Maharashtra Monsoon News

Best Monsoon Fort Treks In Maharashtra For A Thrilling Adventure
India | 4 hours ago
India
4 hours ago

Best Fort Treks in Maharashtra: When we say trek, it is usually associated with mountains, valleys, snow-capped ranges, and a breathtaking view of hills covered in clouds. Treks are indeed a tryst with nature. But, for a change, how about traversing the trails to a historical landscape? How about trekking to history? The state of Maharashtra has some of the most amazing fort treks in store for a soul of an adventurer with a tinge of history buff inside.Also Read - Tirthan Valley Trek: A Handbook To Trail The Best Treks For Budding Trekker In YouJoining the trend game, fort treks offers a two in one deal- a trekking plus historical adventure. It is an expedition where one can enjoy the thrill of trekking, climbing up the hills only to reach an architectural marvel that inhabits the stories of bygone eras. Stories of dynastic reigns and how they constructed such majestic forts, only to be unfurled once you triumph over the invigorating trek to history.Image Credits: Instagram-explore.India“The Iron Fort”, in Marathi, stands tall at an elevation of about 1,033 m in the foothills of Sahyadri range in Lonavla. Lohagadwadi village is said to be the ideal spot to commence the trek from. Walking through the green covers of the land, one needs to trek up the fort’s stone steps. This fort has been passed on to through many dynasties and there are speculations that it was constructed around the 18th century. This is one of best the best picks for a monsoon trek as one is to find few wonderful waterfalls along the way.Duration– 3-4 hoursLevel- EasyA post shared by TraveloguersIndia (@traveloguersindia)Have you got guts? Because this is one of the most challenging treks which will get the adrenaline pumping. It is perched at about 4670 feet in the district of Ahmednagar. This 6th century historical site is one of the most popular treks wherein lies multiple temples as well. Taramati peak is the highest point from where one can enjoy a spectacular vista of the hills. Water cisterns, Buddhist caves and temples are the key highlights of the trek and trekkers can also camp by the caves. Ain’t it exciting?Duration – 6 hoursLevel– Moderate to difficultImage Credits: Instagram: shivneri_fort_junnarThe birthplace of Chhatrapati Shivaji, the pioneer of the Maratha empire, Shivneri is another hill fort which is also the pride of Maharashtra. The base for this trek is Junnar village from where the stimulating terrains will take you through the history of the vestiges of this fort. Apart from the spellbinding views, trekkers can visit water springs, ponds, and temples atop this fort premises.Duration – Almost one full dayLevel– MediumA post shared by Vipul Jadhav 🇮🇳 (@the_travelholic_)Built around 1500 AD, much of Korigad Fort’s beauty stands intact than its other counterparts in the state. It is said to be named after its presiding deity, Koraidevi. It is said that Shivaji Maharaj had captured these forts and kept Korigad fort even after the Treaty of Purander, highlighting the importance of this fort the Maratha king. There are some beautiful temples, two lakes atop the fort, and marvelous panoramic view of the Amby Valley.Duration – 1.5- 2 hoursLevel– Easy to MediumA post shared by insta_trending_status (@insta_trending_status)Located near Igatpuri, another popular weekend getaway in Maharashtra, Harihar fort trek is not for the faint hearted. This trek is quite riveting due to its intriguing geographical tracts. This one is a whole geometry in itself. It’s resting rock is triangular in shape, the base is rectangular, and the vertical trekking walls have steps carved into a rock. Unequivocally, the monsoon season brings out the best scenes in this trek and  if guided well via a local, it would only add to the unforgettable experience.Duration– Almost a dayLevel– Medium to hardImage Credits: PixabayNestled in the exquisite greens of the Western Ghat in Mahad, Raigad Fort offers a mesmerising trekking experience. Towering in its glory at an elevation of about 2700 feet, more than 1400 steps are carved into the mountains for the trekkers to traverse and triumph. Abundant with rich history, it is advised to hire a local guide for a thorough tour. A highlight of this trek is that you can sit in the ropeway and slide down the fort immersed in its swooning beauty.Duration – 1 dayLevel– EasyNote: The duration of the treks are written with a general estimation. It might vary depending upon individual speed and stamina.Sounds exciting? Let’s trek to history. Jai Maharashtra!

Best Monsoon Fort Treks In Maharashtra For A Thrilling Adventure
Truant monsoon can put pressure on prices, GDP, say expert
Times of India | 1 day ago
Times of India
1 day ago

NAGPUR: The Southwest Monsoon this year has started on an erratic note, and is presently lagging behind schedule. Experts fear that the monsoon deficiency is going to further increase pressure on food prices, which are already high. At a webinar organized by Delhi-based climate communications initiative Climate Trends on Friday, experts raised concern over skewed rainfall distribution, which is likely to have an impact on the sowing process. According to them, the stress would be more over Northwest India, which has been dealing with prolonged dry spells. “Situation is not very pleasant in parts of East and Central India, as there is a high deficit. Further, with high humidity, the threat of pest diseases also looms large,” they said. India has been witnessing extreme weather conditions of rainfall deficit in most parts of the country and simultaneously witnessing massive flooding in Northeast India. This has brought focus back on the high monsoon rainfall variability, which has been a cause of concern for the country, which employs 50% of its workforce in rain-fed dependent agriculture. Experts say, the number of dry days has increased during the four-month long season, while rainy days have reduced. However, extreme weather events have increased. Although, in the last three years (2019-2021), India recorded normal to above normal rainfall, but variability in dispersal of monsoon rains has been ever high. With climate change here to stay, scientists and experts have called for new agricultural practices and technologies which are climate resilient. “Easterly winds, which are responsible for bridging monsoon rains, have been completely absent so far in June. We are witnessing southwesterly winds, which have taken rains from Odisha, West Bengal and Jharkhand to Northeast India. We are not expecting easterly winds for the next 4-5 days as well, which is a cause of worry for the northern region,” said RK Jenamani, senior scientist, National Weather Forecast Division, India Meteorological Department (IMD). The Southwest Monsoon is a key influencer in the country’s economy, especially for the 18% Gross Domestic Product (GDP) share from agriculture, along with allied industries. This period coincides with the sowing season for India’s main cropping season named Kharif, for rice cultivation. Over 40% of the sown area of India is still dependent on rain-fed irrigation. Experts also raised concern on this. “Kharif sowing has been affected because of the prolonged dry spell that still continues, while the northeast region is bearing the brunt of extreme heavy rainfall. Meanwhile, for the rest of the country sowing is in process. However, there is a cause for worry as Maharashtra is highly deficit by 41%,” said Devinder Sharma, agriculture trade policy analyst, adding that there is a need for climate smart technology, which should be in sync with agriculture, which accounts for one-third of greenhouse gas emissions. A 1% change in monsoon rainfall will result in 0.34% change in India's agriculture-driven GDP that year, said Abinash Mohanty, programme lead, risks and adaptation, Council for Energy Environment and Water said. “A normal monsoon can increase GDP from the transport, storage, trade and communication sector by 1% and 3% in the agri-dominated states. Our electricity generation can decrease by 13% in case of weakened monsoon. These numbers are a concern but we need to build resilience through systems, technology and financial innovations. System innovations can help improve the state’s capacity to predict, prepare and respond to extreme events,” added Mohanty.

Truant monsoon can put pressure on prices, GDP, say expert
Mumbai's Drinking Water Stocks Dip Below 10 Per Cent, Current Supply Can Suffice 38 Days: BMC
India | 1 day ago
India
1 day ago

Mumbai: The Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation announced that Mumbai has 38 days of water reserves remaining in the lakes supplying the city. June indicates the end of a sultry and hot summer and the beginning of the monsoon season in Mumbai, however this year’s rains have gotten off to a rough start, with Mumbai receiving only 177 millimeters of rain so far, which is meager compared to the 570 millimeters the city should have received.Also Read - Ranji Trophy Final: Yash Dubey, Shubham Sharma Power MP On Verge of First-innings LeadHowever, the implications of a patchy monsoon system is that Mumbai’s catchment areas, which consist of seven lakes which supply the city with water throughout the year, have also not received ample rains for this time of the year. The BMC stated that the city has just 38 days of water reserves remaining, and now all eyes are on an Upper Air Cyclonic Circulation forming in the Arabian sea, which is forecasted to give extremely heavy rains along the Maharashtra coast over the next few days. Also Read - Spine-Chilling Video: Teenager Falls Off Local Train, Escapes Death by Inches | WATCHA good monsoon system will deposit 2422 millimeters of rain between the months of June and September. This amount of rain is enough to satisfy the 15 lakh million liters of water that Mumbai requires yearly to avoid water cuts. However, the problem in recent years has not been a lack of rains in Mumbai, but rather in the catchment areas. Also Read - Rebel Shiv Sena Leader Eknath Shinde Likely To Return To Mumbai From Guwahati, To Meet Deputy SpeakerDue to climate change, the rains during the monsoon have deposited large amounts of water in very short amounts of time, and the storms that impact Mumbai are often slow moving and fizzle out before they reach key catchment areas in places like Bhatsa. Despite the fact that a normal monsoon season is predicted for Mumbai, it doesn’t translate into a good haul of rainfall for the catchment areas, leaving Mumbai and its surrounding suburbs at risk of running dry during the summer months.Since the Monsoon onset was declared on June 11th, Mumbai has been receiving patchy rain with cloudy skies, keeping the humidity uncomfortably high with relatively dry days.Written By: Shaurya Sharma

Mumbai's Drinking Water Stocks Dip Below 10 Per Cent, Current Supply Can Suffice 38 Days: BMC
Deficient June rainfall deals blow to kharif sowing
The Indian Express | 1 day ago
The Indian Express
1 day ago

Kharif sowing in the country has taken a massive hit due to lack of rains. Data released by the Union government on Friday showed 140.52 lakh hectares of sowing as against 184.44 lakh hectares last year. And with the southwest monsoon likely to continue in its weak phase till the end of June, there is growing uncertainty over this year’s remaining kharif sowing.India’s highest regional rainfall deficiency of minus 31 per cent (from June 1 to June 24) is being reported from the central India region, covering Gujarat, Maharashtra, Madhya Pradesh, Chhattisgarh, Jharkhand and Odisha.“Except Marathwada, most areas in central India are under stress due to deficient rainfall received in this season so far. There are no favourable systems likely to form that could bring rains over central and interior peninsular India, at least till the end of June,” said Medha Khole, scientist, India Meteorological Department (IMD), Pune.This could mean that deficient June rainfall resulting in poor soil moisture could hit major kharif cultivation areas in the country.Among the kharif crops, oilseeds have taken the maximum hit with the country reporting 47.45 per cent year-on-year dip. Only 11.48 lakh hectares of area has come under oilseed from last year’s 22.41 lakh hectares. Similarly, rice (19.59/36.03 lakh hectares), pulses (8.70/13.62 lakh hectares), coarse cereals (11.08/18.06 lakh hectares) and cotton (31.83/37.84 lakh hectares) have reported dip in sowing. The only crop that has reported a positive growth is sugarcane with farmers taking the cash crop over 50.74 lakh hectares this season as against 50.16 lakh hectares last year.While the sowing window of oilseeds such as soybean and pulses like tur is far from over, growers of moong and urad are a worried lot. The sowing window of these two crops closes by June-end as against soybean, cotton, tur and other crops that can be sown till the end of July. Farmers in most states are waiting for enough soil moisture to accelerate their sowing operations.Since the monsoon onset over Kerala on May 29, a majority of rainfall recorded has been either due to western disturbances and allied systems or convective activities resulting in thunderstorms — that too, as late as in third week of June.Last week’s record rainfall over Assam and Meghalaya was predominantly due to southerly winds from the Bay of Bengal. Earlier this week, an interaction of active western disturbances caused snow, heavy rain and hail over parts of Jammu and Kashmir, Himachal Pradesh and Ladakh. Rainfall along the west coast too picked up over the last few days.All these high rainfall events collectively pushed the all-India weekly rainfall (June 16 – 22) to +45 per cent – the first week with surplus rainfall this year. But seasonal rainfall remained 4 per cent short of normal (till June 24) after touching the normal figure for a day on Thursday. So far, India has recorded 115.2mm rainfall.On the monsoon’s further advance, Khole said that there was no progress likely during the next three to four days. This means that the monsoon would reach Delhi only around the normal onset date, which is June 30.Meanwhile, the Met department has warned of thunderstorms with moderate intensity rainfall over Uttar Pradesh and Uttarakhand on June 27 and 28. Rainfall will continue along the west coast during the next five days.

Deficient June rainfall deals blow to kharif sowing
Missing easterly winds leave Northwest rain deficit, Northeast deluged: IMD
The Indian Express | 1 day ago
The Indian Express
1 day ago

Easterly winds that bring monsoon to Northwest India have been absent, resulting in the dry spell in North India in June, the India Meteorological Department (IMD) said on Friday. In absence of easterly winds, southwesterly winds took the monsoon clouds to Northeast, resulting in excessive rainfall and floods there.While the all-India rainfall was 4% deficient, Assam and Meghalaya experienced 1,000mm last week. Other parts of the Northeast, including Manipur, Tripura; sub-Himalayan West Bengal and Sikkim also received heavy rainfall.“All India rainfall shows little change, and that’s a very good sign. But the number of dry spells are increasing as well as the pockets of extremely heavy rainfall are also increasing. The variability is high and this is worrying.We are not expecting easterly winds for the next 4-5 days as well,’’said Dr R K Jenamani, Senior Scientist, National Weather Forecast Division, IMD.Although, in the last three years (2019-2021), India has recorded normal to above normal rainfall but variability in dispersal of Monsoon rain has been ever high. Abinash Mohanty, Programme Lead, Risks and Adaptation, Council for Energy Environment and Water, said that 75% of the country now falls under extreme weather hotspots, with six climatic zones, 27 states, 463 districts and over 638 million Indians vulnerable to extreme weather events.“As much as 45% landscape disruption has taken place resulting in micro-climatic events. So, areas that were earlier drought prone are now becoming flood prone as well and vice versa. India is currently going through dry epoch rainfall with the number of dry days increasing. A 1% change in monsoon rainfall will result in 0.34% change in India’s agriculture-driven GDP that year,’’ said Mohanty.The Southwest monsoon is a key influencer in the Indian economy, with 18% GDP share from agriculture, along with allied industries. This period coincides with the sowing season for India’s main cropping season named Kharif, for rice cultivation. Over 40% of the sown area of India is still dependent on rain-fed irrigation.“Kharif sowing has been affected because of the prolonged dry spell that still continues. Worryingly, Maharashtra is highly deficit in rainfall by 41%. This variability in rainfall dispersal has an impact on food production. Sowing intensity gets affected, while increased humidity levels lead to several diseases,” said agriculture trade policy analyst Devinder Sharma.Reiterating Sharma, Dr Anjal Prakash, Research Director, Bharti Institute of Public Policy, said even in the Himalayan region, the shift in climate has resulted in a shift in agriculture as well as the kind of crops that are being grown. “The effect on agriculture has been disastrous, and people are leaving these regions and migrating to nearby towns and cities where they live in abysmal conditions,’’ said Prakash.Meanwhile, the Met Department has warned of thunderstorms with moderate intensity rainfall over Uttar Pradesh and Uttarakhand during June 27 and 28. Rainfall will continue along the west coast during the next five days.

Missing easterly winds leave Northwest rain deficit, Northeast deluged: IMD
Delhi weather today: Light rain likely in several parts of the city, says IMD
The Indian Express | 4 days ago
The Indian Express
4 days ago

With rains seen in parts of Delhi over the past four days, temperatures continue to be recorded well below normal.On Wednesday, the minimum temperature, which is recorded early in the morning, was 24.3 degrees Celsius, four degrees below normal. According to India Meteorological Department (IMD) officials, the maximum temperature will settle at around 36 degrees Celsius, three degrees below the expected level at this time of the year.Light rain is also likely in several parts of the city.The IMD forecast says that rain is not expected for the coming 4-5 days and by the weekend, the temperatures will be back up to around 39 degrees Celsius. The lull, however, is expected to be short-lived, as the monsoon is expected to hit the city between June 27-30.Rainfall data collected between June 1 and June 21 shows that Delhi and Uttar Pradesh are the only two states in the country where rains are more than 60% deficient, falling in the Large Deficient category. Fifteen states come under the deficient category, with a deficit of up to 59%. This includes Himachal Pradesh, Uttarakhand, Maharashtra and Gujarat.In Delhi, only the east zone has got excess rainfall, while the other zones are either in the Deficient or the Large Deficient categories.

Delhi weather today: Light rain likely in several parts of the city, says IMD
  • IMD Warns of High Rainfall in Coastal Maharashtra, Goa, Issues Orange Alert
  • India

    New Delhi: The India Meteorological Department (IMD) on Tuesday issued an orange alert for coastal areas of Maharashtra and Goa for extreme rainfall till June 25 at least. Several places along the Maharashtra, Goa and northern Karnataka coast have already witnessed heavy to very heavy rainfall.Also Read - Uddhav Thackeray Govt in Trouble? Here's What's at Stake & How Numbers Stack Up in Maharashtra Assembly | EXPLAINEDIn the 24 hours ending at 8.30 a.m. on Tuesday, Maharashtra’s Palghar received 210 mm rainfall, and Dahanu 130 mm, Goa’s Mormugao and Dabolim received 70 mm, each while along the coastal Karnataka, Manki received 100 mm, Udupi 90 mm, and Honavar 80 mm among the several stations that recorded more than 50 mm rainfall in 24 hours. Also Read - Amid Political Crisis in Maharashtra, Eknath Shinde Changes Twitter Bio, Says Will Never Cheat For Power“Under the influence of offshore trough and strong westerly winds along the west coast in lower tropospheric levels, fairly widespread/widespread rainfall with thunderstorm/ lightning is very likely over Karnataka, Konkan and Goa, Kerala, Mahe, and Lakshadweep and scattered to fairly widespread rainfall is likely over central Maharashtra, Marathwada, Andhra Pradesh, Yanam, Telangana, Tamil Nadu, Puducherry, and Karaikal during next five days,” the IMD forecast said. Also Read - Maharashtra Crisis: Names of 26 MLAs Who Have Gone ‘Missing’ With Eknath Shinde | Full List HereThe orange alert is applicable till June 25, the IMD said and added – as part of its impact-based warning – that people should be alert about localised landslides/ mudslides, damage to horticulture and standing crops in some areas due to inundation and, most important, be cautious about flooding in some river catchment areas.

  • IMD Issues Heavy Rain Alert for Mumbai, Thane on Tuesday; Says Monsoon in Delhi Around Usual Date
  • India

    Mumbai: The weather office on Monday issued an ‘orange alert’ to Mumbai and Thane for very heavy rainfall till June 21. The orange-colour coded warning for heavy rains on June 20-21 was issued for the coastal districts of Ratnagiri and Sindhudurg, the India Meteorological Department (IMD) said. The IMD has four-colour coded alerts, namely green (no warning), yellow (watch), orange (alert) and red (warning).Also Read - Good Day For India Inc: Three Indian Cities Make To Top 40 Startup Hubs In The WorldMeanwhile, meteorologists said that the southwest monsoon will reach Delhi around its usual date, June 27, and the rain deficit will be compensated for by June end. Pre-monsoon showers over the last three days have brought down the rain deficit in Delhi to 34 per cent. The city has gauged 23.8 mm of rain as against the normal of 36.3 mm since June 1, when the monsoon season starts. All of it came in the last four days. Also Read - Rain Alert, Thunderstorm In These States For Next 5 Days, Full IMD Forecast HereA cyclonic circulation will come up over parts of West Bengal, north Odisha and adjoining Bangladesh in the next two to three days which will change the wind pattern in the Indo-Gangetic plains, said G P Sharma, president (meteorology), Skymet Weather. “This cyclonic circulation will initiate the typical easterly flow which is crucial for the advance of the monsoon into northwest India. Delhi will get the first monsoon rains around the usual date, if not exactly June 27,” he said. Also Read - Maharashtra: Man, Son Held For Repeatedly Raping Teenage Niece From UP(With inputs from PTI)

  • Mumbai: IMD forecasts season’s first heavy rainfall Sunday, issues yellow alert
  • The Indian Express

    The first heavy rainfall of the season in Mumbai is likely on Sunday. The India Meteorological Department (IMD) has issued a yellow alert warning of heavy rain at isolated places in Mumbai, Thane and Palghar on Sunday and Monday.On Thursday, the Southwest monsoon covered almost the entire state. “Given active monsoon conditions, rainfall activity over Konkan and the adjoining ghat areas of Madhya Maharashtra is expected to gradually increase from 18th June, 2022. Widespread rainfall activity with heavy to very heavy rainfall at isolated places is expected over the region during the period,” the IMD forecast stated.According to the seven-day forecast, intermittent light to moderate rain will continue in the city till Sunday. A wet spell began on Wednesday night in Mumbai with a few short but intense spells of rainfall. Several parts of the city experienced rain activity on Wednesday night and Thursday morning, with low-lying areas of Kurla and Sion witnessing localised flooding.In the last 24 hours ending at 8:30 am on Thursday, 12 mm rainfall was recorded at the IMDs Santacruz observatory, which represents the entire city. High relative humidity at 92 per cent was recorded on Thursday morning, the agency said, adding that the city also saw above-normal maximum and minimum temperatures at 331.1°C and 26.5 °C respectively. Since June 1, the city has logged 94.3 mm of rainfall, which is 114.1 mm below normal.On Thursday, the Southwest Monsoon advanced further into some more parts of the north Arabian Sea, Gujarat, entire Madhya Maharashtra and Marathwada, some parts of south Madhya Pradesh, most parts of Vidarbha, entire Telangana, some parts of south Chhattisgarh and south Odisha, most parts of Coastal Andhra Pradesh, some more parts of West-central and the northwest Bay of Bengal.With the increase in the rainfall activity along the west coast, the IMD has also issued a warning to fishermen. “Squally weather with wind speed reaching 40-50 kmph (and) gusting to 60 kmph is likely to prevail along and off North Maharashtra coast on June 20. Fishermen are advised not to venture along and off (the) North Maharashtra coast during the above-mentioned period,” the IMD stated.

NAGPUR: Heavy rains on Monday, more expected in week
Times of India | 5 days ago
Times of India
5 days ago

NAGPUR: Monsoon made inroads into Vidarbha as heavy showers were witnessed in Nagpur and other parts of the region. According to met department, the rainy season has officially commenced on June 16 in the region. Heavy rains hit Nagpur around 7 pm on Monday accompanied with thunder and lightning, bringing relief from the hot day. As per the data of Regional Meteorological Centre (RMC), Nagpur, the city has received 11.6 millimetres rain till 8.30 pm. All districts of Vidarbha witnessed good rainfall, Gondia being the wettest after Arjunimorgaon recorded as much as 32.6 mm rainfall. Monsoon has brought down the soaring mercury levels. On Friday, the maximum temperature of Nagpur was 33.1 degree Celsius. Gondia was the coolest at 30 degree Celsius while Buldhana was at 31. Wardha recorded the highest maximum temperature of 36 degree Celsius. Forecast suggests that Nagpur and other districts will receive ‘widespread’ to ‘fairly widespread’ rainfall in the coming week. Meteorologically, widespread refers to around 76-100% stations recording rains while fairly widespread signifies 51-75% stations reporting rainfall. The maximum temperatures of Nagpur will be below 35 degree Celsius. According to the national weather forecast, heavy rainfall is expected at Konkan, Goa, central Maharashtra in next five days.

NAGPUR: Heavy rains on Monday, more expected in week
  • Pune weather: Widespread rain likely over ghat areas, city to witness light rain from today
  • The Indian Express

    After having had to wait longer to enjoy the monsoon rains, Pune residents on Monday woke up to cloudy skies as officials with the India Meteorological Department (IMD) said the city could receive some rainfall starting Monday. The department has forecast widespread rainfall with some intermittent intense spells on the day along the district’s ghat areas.Since the onset of monsoon over the state nearly ten days ago, the southwest monsoon had remained feeble resulting in a rain deficit of 56 per cent (June 1-19). Pune district has seen a rainfall deficit of 67 per cent for the same period.However, this week onwards the ocean-atmospheric conditions are expected to turn conducive and bring some much-needed rainfall. Monsoon winds are set to strengthen too.“There are significant amounts of moisture incursion happening over western regions of our state due to strong westerly winds blowing from the Arabian Sea. This will lead to widespread rainfall over Konkan and Madhya Maharashtra, including Pune. There could be isolated heavy spells on Monday over these regions,” said Anupam Kashyapi, head of the weather forecasting division at IMD, Pune.Due to overcast sky conditions, Pune city’s humidity levels recorded during the morning hours on Monday were above normal and ranged between 70 – 84 per cent. The minimum temperatures too remained 23 to 26 degrees Celsius over various parts of the city.The Regional Meteorological Centre, Mumbai, has issued a nowcast (valid for three to six hours) on possible heavy rain spells over Mumbai, Thane, Raigad and Palghar till Monday afternoon.

With advent of rains, power firms in Mumbai on alert to tackle any emergency
Times of India | 6 days ago
Times of India
6 days ago

MUMBAI: With the advent of monsoon, all power utility firms in Mumbai are on alert. Adani Electricity activated its Central Disaster Control Centre this month to address any emergencies that are reported during the season. The team will work 24x7 towards ensuring minimal supply downtime and quick turnaround on incidents reported. Tata Power has carried out earth leakage tests at more than 10,000 feeder pillars, and junction boxes to improve public safety. A special drive was taken for tree trimming near Tata Power distribution substations to avoid them from falling on electrical installations. "Adequate dewatering pumps installed at all distribution and consumer sub-stations to avoid flooding," an official said. Officials from BEST undertaking, which supplies power to 10.5 lakh consumers in island city, said they were also "monsoon ready". MSEDCL, which has consumers between Bhandup and Mulund, had also issued its helplines and appealed to citizens to stay safe from flooding, short circuits and shocks during the rains. " We have carried out pre-monsoon checks and conducted preventive maintenance of equipment, including raising equipment identified within low-lying areas," said a senior official from Adani Electricity, which has 29 lakh consumers in suburbs. It has also installed the water level sensors across 125 locations that have been identified as very critical. Besides, Quick Response Teams (QRT) have been strategically deployed for emergency situations during heavy rains. Said a Tata official: "Substations have been equipped with a rescue boat and life jackets in case this is required during heavy flooding in the city." Said a BEST official: "This is the time to replace damaged electrical components like switches, plug sockets. Do not touch loose electrical wires or switches with wet hands. If you see any sparks in the meter cabin, streetlight poles or distribution pillars during rains, do not touch them and alert our control rooms." Added a MSEDCL official: "Ensure that the meter cabin providing electric supply to the premises is adequately protected from waterlogging or leakage. Put off the main switch in case there is water logging or leakage observed in the meter cabin."

With advent of rains, power firms in Mumbai on alert to tackle any emergency
IMD issues orange alert, #MumbaiRains trends on social media
The Indian Express | 6 days ago
The Indian Express
6 days ago

After a relatively slow start to the monsoon, Mumbai saw heavy rains on Sunday night and Monday morning.As reported by The Weather Channel, “Since the beginning of the monsoon period on June 1, the inactive phase of monsoon has led to Maharashtra recording just 40.3 mm rainfall so far this month — a 57% ‘deficit’ compared to its long-term average for the period between June 1 and 18, which stands at 93.4 mm.”On Monday morning, the India Meteorological Department (IMD) issued an orange alert for Mumbai, Palghar, Thane, Raigad, Ratnagiri and Sindhudurg. The orange alert is issued when a region is expected to experience heavy-to-very heavy rainfall consecutively for three days.Several Mumbaikars welcomed the heavy showers by posting pictures of the rains online and by sharing memes.very heavy rains in Mumbai. #MumbaiRains pic.twitter.com/kG85RNUh98— जय जवान जय किसान 🇮🇳 (@FalanaDikhana) June 20, 2022Beautiful Rain from my Balcony. #rain #MumbaiRains pic.twitter.com/cdaDZBTCb2— Rahul Ramesh Rangari (@rahulrrangari) June 20, 2022Mumbai ki pehli baarish and water logging shuru, yeh silsila toh poorana hai. #mumbairains #Monsoon #Mumbai #MumbaiWeather— Yash Hurkat (@YashHurkat) June 20, 2022#MumbaiRains is like arranged marriage, everyone celebrating on the 1st day, and then…— Gabbbar (@GabbbarSingh) June 20, 2022#MumbaiRains from my window watching the rains is a sheer joy and happiness for me pic.twitter.com/u5EczIDjoJ— rajennair (@rajennair) June 20, 2022Rains in Bombay pic.twitter.com/lBp2RvuygP— Ranjit Kumar (@RanjitOne) June 20, 2022Mumbaikar anixously waiting for monsoon to arrive.Mumbaikar after few hour of incessant rain.Thanks BMC for their impeccable and impressive works of flooding mumbai in record time as always.#MumbaiRains pic.twitter.com/P8e4QnN62l— Patrik (@Patrik26505229) June 20, 2022Earlier on Sunday, the IMD had advised Mumbai residents to take precautions for the impending heavy rains. In a media statement, an IMD official said, “The city may get around 130 mm of rainfall over the next two or three days, which is not alarming by Mumbai standards, but it could cause waterlogging.”While the pleasant change in the weather provided by rains has been welcomed by one and all, Mumbai rains are also known to cause waterlogging and traffic snarls.

IMD issues orange alert, #MumbaiRains trends on social media
Poor monsoon could spell disaster for India’s agriculture-based economy, say experts
Times of India | 1 week ago
Times of India
1 week ago

NEW DELHI: Already reeling under the after-effects of tormenting heatwaves, India cannot afford to have a poor monsoon which could spell disaster for its agriculture-based economy, experts have said, hoping a revival of monsoon rains will ease food inflation and ensure food security. The monsoon accounts for around 70 per cent of the country's annual rainfall and irrigates 60 per cent of its net sown area. Nearly half of the population depends on agriculture directly or indirectly. A bad monsoon invariably means bad crop production and inflation. An early onslaught of heatwaves has already impacted rabi crops, prompting the government to curb wheat exports and cut output predictions by roughly 5 per cent - from 111.3 million tonnes to 106.4 million tonnes. Another disruption in the weather pattern can have serious consequences in terms of the country's food security. While the MeT office has predicted a normal monsoon for the fourth year on the trot, its slow progress in the first half of June sparked fears about a delay in the sowing of crops such as paddy. However, the weather department says it is expected to pick up pace and compensate for any deficiency. The prediction is good and the rainfall is picking up. The countrywide rainfall deficit has decreased from 43 per cent on June 11 to 18 per cent on June 17, said Mrutyunjay Mohapatra, Director General (D-G), India Meteorological Department (IMD). "Normal rainfall activity will continue in peninsular India, east and central parts of the country and the Northeast," he said, adding that the precipitation in northwest India will increase after June 23. Mohapatra said monsoon never leads to an even rainfall distribution across all regions. "If we look at spatial distribution, some areas will get less rainfall; some will get more. The quantum will be normal and that is what we have predicted," the IMD D-G said. He said La Nina conditions, considered good for the monsoon, will continue till the end of the season, but will be countered by the projected negative Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD), known for obstructing the progression of the monsoon over India. "The net result will be a normal monsoon," the meteorologist added. G P Sharma, president (meteorology), Skymet Weather, said it looked like the monsoon had hit a roadblock as it entered the third week. The country received deficient rainfall as far as the agriculture sector is concerned, he said, attributing the sluggish start to the absence of a "driving system like offshore trough, cyclonic circulation, among others". But that is going to change soon. A cyclonic circulation will come up over parts of West Bengal, north Odisha and adjoining Bangladesh in three to four days which will change the wind pattern in the Indo-Gangetic plains, the meteorologist said on Friday. "This cyclonic circulation will initiate the typical easterly flow which is crucial for the advance of the monsoon into northwest India," he said. Central parts of the country, including Maharashtra, Madhya Pradesh, adjoining Telangana, Chhattisgarh and Jharkhand, are the core monsoon rain-fed area and therefore, are the most vulnerable. "Farmers in Punjab and Haryana do not depend on monsoon. They have their resources and irrigation network -- tube wells, canals, among others. Whereas central India eagerly waits for monsoon rains," he said. A delay in the monsoon poses a greater risk to Maharashtra, as it is a large state stretching from the Konkan coast to Vidarbha and has diverse weather conditions. "But the situation is becoming better. The disappointing phase has ended at least for the month of June. The rain-fed areas are expected to do well," Sharma said. Principal Scientist and Professor, Indian Agricultural Research Institute (IARI), Vinod Sehgal said rainfall deficit will be compensated by the end of June. "The outlook is good and it appears to be reviving. We should get good rains in July. The situation is not so concerning. A large rainfall deficit that extends into the first week of July is considered disastrous for the Kharif crop," he said. A good rainfall is all the more necessary because the prolonged heatwaves have sucked the moisture from the soil, the scientist said. Sehgal attributed the food inflation to heatwaves and volatile global markets. Globally, the demand for wheat grew due to the Russia-Ukraine war. The two nations together export a quarter of the world's wheat. The increase in crude oil prices and the weakening of Rupee also leads to diversion of a substantial amount of foodgrain for the production of bio-ethanol which in turn leads to food inflation, the IARI professor explained. Food and trade policy expert Devinder Sharma said deadly heat waves have already hit the wheat yields this year and the country needs a normal monsoon for adequate rice production. Punjab has 98 per cent of its crop area under assured irrigation. But not all regions of the country have this advantage, he said. The monsoon has been sluggish in the first part of June, with the rainfall deficit piling up to 80 per cent in some parts of the country. It will certainly impact the yield, Sharma said. "Reports suggest that the second half of the monsoon will be volatile. Some reports say the rainfall deficit will continue over the next two months. It does not paint a very good picture. "If the rainfall deficit continues into the second and third week of July, it will have serious ramifications. Let us be very clear, we cannot afford another disruption in the weather pattern. If it happens, we won't be able to bear the consequences," he warned.

Poor monsoon could spell disaster for India’s agriculture-based economy, say experts
Maharashtra: Cops conduct mock drill of disaster management team
Times of India | 1 week ago
Times of India
1 week ago

NASHIK: The Nashik rural police have organised a mock drill of the disaster management team in Saikheda to check its preparedness for rescue operations during the floods as the town witnesses floods frequently during the monsoon. During the demonstrations, the disaster management teams exhibited the swiftness with which they could act to save lives and property during flooding in the town. The disaster management teams will be supported by other government machinery with respect to providing them with the necessary equipment like boats, life jackets, ropes and other things like ambulances and other vehicles for transportation of patients etc. Saikheda and Chandori in Niphad taluka are prone to floods during the monsoon. On this backdrop, the Nashik rural police and the revenue department decided to conduct the mock drill so that the volunteers and the government machinery are aware of the standard operating procedures to control or minimize the damage during natural calamities. Police superintendent Sachin Patil said, “Regular practice of fighting disaster would make the actual work, if needed, much easier for the teams concerned and the government machinery.” Apart from the rescue operations, the administration also has to provide rations, food packets, drinking water, and medicine and set up health camps to ensure the needy persons get treatment in time.

Maharashtra: Cops conduct mock drill of disaster management team
Monsoon so far: heavy rainfall in parts of N-E, hardly any elsewhere
The Indian Express | 1 week ago
The Indian Express
1 week ago

The southwest monsoon has started inconsistently in different parts of the country, with rain eluding many states but lashing parts of other states. The all-India rainfall was 18% short of normal until Friday. But while a majority of India awaits rain, Assam and Meghalaya have been submerged in record rainfall of 1,000mm in the last 24 hours.Monsoon so farDespite the monsoon’s early arrival on May 29 over Kerala, rainfall has been abysmally poor over most regions where the onset has been declared. The rainfall deficiency for the season until June 17 is as high as 60% in Kerala and Maharashtra.Experts at the India Meteorological Department (IMD) said that the wind circulation pattern is yet to fully get established.This, along with absence of favourable systems, have kept the monsoon inactive so far. Senior Met officials noted that the monsoon onset has largely been driven by convective activities — thunder, lightning and localised rainfall, mainly realised during afternoon hours.On Friday, the Northern Limit of Monsoon (NLM) — or the imaginary line indicating the areas covered by the Southwest monsoon — passed through Porbandar, Bhavnagar, Khandwa, Gondia, Durg, Bhawanipura, Kalingapatnam, Malda and Motihari. On Friday, the monsoon advanced into a very small geographical area over north Bihar and sub-Himalayan West Bengal. The southwest monsoon has covered the entire Southern Peninsular and Northeast India, southern Chhattisgarh and Odisha, and some parts of Gujarat and Bihar.Region-wise, the rainfall departures were –24% in Southern Peninsular India and +39% in East and Northeast India. Over other regions, where the monsoon is yet to arrive, the departures were –63% in Northwest India and –57% in Central India.World’s wettest placesCherrapunji in Meghalaya, among the world’s wettest locations, has received unprecedented rainfall this week. In just three days between June 15 and 17, the total rainfall recorded was 2,456 mm — more than the annual rainfall of many places in central India and Mumbai’s seasonal (June to September) average rainfall. Friday (972 mm) was Cherrapunji’s third wettest June day since 1901, and Wednesday (811.6 mm) was the eighth wettest.Mawsynram in Meghalaya, the world’s wettest place, broke an 83-year record for June. The 24-hour rainfall on Friday at Mawsynram was 1003.6mm. The previous highest rainfall in June here was 954.4mm in June 1966.The IMD has attributed such extreme rainfall consistently over three days to the strong and moisture-loaded southerly winds blowing from the Bay of Bengal straight towards parts of Assam and Meghalaya. Since June 1, Meghalaya and Assam have recorded 194% and 96% surplus rainfall, respectively. Other northeastern states remain in deficit: Mizoram (–46%) , Manipur (–45%) and Tripura (–39%).Implications for agricultureMany southern states have started kharif sowing. At present, nursery sowing or transplantation of rice, finger millet, maize, soyabean, pigeon pea, groundnut are ongoing in Tamil Nadu, Kerala, coastal Karnataka, Andhra Pradesh, Telangana, Haryana and Punjab.The agricultural meteorology division of the IMD has advised farmers to take up nursery of rice and vegetables and prepare land ahead of sowing.ForecastAfter remaining subdued for nearly three weeks, both the Arabian Sea and the Bay of Bengal branches of the southwest monsoon will make further progress starting June 19. The IMD has forecast enhanced rainfall activity along the west coast, especially Konkan, Kerala and coastal Karnataka during June 19-22.“The monsoon winds from the Arabian Sea are set to strengthen, and there are chances of development of an off-shore trough parallel to the west coast, resulting in heavy rains along the west coast,” a senior IMD, Pune official said on Friday.An “intense and very heavy rainfall” warning and a “yellow” alert have been issued for southern Konkan during these days.The extremely heavy rainfall over the Northeast, especially Assam and Meghalaya, will continue until Monday. Thereafter, a reduction in rainfall is likely owing to the change in wind direction from southerly to westerlies from the Bay of Bengal.Due to likely instability caused by interaction between westerly winds from higher altitudes and most winds from the Arabian Sea, Northwest India, parts of Jammu & Kashmir will receive heavy rain during the next three days, the IMD said.With the monsoon still keeping with the normal onset dates and the current yet to be established, the upcoming spell starting June 19 still carries hope. According to officials, widespread and heavy rainfall can make up for the prevailing large deficits, and officials said conditions are favourable for further advance of the monsoon over Chhattisgarh, Odisha, Andhra Pradesh, West Bengal and Bihar by early next week.

Monsoon so far: heavy rainfall in parts of N-E, hardly any elsewhere
Prakash Ambedkar pushes for law to stop vilification of Prophet, heads of other religions
The Indian Express | 1 week ago
The Indian Express
1 week ago

Vanchit Bahujan Aghadi (VBA) president Prakash Ambedkar has given an ultimatum to the Maha Vikas Aghadi government in Maharashtra to bring a separate legislation in the monsoon session of the state legislature to stop vilification of Prophet Mohammed and heads of other religions.“We have urged the state government to bring Prophet Mohammed & Other Religious Heads Prohibition of Slander Act, 2021 to be introduced and passed in the monsoon session,” Ambedkar told The Indian Express.The state monsoon session will commence from July 18 and will be held in the Vidhan Bhawan in Mumbai.The draft of the proposed Act was mooted by VBA, along with various Muslim organisations like Raza Academy and Tahsfuz Namus-e-Risalat Board. The VBA and the Muslim organisations have been working to push the legislature to stop growing incidents of blasphemy and hatred being spread against Prophet Mohammed and heads of other religions through various forums by some sections in the state.Prakash Ambedkar, the great grandson of Dr B R Ambedkar, said, “Although we have certain sections like 153 (a) and Section 295 (a) under Indian Penal Code to deal with those causing enmity or hatred between different religious communities – it is still inadequate.”With changing times leading to greater polarisation, a separate firm legislation to specifically deal with vilification of religious heads has become a must, he said. “Somewhere, it should be reined with iron hands. Or else, how long can one derogatory remark made by an individual hold the system hostage? It leads to law and order problems. In the end, it is the innocent common man who suffers,” Ambedkar said, adding that he has held talks with state Home Minister Dilip Walse Patil on the need for such a law. The VBA leader said he has also reached out to leaders across the Maha Vikas Aghadi government.The VBA, which had initially planned a protest rally across the state against former BJP spokesperson Nupur Sharma’s derogatory remarks against Prophet Mohammed, postponed it after discussions with MVA. “We don’t want a law and order crisis in Maharashtra. We want the government to adopt legislation to stop this blasphemy against Prophet Mohammed and other religious heads,” Ambedkar said.He added that the VBA will stand by every Muslim and the party’s main goal was the upliftment and empowerment of other backward classes and Muslims. If the state government fails to implement the legislation, the VBA will be forced to take to the streets and agitate, he said.The proposed Prophet Mohammed & Other Religious Heads Prohibition of Slander Act, 2021 or Hate Speech (Prohibition Act) 2021 aims to prevent the spread of animosity, hatred and ill will between different castes and communities and calls for harsh punishment.The draft bill states: “Whoever by words, gesture, written matters, print, pictures, audio, video publicly or privately vilifies and maliciously insults or mocks the religious conviction of others, dishonors, uses derogatory remarks against Prophet Mohammad or other religious heads, desecrates objects of religious veneration, sacred books, scriptures, deity, or any religious groups, sects, places of worship, offends feelings of members of religious community, ceremonies or beliefs deliberately or maliciously to create animosity or hatred shall be punishable under the Act.”

Prakash Ambedkar pushes for law to stop vilification of Prophet, heads of other religions
Heatwave abates in all parts of country, unlikely to return till June 29: IMD
Times of India | 1 week ago
Times of India
1 week ago

NEW DELHI: Heatwave conditions have abated in all parts of the country, with the southwest monsoon progressing towards central and east India and a fresh Western Disturbance affecting the northwest region, the India Meteorological Department (IMD) said on Thursday. Northwest India was reeling under a heatwave spell since June 2 and central India since June 10 due to an onslaught of hot and dry westerly winds. A heatwave spell that started on June 3 prevailed over isolated pockets of Delhi, Jammu and Kashmir, Himachal Pradesh, Uttarakhand, north Rajasthan, Punjab, Haryana, southeast Uttar Pradesh, north Madhya Pradesh and Maharashtra's Vidarbha region till June 12. It then reduced in terms of area of impact and prevailed over isolated pockets of Delhi, south Haryana, southeast Uttar Pradesh and the western Himalayan region till June 15. Isolated pockets of Jharkhand, west Bihar, north Odisha and Chhattisgarh also experienced a heatwave spell from June 10 to June 15. "This heatwave has abated today (June 16). The progress of the southwest monsoon towards central and east India and the impact of the WD over northwest India have led to it," the IMD said, adding that the maximum temperatures dipped by five to 10 degrees Celsius in the northwestern and central parts of the country. "No significant heatwave conditions are likely over any part of the country till June 29," the IMD said. It said the southwest monsoon is likely to cover the remaining parts of central India and many parts of northwest India between June 23 and June 29. The Met office also said the country as a whole has received just 42.3 mm rainfall as against 62.1 mm, a rain deficit of 32 per cent, since June 1, when the monsoon season starts. Northwest India has gauged just 5.8 mm rainfall against the normal of 25.4 mm — a deficiency of 77 per cent — during this period, while east and northeast has recorded 155.4 mm rainfall, 14 per cent more than normal.

Heatwave abates in all parts of country, unlikely to return till June 29: IMD
Brace for intense rainfall in Maharashtra this weekend, says IMD
The Indian Express | 1 week ago
The Indian Express
1 week ago

Residents of most of parts of Maharashtra, including Pune, are in for some relief as the India Meteorological Department (IMD) has predicted intense rainfall over the weekend.“The ghat areas of Pune district could receive very heavy rainfall on June 21 and 22,” the IMD Pune officials said.The Southwest monsoon has covered all of Maharashtra six days after its onset over the State. On Wednesday, the Northern Limit of Monsoon passed through Porbandar, Bhavnagar, Khandwa, Gondia, Durg, Bhawanipatna, Kalingapatanam, Balurghar and Supaul after its latest second consecutive day of advance.Last year, the monsoon had covered the state within four days on June 10 after an early onset.However, this time, since the onset last week, rainfall over Maharashtra and Goa has largely remained subdued. Since June 1, Maharashtra recorded 32.5 mm against a normal of 76.2 mm of rains, which is a deficit of 57 per cent (till June 15). Most districts continue to remain dry and are presently either in the “deficient” or “large deficiency” category.This scenario is soon set to change with IMD forecasting enhancement in the rainfall over Konkan, Goa, Madhya Maharashtra, including Pune, regions from June 19 onwards. “The monsoon rainfall will pick up over the state from Sunday as strong westerly winds from the Arabian Sea are likely to bring moisture over this region. Besides, there is a likely development of an off-shore trough along the west coast, aiding an increase in rainfall activity,” Anupam Kashyapi, the head of weather forecasting division at IMD Pune, said.Marathwada and Vidarbha will come under the influence of the moisture laden winds from the Bay of Bengal and rainfall will pick up from Saturday. Here, the monsoon arrived on Thursday.As on Wednesday, the monsoon had covered more parts of Arabian Sea, Gujarat, entire Maharashtra, some parts of Madhya Pradesh, Telangana, some areas of Chhattisgarh, Andhra Pradesh and Odisha and west-central Bay of Bengal. So far, the monsoon progress has been normal.According to IMD’s latest weather forecast, the conditions are favourable for the further advancement of the monsoon into remaining Andhra Pradesh, Chhattisgarh and Odisha, Gangetic West Bengal, Jharkhand and sub-Himalayan West Bengal, more parts of Bihar and Uttar Pradesh by weekend.

Brace for intense rainfall in Maharashtra this weekend, says IMD
Area for pulses set to shrink in Maharashtra; cotton, soyabean to take their place
The Indian Express | 1 week ago
The Indian Express
1 week ago

In the coming kharif season, India’s pulses acreage is all set to shrink with cotton and soyabean taking its place. Higher returns from the latter is the main reason that India’s pulses acreage is set to witness a dramatic fall this year, feel trade sources.At the start of the kharif planting, seed industry has reported a 30-40 per cent dip in demand for seeds of pulses such as mung and even tur. Ajeet Mulay, member of the National Seed Association of India and member of the Green Gold group, Aurangabad-based seed manufacturing company, told The Indian Express that farmers in Maharashtra have shown interest in increasing their cotton and soyabean area instead. “We expect cotton area to increase while pulses area is all set to decrease,” he said. Normally, India reports around 135 lakh hectares of pulses area with Maharashtra reporting around 20 lakh hectares, a majority of which is tur. Rajasthan is a major mung growing area, while urad is grown in Madhya Pradesh, Uttar Pradesh, Rajasthan etc. Madhya Pradesh and Karantaka are also major growers of tur and other pulses.With the monsoon still to make its presence felt in major parts of the zones growing pulses, seed manufacturers are reporting greater shift towards cotton and soyabean from pulses. Mulay pointed out that cotton growers have managed to get over Rs 10,000/quintal and soyabean growers had commanded prices over Rs 7,000/quintals. “Both these commodities have commanded multiple times the government Minimum Support Price (MSP) so it is natural for farmers to shift to such crops,” he said. Also, in case of mung and urad, the sowing window closes by the end of June with farmers then shifting to other crops. With that window fast closing, most farmers would certainly shift to other crops.Pradeep Jain, founder president of the Khandesh Cotton Ginner and Traders Welfare Association, spoke about a 10-15 per cent increase in cotton area across the country. “Based on our interaction with seed dealers, we can see a clear shift towards cotton in many areas. With farmers commanding prices as high as Rs 14,000/quintal, it is no wonder they would gravitate towards the crop,” he said. The most shift, Jain and other cotton growers said, would happen at the expense of pulses.In case of soyabean, Indore-based Soyabean Processors Association (SOPA) also talked about a 5 per cent increase in area. D N Pathak, executive director of the association, pointed that the present mandi prices of soyabean are higher than the new MSP being declared. “At present, soyabean is trading at Rs 7,600/quintal which is 40 per cent higher than the new MSP of Rs 4,300/quintal. Of course, farmers would be drawn to this crop,” he said. The growth would come from all major soyabean growing states in the country. Pathak, however, added that it all will depend on the progress of monsoon.At present pulses are the only crops which are trading below their MSP. Rabi chana is trading at Rs 4,300/quintal much below its older MSP of Rs 5,100/quintal. Tur is trading near its MSP but farmers do not have much to sell Pulses farmers especially tur grower have already burnt their fingers in terms of both yield and prices. Last season tur yields were hit due to unseasonal rains during the harvest time which had seen yields dropping by 20 per cent. The higher than normal prices had seen the government take action to keep prices down . Free imports and imposition of stock limits had seen the prices correcting downwards.While tur prices had remained within the MSP, other pulses like chana have traded well below their MSP.Harsha Rai, vice president of Indore-based agro commodities firm Mayur Corporation, talked about a nation-wide 20 per cent dip in the area of pulses this season. In Karnataka, the pulses acreage, she said, would be taken by cotton, while in Maharashtra, pulses would be replaced by cotton and soyabean.

Area for pulses set to shrink in Maharashtra; cotton, soyabean to take their place
Nagpur: Brace for more cloud bursts, flash floods, hailstorms, and lightning this year in Vidarbha
Times of India | 1 week ago
Times of India
1 week ago

NAGPUR: Vidarbha will see more cloud bursts, flash floods, hailstorms, and lightning this year, and the maximum temperatures will near the 50-degree mark in the next few years, believes renowned cloudburst and flash flood expert and meteorological scientist professor Kirankumar Johare. The scientist, who runs a dedicated and free weather prediction forum ‘Andaz Nhave Mahiti’ (Not prediction but information) for farmers, spent a few days in Vidarbha and visited many places. He spoke to TOI and shared his observations about Vidarbha’s weather. “I visited interiors of Washim, Amravati, Nagpur, Chandrapur, and Bhandara districts during my tour. Farmers in Vidarbha are not getting proper information about the weather changes, and mainly about rainfall. They have trust issues with the government weather prediction system,” said Johare. Vidarbha had witnessed several cloud bursts last year too. “Vidarbha and Marathwada are becoming cloud burst and lightning prone regions. In the next few days, you can see flash floods, thunder storms more often in Vidarbha. Temperature has already reached near 47-degree mark, which is major concern for the region,” he said. Johare clarified that the monsoon will reach Vidarbha only after August 15 this year. “Everywhere in Vidarbha, I observed formations of cumulonimbus clouds. These clouds are responsible for cloud bursts, lightning and thunderstorms. Monsoon clouds are nimbostratus clouds. They are dark, grey, featureless layers of cloud, thick enough to block out the Sun. They are yet to arrive in this region,” he said. Due to flash floods, the quota of 80 to 100mm rains can be completed within a day, he said. “The local administration is asking farmers to wait for at least 80mm rains before they start sowing. Remember, one flash flood can bring more than 100mm rains. But such rain is not useful for sowing. My advice will be to sow only after the monsoon reaches, which means after August 15,” Johare said.

Nagpur: Brace for more cloud bursts, flash floods, hailstorms, and lightning this year in Vidarbha
Monsoon keeps Madhya Pradesh waiting in clammy suspense
Times of India | 1 week ago
Times of India
1 week ago

BHOPAL: Despite hitting the Kerala coast early, onset of monsoon in Madhya Pradesh is late this year compared to the last two years. In 2020 and 2021, monsoon has hit the state by this time. Monsoon arrived in Kerala on May 29, three days ahead of its scheduled onset date June 1, but the wait continues for the state. The southwest monsoon has hit bordering states Maharashtra and Gujarat. Meteorological department, Bhopal circle senior scientist Ved Prakash Singh said, reason for the delay in monsoon is that there was no progress in monsoon for over a week till June 6 after it hit the Kerala coast on May 29. It was due to weak monsoon current. Monsoon is delayed from last year, but will be roughly around time and rainfall will also be normal. Officials said, the monsoon in MP would be normal this year. A few divisions may get more than average or normal rainfall this year. Officials said, monsoon may be above normal in Indore, Naramadapuram and Jabalpur divisions, normal in Ujjain, Bhopal, Sagar, Shahdol divisions and slightly more than normal in Gwalior and adjoining divisions. The normal monsoon period in the state is from June 1 to September 30. Onset of monsoon in MP is between June 13 and June 16 while the official onset date of monsoon in Bhopal is 17 June. It is expected to hit the state any day. On an average 990 mm rainfall is considered normal for the state and 1,090 mm rain is considered as normal rainfall for Bhopal. The state was fortunate to receive its yearly rainfall quota last year. Relief in the form of pre-monsoon activities has started in the state and will continue till the monsoon clouds finally cover the state.

Monsoon keeps Madhya Pradesh waiting in clammy suspense
Monsoon reaches Nashik, Jalgaon, Dhule, Nandurbar
Times of India | 1 week ago
Times of India
1 week ago

NASHIK: The southwest monsoon has reached four districts of north Maharashtra — Nashik, Jalgaon, Dhule and Nandurbar — declared the India Meteorological Department (IMD) and added that over the next 3-4 days, the region would receive light to medium rainfall. As per the IMD officials’ forecast, the region would get good rainfall which would help the farmers. On Monday night, parts of rural Nashik including Malegaon, Kalwan, Sinnar Chandwad, Baglan and Niphad received rainfall. IMD Pune’s K S Hosalikar said the monsoon has reached the four districts of north Maharashtra, and parts of these four districts have already received rain in the past two-three days. These districts will receive light to medium showers over the next four days, beginning Wednesday. The showers are erratic and only some parts of Nashik district have received rain. Other places have not received adequate rain yet, said Vivek Sonawane, the district agriculture superintendent officer. “Farmers should not start sowing until they get 80-100% rainfall in their areas,” he added. In June, the Nashik district normally gets 81.4mm of rain. In the past few days, the district has received 50mm rainfall, which is just over 61% of normal rainfall. Malegaon and Chandwad talukas have received 88.2mm and 81.2mm rainfall, respectively, while Nandgaon and Surgana talukas have received 80.6mm and 67.8mm rainfall, respectively. Other talukas too have received some rainfall — Kalwan (59.4mm), Sinnar (58mm), Baglan (54.5mm) and Peth 41.1 (mm). However, Trimbakeshwar, Igatpuri and Yeola have received marginal rain. In Jalgaon district, few talukas got marginal showers too. Amalner and Chopda talukas got 22mm and 16mm rainfall. In Nandurbar, Akkalkuwa and Nandurbar talukas got 56mm and 42mm rainfall, while Shadada and Taloda received 37mm and 10mm rainfall, respectively.

Monsoon reaches Nashik, Jalgaon, Dhule, Nandurbar
Half of Kolhapur district has received less than 25% rainfall
Times of India | 1 week ago
Times of India
1 week ago

KOLHAPUR: Around 50% of the Kolhapur district has received less than 25% of the actual rainfall in the first two weeks of June. With monsoon yet to tighten its grip in the region, the district, which reports excess rainfall every year, is witnessing rainfall deficiency for the first time in recent years. Places in the rest of the district are also rain deficient as they have received rainfall between 25% and 50% in comparison to the actual rainfall. The severely rain deficient tehsils are from the ghat sections aligning with the Konkan region of Maharashtra. Same is the case for Satara district where the two hilly tehsils of Patan and Mahabaleshwar have so far received less than 25% showers. The tehsils in Kolhapur district that have received less than 25% rainfall are Panhala, Gaganbawda, Radhanagari, Bhudargad, Ajara and Chandgad. According to the data obtained, Panhala teshil has received 26 mm rainfall since June 1. During the same period last year, it had received 134 mm rainfall. Similarly, Gaganbawda, the tehsil which receives record rainfall every monsoon, has so far received only 33 mm rainfall. Last year, during the same period the figure stood at 463 mm. Radhanagari has received 11 mm rainfall in comparison to 288 mm showers last year, while Bhudargad has received 27 mm rains in comparison to last year’s 148 mm. Last year, Ajara had received 169 mm rainfall, but now it has got only 2.5 mm rain. For Chandgad, this year’s figure is at 37 mm as compared to previous year’s 246 mm. Weather expert Shantanu Patil said, “The sea surface is not heating up and other factors are also not coming to force to bring an adequate situation for the downpour. As per IMD, the monsoon will tighten its grip after June 17, till then a dry spell in on the cards.”

Half of Kolhapur district has received less than 25% rainfall
Two days of zero rainfall activity drives mercury up in city
The Indian Express | 1 week ago
The Indian Express
1 week ago

After heavy rainfall on Friday and Saturday, no rainfall has been recorded in the city since Sunday. The onset of the Southwest monsoon over Mumbai was declared on June 11. The India Meteorological Department (IMD) has not issued any warning for the city for this week and has forecast only cloudy skies with light to moderate rainfall. According to the seven-day forecast by IMD, rainfall activity is likely to pick up over the weekend.In the 24 hours ending 8.30 am on Monday, the IMD Colaba observatory recorded 2.3 mm of rain while the Santacruz observatory recorded no rain. The total rainfall recorded this season by the IMD Colaba and Santacruz observatory has been 102.5mm and 79.8 respectively.With not much rain activity, the day and night temperatures rose in the city after a brief drop. On Monday, the minimum temperatures recorded by the IMD Colaba and Santacruz observatory were 24.2 degrees and 26.6 degrees. The day temperatures or the maximum temperature rose from 31 degrees to 35 degrees.Meanwhile, the Southwest Monsoon has covered the entire Konkan region on Monday. “The monsoon advanced to some more parts of the Arabian Sea, some parts of Gujarat state, the entire Konkan, most parts of Madhya Maharashtra, most parts of Marathwada and Karnataka, Some parts of Telangana and Rayalaseema, some more parts of Tamil Nadu, most parts of Sub-Himalayan West Bengal, some parts of Bihar,” stated IMD.

Two days of zero rainfall activity drives mercury up in city
Umbrella Waterfalls: The Dreamy Fall in Bhandardara is Ideal For Refreshing Vacay in Maharashtra
India | 1 week ago
India
1 week ago

Umbrella Waterfalls in Maharashtra: Umbrella Falls is a stunning seasonal waterfall located at Bhandardara Dam in Maharashtra’s Ahmednagar district. During the rainy season, the Falls are best seen from 500 feet between the lovely and green Sahyadri hills, especially from the footbridge that links the waterfall and the dam. The milky white Umbrella Waterfalls, flanked by tall green trees, are so beautiful that you’ll feel instantly transported to a fairytale. This water body is employed as a hydroelectric power generator to generate electricity in addition to being a sight to behold.Also Read - Out For A Walk With Sister, 5-Year-Old Boy Mauled To Death By Stray Dogs In MaharashtraOne of the top tourist attractions of Bhandardara, Umbrella Waterfall is a seasonal and one of the most beautiful waterfalls in Maharashtra. This place is ideal for someone looking for a relaxing and refreshing vacation.Credit – fairytale_of_kiranash#MaharashtraUnlimited pic.twitter.com/3d1FSNr5HH— Maharashtra Tourism (@maha_tourism) June 10, 2022 Also Read - Maharashtra Schools To Resume After Summer Vacations From June 15 Amid Rising COVID CasesThe area beneath the Wilson Dam is known as an umbrella because the force of water falling on the naturally positioned rocks creates an umbrella-like effect. To get to the core waterfalls, you’ll need to take a short hike. The footbridge that connects the falls to the dam in an hour-long trek also provides a wonderful vista. Also Read - One Dead, Several Injured After Part Of Building Collapses In Navi MumbaiUmbrella Waterfall is one of the finest waterfalls in Maharashtra (Picture Credit: Anassaeed/Twitter)The dam was encircled by thick vegetation. When you’re seeking a quiet spot to have a picnic with your family or pals.The lake is one of the village’s most popular tourist attractions, with visitors coming to enjoy boating or wandering in the evenings.Randha Falls is also the Pravara River’s waterfall, which cascades from a height of 170 feet and is popular for nature walks and camping.From the settlement, one can see the majestic peak. From the village, you can embark on an arduous trek to this summit.If you want to make your treasure quest more thrilling, you might arrange to visit this ashram. It is a famous ashram also referenced in the beautiful epic Ramayana.Umbrella Waterfall during Monsoon (Picture Credit: Anassaeed/Twitter)Distance From Pune: 4 hours 32 minutes (164.4 km)Distance From Mumbai: 4 hours (161.2 km)Bhandardara is a monsoon paradise that lasts from June to September. During the rainy season, the treasure’s natural beauty was enhanced. Temperatures should preferably be between 20 and 30 degrees Celsius. It is preferable to visit this location early in the morning or late in the evening, when the sunlight streams through the nearby woodlands, revitalizing your spirit. Waterfalls can also be used as a base for bird observation and other hiking activities.Add this beautiful waterfall to your bucket list for a quick monsoon getaway!

Umbrella Waterfalls: The Dreamy Fall in Bhandardara is Ideal For Refreshing Vacay in Maharashtra