataka, as students there will graduate in the four-year programmes before us," she said. "Many of our departments do not even have permanent teachers and this is an additional burden," he said. Several colleges have started holding meetings with their management to chalk out their plans. The principal of an autonomous college said that they plan to offer the four-year option only in two to three courses initially and then extend it to other courses. The NEP also recommends delinking junior colleges from degree colleges. Most colleges in the city, though, do not have attached schools. "The college building is already occupied in two to three shifts. The government is silent on the delinking part. For standalone colleges with no attached schools, delinking will be a challenge with no additional infrastructure," said another principal.

  • Maharashtra: New Education Policy rollout from June with 4-year UG courses
  • Times of India

    PUNE: The newly appointed state director of higher and technical education, Shailendra Deolankar has said that the New Education Policy's implementation in Maharashtra would begin from June 2023 with the four-year undergraduate degree courses. Government institutions will have to prepare an institute development policy (IDP). He also said that an audit of all senior colleges in the state would be conducted that would help parents and students decide about which institute to choose. This audit will be conducted every three years. Deolankar, during an interaction with the media persons, said that such an audit was imperative and the process would soon begin. "The Public Universities Act has provision for the audit of colleges every three years which is mainly academic as well as administrative. It is the right of parents and students to get detailed information about colleges and so far, this audit has been ignored," he added. Deolankar also said that colleges will be encouraged to undergo National Assessment and Accreditation Council (NAAC) reviews. "We shall start implementing the provisions of NEP from June, next year. As per the instructions of the University Grants Commission (UGC), the four-year degree programme will be the first step for the implementation. Besides, preparing IDP of government institutions and creating a cluster of colleges for inter-disciplinary studies will also be needed." The interdisciplinary studies model will be implemented on a pilot basis at colleges in Aurangabad and Nagpur. Deolankar said, "Many colleges that are government-aided have not received the NAAC grading even once until now. We are trying to encourage more and more colleges in Maharashtra to enter the accreditation cycle. We are also explaining its procedure for their benefit. The process will have to be completed in a stipulated period of time so that maximum institutions are rated."

  • Maharashtra: Special educators without pay for 9 months, officials pass the buck
  • Times of India

    PUNE: A group of resource teachers in Maharashtra who educate students with special needs has not been paid since March. An order about releasing the honorarium for some 170 such teachers was issued by Maharashtra Primary Education Council on November 17. However, the teachers said that they have still not received the money. Pune zilla parishad officials said that they have not received the money from the Maharashtra Prathamik Shikshan Parishad while the council officials said that they have disbursed the payment to all resource teachers till November. A resource teacher from Indapur taluka was given schools under Junnar taluka to mentor. He is the sole earning member and has had to take care of his living expenses in Junnar along with his family in Indapur without getting paid for nine months. "The situation is very bad. But we can't stop our work because students will suffer. Hence, we have been working without any pay for the last nine months since March," the teacher, who has some 75 schools under him, said. Another resource teacher, who lives and teaches in Bhor taluka, said that they were recruited under a scheme of inclusive education for disabled children but last November a batch of 166 people were included in Samagra Shiksha Abhiyan under the council and later on four more people were added taking the total to 170. "We get 25,000 as an honorarium per month and we have yet to get any money. We go to schools, train teachers in inclusive education, coach students, and go to houses of pupils who cannot go to school without parental help. All the expenses are coming out of our pockets. Some teachers are extremely poor. I have nearly 100 schools under me of which 35 schools have children with special needs. I am associated with 72 children with special needs," he said. While there has been an order stating the release of money for the resource teachers, it is yet to reach the zilla parishads who will then disburse it to the teachers. Ayush Prasad, CEO of Pune zilla parishad, said they had not received the money. "After your (TOI) query, we checked our MPSP account which shows near zero balance," he said. The order further says that except for those who went to the Nagpur bench of Bombay high court and have got approved an honorarium of Rs 75,000, the remaining are due to get Rs 25,000 per month. Kailas Pagare, state project director of Samagra Shiksha, said, "We have paid salaries of all resource teachers till November. We have already transferred the money to the ZPs. If the ZP has not demanded the money, there is a chance that they may not have received it or if they were appointed by ZP and not the MPSP, then they may not have received the honorarium. Also if the teachers never did any work, they will not be paid any honorarium. However, everyone who has worked and for whom the demand was made by respective ZPs has been paid."

Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation schools record lowest dropouts in 10 years
Times of India | 1 month ago | |
Times of India
1 month ago | |

MUMBAI: The number of students dropping out of civic schools in Mumbai has reduced to a great extent in recent years. In fact, the academic year 2021-22 recorded the lowest number of dropouts in the past 10 years. Compared to more than 40,000 students who dropped out from BMC schools in 2012-13, the numbers have come down to 3,977 in 2021-22. The numbers have come down by over 60% when compared to the pre-pandemic year of 2019-20. In that year, 10,517 students had dropped out of BMC schools. BMC officials claimed that the door-to-door campaigns undertaken in the past few years have helped them to improve enrolments and to control the rate of dropouts. Praja Foundation, which collated and analysed the data, claimed the reasons for the fall in the BMC school dropout cases could vary from shutting down of other unrecognised schools to possible anomalies in numbers. For instance, M East ward, which includes Govandi and parts of Chembur, and is notoriously known for having higher dropout numbers over the last nine years, was not among the five worst wards in terms of dropouts in 2021-22. The ward also has the highest enrolment of students, almost close to 38,000. In 2012-13, most dropouts were from Kurla, Sakinaka region, Govandi, parts of Chembur and Malad-Malwani regions. In 2021-22, Matunga, Andheri West and Dadar also figure among the five wards to have higher dropouts, compared to the M East ward. Rajesh Kankal, education officer with the BMC, said that as part of the BMC's Mission Admission campaign, they have brought in several changes in BMC schools. "We even carried out door-to-door campaigns, traced out-of-school children, conducted bridge courses for them," said Kankal, adding that the initiatives helped them to improve the numbers to a great extent, especially in pre-primary level. The BMC managed to enrol 1.02 lakh students this year. Milind Mhaske, CEO of Praja Foundation, said M-East and P-North wards, which include Govandi, parts of Chembur, Malad and Malwani region, also saw closure of some unrecognised schools. "These could have probably forced parents to continue with the BMC schools in the region. But these are our assumptions," said Mhaske. Praja's report on 'Status of Municipal Education in Mumbai' Praja's report also shows that maximum dropouts were reported in Hindi medium schools, followed by Urdu and Marathi medium civic schools.

Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation schools record lowest dropouts in 10 years
Transfer certificate no longer mandatory for admission to schools in Maharashtra
Times of India | 1 month ago | |
Times of India
1 month ago | |

MUMBAI: Stressing that children should not be denied education for non-payment of fees, the state education department has directed all schools, including private ones and those from non-state boards, to admit students moving schools without insisting on the mandatory transfer certificate (TC), reports Sandhya Nair. During the pandemic, financial constraints and non-payment of fees had led to an exodus from private to aided and government schools. A circular issued Tuesday says schools should rely on birth certificates for age verification of students in classes 1-8. For students in classes 9-10, schools should try and get details from the previous school (uploaded on the portal 'Saral'). Schools from which information has been sought will have to provide details within seven days. School education minister Deepak Kesarkar hints at action if schools insist on transfer certificateSchool education minister Deepak Kesarkar on Tuesday hinted at taking action against schools that insist on transfer certificate. In a move that has surprised educational institutions, all schools have been directed to admit students moving schools without insisting on the mandatory TC. A government resolution to the effect was issued on Tuesday. Kesarkar said despite the drop in Covid cases, financial constraints continue to trouble parents who may not be able to pay fees. The state had issued a GR in June last year, directing government and aided schools not to insist on TC. Tuesday's GR covers non-state boards such as IB, Cambridge, CBSE, ICSE. The GR has come as a surprise as the academic year is nearing an end and students do not move schools now. School trustees said despite giving 25% to 30% concessions during the two years of the pandemic, parents still have to clear fee dues. "There is no question of admitting a student without a TC as parents will keep moving their children from one school to another without paying fees," said one. A school principal said the state has set up a committee to look into fee-related grievances. "Parents are approaching the committee with their grievances. Now they will simply move their children from one school to another," the principal said. While government and aided schools admitted students last year with the mandatory TC, this year schools refused to admit students without TCs. Parents said in some cases, schools hold back TCs even after fees are paid. "I wanted to change my daughter's school as I did not find the teaching up to the mark. I cleared all the dues yet the school delayed the TC," said a parent who wanted to move from a school in Goregaon. Students have the right to move from one school to another under the Right To Education (RTE) Act. The Bombay high court in March last year directed private unaided schools to not debar students from online or physical classes for non-payment of the increased component of fees for the academic year 2020-21. The state had in May last year barred private unaided schools from hiking fees.

Transfer certificate no longer mandatory for admission to schools in Maharashtra
Inspired by Gujarat’s Vidya Samiksha Kendra, centre coming up to collate data on state schools
The Indian Express | 1 month ago | |
The Indian Express
1 month ago | |

The state government is set to launch Maharashtra Shikshan Samruddhi Kendra, a centre that will collate data on government, aided and civic-run schools from across Maharashtra. The idea is to analyse the data and create a targeted roadmap to improve the standards of education imparted in these schools, said officials.To be set up on the lines of Vidya Samiksha Kendra in Gujarat, the tech set-up of the centre, along with the software, is ready to be inaugurated in Pune. The Maharashtra Prathamik Shikshan Parishad (MPSP), which has taken help from IT companies to develop the software, will track students from classes I to VIII under the initiative, said officials.A team of 20 education and technology experts will work on data analysis at the centre, which in turn will create a roadmap for each district.The government envisions having real-time performance reports of each district, school and student with the help of the software.“The idea is to be able to check the progress report of all students at this centre. As part of the Continuous Comprehensive Evaluation, schools will be asked to conduct small tests each month on whatever has been taught until then. Teachers will upload students’ performance on the software through a user-friendly cellphone application. The real-time data will help experts create a targeted plan of improvement,” said Kailas Pagare, State Project Director of Samagra Shiksha, MPSP.Aware that data can be fabricated, the MPSP has started creating awareness among teachers that this will only to help better their students’ performance.While a recently released Performance Grading Index report showed that Maharashtra schools have topped among all states, the National Achievement Survey (NAS) report declared in May leaves much to be desired.Officials said the target of MPSP is to make 30 per cent improvement in each category of NAS assessment. This centre is expected to provide a support mechanism for the ongoing process, they added.“District-level project management units have been formed, which will comprise block-level education officers and teachers. They are responsible for creating a plan for holistic development of students, which is best suited for local requirements. Involvement of parents is ensured through groups of mothers formed at village levels,” said an official.

Inspired by Gujarat’s Vidya Samiksha Kendra, centre coming up to collate data on state schools
Mumbai autorickshaw driver stuns passenger by naming all countries in Europe and more. Watch
The Indian Express | 1 month ago | |
The Indian Express
1 month ago | |

One should never judge a person by their profession or milieu. One often equates knowledge with people in high-paying jobs. However, a man driving an autorickshaw left his passenger stunned by his vast knowledge about a lot of things.A man named Rajiv Krishna shared how he was stuck in Mumbai’s infamous traffic when his driver initiated a conversation with him. Sensing that he was getting restless as he was close to his destination, the auto-driver started asking him which countries he has been to. To his utter surprise, he told him that he knows all the 44 countries in Europe. He then started rattling the names of all 44 countries in near alphabetical order. He then followed it up by naming the presidents and prime ministers of the prominent countries in Europe.“Being a native of Sindhudurg, Maharashtra, he went on to name all 35 districts of his home state. Not just that, he went on to name all 33 districts of Gujarat and all 75 districts of UP,” the caption explained. The driver then proceeded to educate him on the highlights of demonetisation, the 2G scandal and the Panama papers.“The man is named Ramdev and he is 61 years of age. He drives his rickshaw around for 8-9 hours a day just to keep himself active,” says the caption. The most surprising element of the conversation was when he got to know that he never received formal education as his family could only afford two meals a day.“All the knowledge that he had gained was through self study. He taught himself the alphabet, numbers and was blessed with the uncanny ability to retain vast amounts of information. In a parallel universe he could have been a professor with a doctorate at a top tier University,” Krishna wrote.Watch the video below:  A post shared by Rajiv Krishna (@krish_rajiv)Posted on November 7, the clip has received more than 3.82 lakh views.“I loved the way you worded the story. This video and your caption both warmed my heart,” commented a user. “Call him for your upsc exam centre ride for a quick revision,” said another. “Moments like these really humble us, the education we take for granted is a privilege that most others can only dream of,” another netizen wrote.

Mumbai autorickshaw driver stuns passenger by naming all countries in Europe and more. Watch