Maharashtra School News

In Maharashtra draft policy includes role of parents to elevate learning
Times of India | 23 hours ago | |
Times of India
23 hours ago | |

PUNE: Involvement of parents in teaching their wards, providing uniforms and study material on time and to every student and mock tests were among suggestions from experts and educators in the draft policy to improve academic excellence in government schools prepared jointly by Samagra Shiksha Abhiyaan project and the Maharashtra State Council of Education Research and Training. The draft has been submitted to the state government for approval and once it gets a nod the policy will be implemented from next year onwards.Project director of SSA Kailas Pagare and other education department officials conducted a meeting recently to take suggestions and discuss ways to improve the quality of education in schools. Pagare said, "We took the opinions of ideal teachers, education experts, SCERT officials, and researchers among others."The campaign 'Nipun Maharashtra' is being implemented in the state for the past few months in order to improve the quality of school education."Against the same background, the quality of school education in the state should be enhanced more rapidly in the next academic year," added Pagare.Zilla parishad teacher Somnath Valke said, "We need to understand how to become self-sufficient in an effort to improve the quality in classrooms. One of my suggestions was that it was necessary to add classes from V to VIII to zilla parishad schools. This will help in increasing participation in scholarships and other examinations."Ashwini Sonawane, block development officer of Bhor taluka, said that the experiment of 'Mothers' Club' they had conducted in government schools has been effective. Parental involvement and environment are very important for the development of schools. "Innovation and experimentation lead to an increase in the quality of students," Sonawane added.

In Maharashtra draft policy includes role of parents to elevate learning
Two held, six boys detained in clash of two groups in Pune
Times of India | 23 hours ago | |
Times of India
23 hours ago | |

PUNE: The Yerawada police have arrested two men and detained six boys aged between 15 and 16 on the charge of rioting, following a clash between two groups of minors at Laxminagar in Yerawada around 11pm on Friday, which left three people injured and an autorickshaw damaged.The two groups of minor boys are affiliated with two local gangs of criminals, the police said, after receiving two cross-complaints of riots and assault against the members of both the groups.The police identified the injured as Abdulla Amirulla Khan (19), Sharad Pramod Ingle (27) and 17-year-old boy of Laxminagar in Yerawada. "Ingle, and his accomplice, Vivek Prakash Gawali (20), were later arrested in one of the cases," the police said. The videos of the clash between the two groups went viral on social media sites. Confirming the development, deputy commissioner of police (Zone IV) Shrikant Borate told TOI, "A majority of the detained boys are school dropouts. We had invoked provisions of the Maharashtra Control of Organised Crime Act (MCOCA) against the senior members of the two gangs in 2021. They are lodged in the Yerawada jail."According to the police, Khan and his group members had picked up arguments with the other group led by Ingle during a football match about six months ago. "The minor boys and Ingle carried a grudge against Khan and his friends since then. On Friday night, the boys assaulted Khan with choppers and wooden sticks after finding him alone. The boys also vandalized the autorickshaws parked on the road, besides throwing emplty beer bottles on the road," the police said.The police summoned the parents of minor boys, followed by a counselling session.

Two held, six boys detained in clash of two groups in Pune
Maharashtra Minister Compared To Jyotiba Phule, Months After Ink Attack
Ndtv | 1 day ago | |
Ndtv
1 day ago | |

The minister's comment had stirred up a controversy, resulting in an ink attack on him. (File)Pune: Bharatiya Janata Party leader Chitra Wagh has compared Maharashtra cabinet minister and her senior party colleague Chandrakant Patil with social reformer Mahatma Jyotiba Phule.Wagh, who heads the state BJP women's wing, made the comments on Sunday at a programme organised here by local party leader Hemant Rasne which was also attended by Patil."We can see Savitribai (wife of Phule and pioneer of women's education in Maharashtra in the 19th century) in households, but a search is on for a Jyotiba (Phule) like Chandrakant Patil and BJP leader Hemant Rasne," she said.Notably, state Higher and Technical Education Minister Patil, who is an MLA from Pune, had kicked up a row by commenting that B R Ambedkar and Jyotiba Phule did not seek government grants for running educational institutions, but they “begged” people to gather funds for starting schools and colleges.The use of the word “begged” had stirred up a controversy, resulting in an ink attack on Patil.Meanwhile, Wagh, who had filed a complaint against social media influencer Uorfi Javed for dressing "improperly" in public, said the latter should be praised as she has started wearing full clothes.PromotedListen to the latest songs, only on JioSaavn.com"I never had any problem with that woman or with any religion. I had a problem with abnormality but now I think we should praise her because she is seen in full clothes now. I have received multiple photographs of her and I can see she's wearing good clothes," Wagh said responding to a query from reporters.(Except for the headline, this story has not been edited by NDTV staff and is published from a syndicated feed.)Featured Video Of The DayShah Rukh Khan's Signature Pose And A Pathaan-Special Dance

Maharashtra Minister Compared To Jyotiba Phule, Months After Ink Attack
Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation is concretising tree roots again: Residents
Times of India | 2 days ago | |
Times of India
2 days ago | |

MUMBAI: A group of residents from Dadar Parsi Colony (DPC) have taken objection to the manner in which the BMC is revamping the footpaths in their locality which they alleged was at the cost of concretising the tree roots, the civic body seems to be at it again.Over the weekend residents claimed that the footpath improvement work is being carried out in an 'insensitive' manner around the trees of Five Gardens, in the name of beautification.It may be recollected that in December 2021 the BMC had begun work on the footpath improvement in Dadar East--the stretch between Ruia College to St. Joseph's High School Wadala which has been dug up.Burgis Bulsara, a local resident who noticed it said, "Several tree roots of large trees which are over 50-70 years old have been cut. Ours is a heritage area and the contractors on the job were very clearly informed several times in the past that they do not have to dig deep near the tree roots and neither should they be cutting the roots and pouring concrete on the roots. However, we find that there is absolutely zero level of supervising going on at the site and the work has been left to the labourers." Bulsara added that unless the contractors are heavily penalised this trend would not stop.Last year, when the same issue had surfaced a few of the colony residents reached out to the Mumbai Heritage Conservation Committee (MHCC) as well, considering that their area is a heritage precinct. TOI had reported about the same in January 2022. The MHCC did halt the work briefly as they opined that the damage to the roots could weaken the trees. However, the work began when the civic body promised to proceed without damaging the tree roots.Katie Bagli, a local resident said that she has already raised the issue with the garden department. "The roots have been terribly damaged in the name of relaying the footpath. The trees and greenery are the real heritage which we do not want to lose," she said. When contacted an official from the civic gardens department said that they received a complaint on Sunday morning, and a site visit would be done today following which they would be able to comment on the matter.

Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation is concretising tree roots again: Residents
Schools’ assn alleges extortion bid by education officers in Maharashtra
Times of India | 3 days ago | |
Times of India
3 days ago | |

NAGPUR: The Unaided Schools’ Forum (USF), which represents almost all CBSE schools in Maharashtra, has alleged that education officials are trying to extort money in the guise of ‘NOC renewal’.An email sent to chief minister Eknath Shinde among others by USF said the 3-year NOC renewal GR has already been stayed by the Bombay High Court in 2021, but the state education officials continue to ‘harass’ schools. In the email, USF’s honorary secretary Subhash Chandra Kedia, wrote, “We are really shocked to bring to your kind notice that officers of the education department are harassing our unaided private schools and trying to extort money on the pretext of renewal of the NOC.”Speaking to TOI, Kedia said that the state government had issued a GR in August 2009 in which it mentioned that schools have to take NOC from the education department every three years. Kedia said, “This GR was challenged by us in writ petition No. 2157 of 2010 before the Bombay High Court. The court stayed the GR in its order dated November 14, 2011.”He said that things changed in 2020. Kedia said, “The education department has again issued illegal GRs dated March 4, 2020 and July 20, 2020 regarding renewal of the NOC every three years by disobeying the order of the court aforesaid.” He added that both these GRs have also been challenged before the court.USF said that this ‘discrepancy’ had been pointed out to the state government in official correspondence in March 2021. Kedia said, “Still education officers throughout Maharashtra are threatening our schools that if NOC is not renewed, then such schools shall be derecognized. They are also indulging in extortion of money under the pretext of renewal of the NOC.” Kedia said, “We really fail to understand why the education department is openly defying the court’s order of 2011.” USF has warned that if education officials insist on renewal of the NOC, then they will proceed with legal action. “These officials are in contempt of court. So we will definitely file a case against them for harassing our schools,” said Kedia.

Schools’ assn alleges extortion bid by education officers in Maharashtra
Now, FIR against schools forging student database
Times of India | 3 days ago | |
Times of India
3 days ago | |

Mumbai: More than a decade after schools were found to have inflated number of students admitted to get government aid, the state on Friday framed guidelines, including filing criminal cases against educational institutions forging student database. Schools must submit their students' attendance register to the education department at the end of each month.A census of students' enrolment in 2011 found duplication of names of over 24 lakh students in schools receiving government aid. Maximum cases were from Beed district.A public interest litigation (PIL) was filed in the Aurangabad bench of Bombay high court in 2012, seeking action against schools forging student database. The PIL prompted the government to make Aadhar card registration of students compulsory from July 2015. The court, last April, appointed a three-member panel headed by retired justice P V Hardas to suggest ways to prevent duplication of student databases.Based on the panel's recommendation, the state has now issued guidelines for schools, especially those receiving government grants, while admitting students.Education officers have been directed to file police cases against schools found to have inflated student numbers. Schools will be given a month to respond to allegations of bogus students. Schools have been found to inflate student numbers to get extra divisions and receive aid for teachers. Schools receive full and partial government aid. While the education department has started taking steps to recover the amount from schools found guilty of malpractice, no police case has been filed so far.Education officers now have to inspect students' attendance registers twice a year. Though state government officers, empowered to grant sanction for aid, were found to be in connivance with schools, no action was taken against them either. In case of unaided, self-financing schools, education officers have to check data uploaded on the government's portal.Two copies of the admission form have to be maintained, with one submitted to the education department. Admission form should have the signature and photos of parents and their Aadhar card copies. Each admission form should carry the photo and Aadhar card details of the student. The matter first came to light when funds running into crores meant for scholarships of SC, ST and OBC students were found to have been siphoned off between 2008-09.

Now, FIR against schools forging student database
In 2024 Lok Sabha polls, PM Modi will break all records and NDA will retain power: Maha CM Shinde
The Economic Times | 4 days ago | |
The Economic Times
4 days ago | |

Maharashtra Chief Minister Eknath Shinde on Friday said that in the 2024 Lok Sabha elections, Prime Minister Narendra Modi will break all records and the National Democratic Alliance (NDA) will retain power with a thumping majority. He was talking to reporters after attending the live screening of 'Pariksha Pe Charcha' event addressed by PM Modi. Shinde saw the programme at the municipal school in Kisan Nagar locality of the city, where he had studied.Stating that he was pleased to witness the 'Pariksha Pe Charcha' programme in Thane, where he grew up, Shinde added that he was proud of being a civic school student. Replying to a question on the results of a recent political survey conducted by a media house on the next year's Lok Sabha polls, he said, "In the next general elections, PM Modi will break all records and the NDA will return to power with a thumping majority." Shinde said a survey conducted on just a handful of people does not give a true picture. "They ignored the results of the recently-concluded gram panchayat elections, where the Balasahebanchi Shiv Sena (Shinde-led faction) and the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) performed very well," he said. "In politics, two plus two is not always four. A survey based on just a handful of people does not give the real picture...I have got the details of how many people were surveyed. I do not want to go into any figures," he said. In the two-and-a-half years before he became the chief minister, a "government with negativity" was in power, Shinde said while referring to the Maha Vikas Aghadi (MVA) government led by Uddhav Thackeray. But there is a government with positivity in the state now. There was dissatisfaction in the state during the previous government's rule. But we launched several development works and changed the entire atmosphere in the state, he said. "Now, even I will not be able to say as to who will join hands with whom and whose alliance will break apart. But the Balasahebanchi Shiv Sena and BJP have been doing good work and this is a government of the common man. People have already decided whom they will vote for and we understand people's response," he said. "The survey said that the NDA government will come to power and that the popularity of PM Modi is increasing. Is it any different in Maharashtra?...We will be leading whenever elections are held. People of the state have already made up their mind. Hence, those who want to enjoy the opinion poll results for the next one-and-a-half years, let them enjoy," he said. "We are not afraid of elections. Future itself will give replies to the predictions of the survey," he said. During his visit to Thane city on Thursday, Shiv Sena (UBT) president and former chief minister Uddhav Thackeray had alleged that the Sena and Maharashtra were defamed due to the "betrayal and defections" that took place, a reference to Shinde and 39 MLAs bringing down the MVA government.Replying to Thackeray's remarks, Shinde said, "We give replies through our work. If you make two allegations, we will carry out four works. It will be our reply. People are not interested in allegations and counter-allegations." "When 50 MLAs, 13 MPs and several office-bearers of the party across the country and even close relatives deserted them, then they should have done soul searching and introspected. Instead of that, they are indulging in allegations. I wish them all the best," he said. Students from 968 schools, including 140 civic ones, in Thane witnessed the 'Pariksha pe Charcha' programme at their schools, BJP MLC and party's Thane city district president Niranjan Davkhare said in a release.

In 2024 Lok Sabha polls, PM Modi will break all records and NDA will retain power: Maha CM Shinde
Maharashtra HSC 2023 Admit Card releasing today at mahahsscboard.in, how to download
Times of India | 4 days ago | |
Times of India
4 days ago | |

NEW DELHI: The Maharashtra State Board of Secondary and Higher Secondary Education (MSBSHSE) will release the Maharashtra Board HSC admit card 2023 today, on January 27, 2023. Students who are going to appear for the Higher Secondary Certificate examinations this year will be able to download the hall ticket through the official website - mahahsscboard.in.The Maharashtra HSC exam is scheduled to commence from February 21 and conclude on March 20, 2023. Maharashtra Board Class 12 exams will be conducted in two shifts - Morning shift from 11 AM to 2 PM whereas evening shift will be conducted from 3 PM to 6 PM.Check official circular for admit card releaseThe detailed Maharashtra HSC date sheet 2023 is available on the official website or check here.Read AlsoMaharashtra Board HSC, SSC 2023 date sheet released on mahahsscboard.in, check timetable hereThe Maharashtra State Board of Secondary and Higher Secondary Education (MSBSHSE) has released the date sheet for Maharashtra HSC and SSC board exams. Students can check the schedule for classes 10, 12 on the official website at mahahsscboard.in. As per the schedule, the Maharashtra Board exam forIt shall be noted that school authorities will have to download the admit cards for students and teachers are required to sign all of them and then only give it to the students. Then candidates will have to collect it from their respective schools.In order to download the Maharashtra HSC 2023 admit card online, schools will have to login using Username and Password.Direct link for Institute login windowHow to download Maharashtra HSC Hall Ticket 2023?Step 1: Visit the official website at mahahsscboard.inStep 2: On the homepage, click on the Institute login link for HSC.Step 3: Enter the login details such as User Name and Password.Step 4: Download the Maharashtra Class 12 admit card and sign.It is mandatory for all students to keep a hard copy of the Maharashtra HSC admit card and produce it when asked at the examination centre on the day of exam. For more details, students should keep a check on the official website.

Maharashtra HSC 2023 Admit Card releasing today at mahahsscboard.in, how to download
14-year-old girl dies by suicide claiming harassment by teacher in Maharashtra’s Latur
Times of India | 1 week ago | |
Times of India
1 week ago | |

LATUR: A 14-year-old girl allegedly died by suicide at her house in Ausa Road in Latur district alleging harassment by her teacher. Police said that Shrawani Sanjay Naiknavare, a Class 9 student at a private school, allegedly hanged herself at her house. In a suicide note recovered from the scene, the girl had claimed that a male teacher in the school had mentally harassed her by taunting her in the class, theu said. Based on a complaint lodged by the girl's mother, the police have registered a case under relevant sections of the Indian Penal Code, the official said, adding that no arrest has been made in this regard.(With inputs from PTI)

14-year-old girl dies by suicide claiming harassment by teacher in Maharashtra’s Latur
  • Teen Dies By Suicide; Alleged Harassment By Teacher: Maharashtra Cops
  • Ndtv

    The police have registered a case under relevant sections of the Indian Penal Code. (Representational)Latur: A 14-year-old girl allegedly committed suicide citing mental harassment by her teacher in Maharashtra's Latur district, police said on Friday.The Class 9 student at a private school, allegedly died by suicide at her house in Ausa Road on Wednesday evening, an official said.In a suicide note recovered from the scene, the victim claimed that a male teacher in the school had mentally harassed her by taunting her in class, he said.PromotedListen to the latest songs, only on JioSaavn.comBased on a complaint lodged by the girl's mother, the police have registered a case under relevant sections of the Indian Penal Code, the official said, adding that no arrest has been made in this regard.(Except for the headline, this story has not been edited by NDTV staff and is published from a syndicated feed.)Featured Video Of The DayTourists Make A Beeline For Gulmarg After Fresh Snowfall

‘Refer to Constitution’: Saxena replies to Kejriwal’s ‘Who is L-G?’ question
The Indian Express | 1 week ago | |
The Indian Express
1 week ago | |

Two days after Delhi Chief Minister Arvind Kejriwal came down heavily on alleged interference in the affairs of the elected AAP government during his address in the Delhi Legislative Assembly, asking “Who is the LG, where did he come from?”, Lieutenant Governor Vinai Kumar Saxena wrote to him, asking him to refer to the Constitution for the answer.In his letter, L-G Saxena termed Kejriwal’s statements against him both in the Delhi Assembly and outside it as “substantively misleading, untrue and derogatory”.Questioning his alleged interference in matters of the Delhi government over a range of issues, Kejriwal had accused Saxena of constitutional overreach during his address to the House before leading a march to Raj Niwas and demanding that the L-G meet him and the 61 other AAP MLAs.Referring to media reports related to his allegations against him, Saxena said some of these did not deserve a reply since they “cater to a very low level of discourse.” He also termed as “posturing” Kejriwal’s allegation that the L-G did not meet him after his march to Raj Niwas.“I came to know through media reports that on Monday…you left the Assembly and were protesting with others outside Raj Niwas, demanding to meet me. Thereafter, I invited you and the Dy. Chief Minister to come and see me. I would have, indeed, loved to have you over and served you lunch as well” Saxena stated.“However, you chose not to come on the pretext of wanting to meet me with all of your MLAs. You would appreciate that, given the short notice and sudden demand on your part, it would not have been possible to at once have a meeting with 70-80 people, nor would have it served any concrete purpose,” he added.Terming it unfortunate, Saxena accused Kejriwal of political posturing by announcing that he had refused to meet him. “I must mention here that I was rather astounded at the fact that even as the city is grappling with several serious developmental issues, you found time to walk for long and stage a protest meant solely for posturing, rather than taking the issue to a logical conclusion by meeting me,” Saxena stated.The L-G said he was glad that the issue of education and teacher training was being raised by the CM and AAP MLAs, following which he took on the AAP government over it. The L-G flagged that average attendance in government schools, which was 70.73% in 2012-2013 “consistently fell year on year” reaching 60.65% in 2019-2020, despite concerted efforts after their closure due to the Covid pandemic between March 2020 and June 2022, the numbers “went up to only 73.74%.““Enrolment in government schools that stood at 16.1 lakh during 2013-2014, consistently came down to 15.1 lakh in 2019-2020. This, despite the fact that population of the city grew and enrolment should have increased proportionately,” L-G Saxena said.He also brought up the issue of no new schools having been built during the last eight years in Delhi despite the Delhi Development Authority allotting 13 plots to the education department since 2015.“In this regard, right after taking over, I personally ensured that six plots were allotted in August 2022 for building schools by GNCTD (Government of NCT of Delhi). Adding classrooms in existing schools and counting toilets as classrooms, do not, by any stretch of imagination, amount to opening new schools, as you would appreciate,” he added.Despite the AAP government’s “claims of unprecedented improvement in government education system in Delhi”, Saxena stated that the National Achievement Survey (NAS) 2021 pegged the performance of about 30% students in Delhi government schools till Class VIII below basic levels and for about 44% students “barely basic”.“Similarly, performance of about 33% students studying in Class X is below basic and for about 30%, it is barely basic. There is rampant math and science phobia among students of Delhi government schools and this results in the fact that only 21,340 out of 2,31,448 students studying in Class XII are in the Science stream,” he stated.The L-G also questioned the AAP government’s claims related to higher enrolment in government schools. “Contrary to claims, the number of students going to private schools has increased in Delhi. While the share of private schools in 2013-2014 was 35%, the same went up to 43% in 2019-2020, and despite migration from private schools to government schools due to the pandemic distress, this number yet hovers around 40%,” Saxena said.He also questioned the need to send teachers for training to Finland. “Irrespective of whether a 5-day trip to Finland will serve any purpose of substantive training to the visitors or would serve as an event to be played up in the media, I did not reject the proposal thereof,” he sought to clarify.“I raised a few queries with respect to the impact assessment and cost benefit analysis of such visits which have been going on for past few years, and asked the department, whether such training could be obtained in a more cost-effective manner in our own Institutions of Excellence, like the IIMs,” L-G Saxena added.Saxena pointed out that recently, he had cleared proposals of sending 55 principals and vice-principals of government schools to Cambridge in 2 batches for 10 days each, with specific training goals.“While being on the subject, I would also like to bring to your attention the plight of 12 colleges of Delhi University that are funded by GNCTD. Their representatives met me and submitted a memorandum detailing their grievances in terms of deliberate stopping of already sanctioned funds, non-payment of salaries and non-sanction of posts,” Saxena said.There was much more in terms of scholarships to minorities and marginalised sections that he wanted to discuss with CM Kejriwal, the L-G stated.“I reiterate, that I write to you, not only as the Lt. Governor of Delhi, but also as a concerned resident of the city. You are indeed a driven person, and I am sure that you will take cognizance of the facts stated above and take remedial measures to engage meaningfully and constructively to rectify the grave shortcomings, for better outcomes,” Saxena added.

‘Refer to Constitution’: Saxena replies to Kejriwal’s ‘Who is L-G?’ question
NLSIU releases provisional admission list amid allegations of injustice; 60 Karnataka students across categories
The Indian Express | 1 week ago | |
The Indian Express
1 week ago | |

Amid calls for protest against the alleged injustice meted out to students from Karnataka at the National Law School of India University (NLSIU) in Bengaluru, the varsity on Wednesday released the provisional list of candidates for admission in its undergraduate programme in the wake of the Common Law Admission Test or CLAT 2023.The provisional list shows that out of the total 240 seats, as many as 60 (25%) have been offered to Karnataka students. According to the NLSIU Inclusion and Expansion Plan 2021-2025, the university voluntarily adopted a 25% horizontal compartmentalised reservation for Karnataka students from the 2021-22 academic year. As a result, NLSIU ensures that students from the state are admitted to 25% of seats in every vertical category, including general/SC/ST/OBC/EWS and, as a result, constitute at least 25% of the overall student body. In this case, Karnataka students are those who have studied in any recognised institution in the state for not less than 10 years.Earlier, Karnataka Law Minister J C Madhuswamy wrote to the vice-chancellor of NLSIU complaining that the “university has compartmentalised the reservation and provided a quantity of 25% including those who have been selected under the All India Rank”. He highlighted that “NLSIU is grouping even meritorious students who are supposed to be under general category along with domicile reserved students”.However, as per the provisional list, 19 students of Karnataka domicile have been selected for the undergraduate programme under the general category. This includes students with ranks 12, 23, 27 and 32.In fact, on Saturday, a group of pro-Kannada activists and lawyers’ association is set to stage a protest at NLSIU opposing the alleged “exclusion of Karnataka students” under their reservation policy. Karnataka Higher Education Minister C N Ashwath Narayan had also written to the university alleging that the institution was not complying with domicile reservation under section 4 of the NLSIU Amendment Act.In 2020, Karnataka High Court, in its decision dated September 29, 2020, struck down the validity of the National Law School (Amendment) Act, 2020 passed by the state government in April 2020. The court had stated that the state legislature has no power or authority under the Act to direct the respondent/Law School to provide reservations for students in view of the limited role of the state under the Act. Currently, the validation of the Amendment Act is sub judice in the Supreme Court of India.

NLSIU releases provisional admission list amid allegations of injustice; 60 Karnataka students across categories
First ASER survey after pandemic frames the disruption in learning, and its revivalPremium Story
The Indian Express | 1 week ago | |
The Indian Express
1 week ago | |

After a gap of four years, the national ASER survey was back in the field in 2022, reaching 616 rural districts of the country to understand children’s enrollment status and basic reading and arithmetic ability. The Covid pandemic had caused schools to shut down in March 2020, and India had one of the longest school closures in the world — primary schools were closed for almost two years. The impact of the pandemic on the education sector was feared to be twofold — learning loss associated with long school closures, and higher dropout rates, especially among older children, due to squeezed family budgets.During the Covid period, ASER looked for opportunities to go back to the field and was able to conduct representative surveys in three states in 2021 — Karnataka in February, Chhattisgarh in October and West Bengal in December. Estimates from these three state-level surveys could be used to understand the extent of children’s learning losses. These state level estimates are extremely useful as they are the only ASER estimates of learning we have between 2018 and 2022.For the country as a whole, learning levels had been rising slowly between 2014 and 2018, after being stagnant for several years. For example, at the all-India level, the proportion of children in Class III who could read a Class II level text (a proxy for grade-level reading) had risen from 23.6 per cent in 2014 to 27.2 per cent in 2018. ASER 2022 shows a big drop in this proportion to 20.5 per cent. This 7 percentage point fall is huge, given how slowly the all-India numbers move and confirms fears of large learning losses caused by the pandemic. In math also, learning levels had risen slowly between 2014 and 2018. The 2022 estimates show a drop here as well although much smaller than in the case of reading.However, the four-year period between these measurements encompasses both the period of school closures as well as the initial six to eight months after school reopening, depending on the state. As mentioned earlier, ASER managed to assess learning levels in three states — Karnataka, Chhattisgarh and West Bengal – in 2021, when schools were still closed or had just reopened. While these are not national estimates, they provide an interim measurement that is more reflective of pandemic-induced learning losses than the estimates for 2022. Across all three states, there were large learning losses in both reading and math in 2021 — in excess of 7 percentage points, except in the case of Std V in West Bengal. The loss in reading is a little higher, though not by much. In both reading and math, the 2021 learning levels in these three states fell below their 2014 levels. A year later, ASER 2022 data shows that across all three states, there has been a recovery in both reading and math (except Karnataka in reading and West Bengal in reading in Std V) after schools reopened in 2021-22. In other words, while the 2022 learning levels were still below or in some cases close to the 2018 levels, comparing 2018 with 2022 hides the dramatic fall in learning levels observed between these two points and the subsequent recovery that has happened in the last year.Another big development during 2020-21 was the introduction of the new National Education Policy (NEP) in 2020. For the first time, there was a big focus on the early years and the importance of foundational competencies. Once schools reopened, states moved quickly and almost all states have made a major push in the area of Foundational Literacy and Numeracy (FLN) under the NIPUN Bharat mission (National Initiative for Proficiency in Reading with Understanding and Numeracy). This push is reflected in the ASER 2022 data. As part of the survey, ASER field investigators visited one government school in each of the sampled village to record enrollment, attendance and school facilities. This year we also asked whether schools had received any directive from the government to implement FLN activities in the school and whether teachers had been trained on FLN. At the all-India level, 81 per cent schools responded that they had received such a directive and 83 per cent said that at least one teacher in the school had been trained on FLN.Extrapolating from the experience of the three states for which we have 2021 data, we can assume that other states also experienced large learning losses during the pandemic. However, once schools reopened, states made a concerted effort to build or re-build foundational competencies, which has resulted in a partial and in some cases, a full recovery. The extent of the recovery varies across states depending on how long their schools were closed as well as when they initiated learning recovery measures. For instance, Chhattisgarh was one of the earliest states to reopen their primary schools in July 2021, giving them a longer period to work with children, as compared to, for instance, Himachal Pradesh or Maharashtra, where schools reopened much later. Taking into account the 2021 figures, the 2022 estimates for Chhattisgarh point to a remarkable recovery, in both reading and math, that is hidden if we just compare 2022 with 2018. In the absence of a 2021 measurement for other states, it is difficult to say what the original pandemic-induced learning loss was — from which states are aiming to recover.Now that the NEP has set clear FLN goals for the entire country, states can find different pathways to achieve these goals. While there have been learning losses, there has also been recovery once the schools reopened. Accounting for all the interim measurements, ASER 2022 estimates tell a story of recovery rather than one of loss.The writer is Director ASER Centre

First ASER survey after pandemic frames the disruption in learning, and its revivalPremium Story
  • ASER 2022: Pandemic affected learning, dip in reading, basic maths
  • The Indian Express

    A significant dip in the abilities to read and calculate, by as much as 6.7 and 2.2 percentage points among class 2 students between 2018 and 2022, is among the major findings in the latest Annual Status of Education Report (ASER), which has also picked up signs of recovery ever since schools started reopening after long Covid-induced closures.The report, released Wednesday, marks the return of a key national survey that captures the state of foundational literacy and numeracy in the country. Steered by the Pratham Foundation, ASER reports have been released annually since 2005.“This fall is a huge drop, given how slowly the all-India numbers move, and confirms fears of large learning losses caused by the pandemic,” according to Director ASER Centre Wilima Wadhwa.Wadhwa’s view that the all-India numbers move slowly is backed by numbers. For instance, between 2014 and 2018, learning levels had been rising gradually, with the proportion of class 3 children who could read a standard II text increasing from 23.6 per cent to 27.2 per cent.That stood at 20.5 per cent in 2022. Likewise, the share of children in class 5 who could read standard II level text rose from 48 per cent in 2014 to 50.4 per cent in 2018, but fell to 42.8 per cent in 2022.The survey covered 7 lakh children across 616 districts and was conducted by 27,536 volunteers. It was last carried out at this scale in 2018 as after the outbreak of Covid-19, ASER became phone-based and turned its focus on exploring digital inequality and enrollment levels in schools.The drop in numeracy levels has been smaller compared to the dip in reading skills, states the survey. Like in the case of reading, math learning levels had also been steadily rising before the pandemic disrupted the school education system, which was marred by stark inequality as crores of children struggled to cope with the switch to digital modes.Overall, the proportion of children in class 3 who could do at least subtraction rose from 25.3 per cent in 2014 to 28.1 per cent in 2018. Among students of class 5, who could solve a simple division problem, the share rose from 26 per cent in 2014 to 27.8 per cent in 2018.In 2022, the numbers were down to 25.9 per cent and 25.6 per cent respectively. “Clearly, the pandemic has resulted in learning loss. However, what the ASER 2022 figures seem to suggest is that the loss is much greater in reading as compared to arithmetic,” said Wadhwa.However, over the last one year, signs of recovery have also sprouted. The clearest indication comes from a comparative analysis of learning outcomes in Karnataka, Chhattisgarh and West Bengal between 2021 and 2022. These are the only states where Pratham had undertaken learning outcome surveys even in 2021.In Chhattisgarh, where the proportion of class 3 children who can read basic text had dropped to an alarming 12.3 per cent in 2021, bounced back to 24.2 per cent in 2022. In West Bengal, it rose from 29.5 per cent in 2021 to 33 per cent in 2022.In case of maths, the share of children in class 3  having the ability to solve basic problems rose dramatically from 9 per cent in 2021 to 19.6 per cent in 2022. In Karnataka and West Bengal, it rose from 17.3 per cent to 22.2 per cent respectively and 29.4 per cent to 34.2 per cent respectively.“Extrapolating from the experience of the three states for which we have 2021 data, we can assume that other states also experienced large learning losses during the pandemic. However, once schools reopened, states made a concerted effort to build or re-build foundational competencies, which has resulted in a partial and in some cases, a full recovery,” said Wadhwa.While the last few rounds of ASER did not capture the state of foundational learning, the government conducted a study through the NCERT in 2022 to find out whether students were picking up basic skills on literacy and numeracy. The findings of that study mirror some of the trends that ASER has picked up.The NCERT study had found that as many as 37 per cent of students enrolled in class 3 have very limited foundational numeracy skills such as identifying numbers, and carry out simple mathematical operations, while even the most basic knowledge is absent in 11 per cent learners.

Class VIII kids unable to read texts, do arithmetic from Class II: Survey
Times of India | 1 week ago | |
Times of India
1 week ago | |

MUMBAI: While enrolment in schools in rural Maharashtra and across the country has gone up, students’ reading and arithmetic skills, even at higher levels like Class V and Class VIII, remain below par.The Annual Status of Education Report (ASER) 2022 by Pratham Foundation is the first field-based nationwide household survey after a gap of four years. It provides a snapshot of children’s schooling and learning in rural India.Almost 7 lakh children aged 5-16 across 3. 74 lakh households were tested one-on one to understand their reading, arithmetic and English skills. In Maharashtra and other states, students in higher classes like III, V and VIII were unable to read texts and perform arithmetic taught in Class II. In the entire survey, Class II was kept as the benchmark to gauge a student’s lite-racy and numeracy skills.In Maharashtra, only 75% Class VIII students could read text meant for Class II. In 2018, it was around 80%. In case of Class V, only around 45% students in both government and private schools could read Class II text. Only 30% go-vernment and 26% private school students from Class III could read text from their previous year.Higher class students’ understanding of arithmetic like division and subtraction was also below par. In 2022, around 35% Class VIII stu-dents were able to perform division. In 2018, the percentage was around 40% for government and private schools. In arithmetic, Class VIII students were bad at subtraction meant for Class II. The survey highlighted the urgent need to catch up in grades IV and V.

Class VIII kids unable to read texts, do arithmetic from Class II: Survey
Maharashtra Elementary Drawing Exam Result 2022 declared on doa.maharashtra.gov.in, direct link here
Times of India | 1 week ago | |
Times of India
1 week ago | |

Elementary Drawing Exam 2022: The Directorate of Arts, Maharashtra has announced the Elementary Drawing Exam Result 2022 today, on January 19, 2023. Candidates who took the exam can check and download the results from the official websites at dge.doamh.in and doa.maharashtra.gov.in.Candidates can check their result by simply logging in the 'Candidate Seat Number' on the official portal. The result will have the marks scored in various subjects including Memory Drawing, Object Drawing, Design and Plane Geometry & Lettering. The Maharashtra Elementary Drawing Exam was conducted on September 28 and 29, 2022 in two shifts.Important Note: The Intermediate and Elementary Drawing Grade Examination Certificate is available to download in Center & School Login.Elementary Grade Exam Result 2022Candidates can download the Drawing Exam result by following the below mentioned steps.Direct Link: Check Elementary Drawing Exam Result 2022How to check Maharashtra Elementary Exam Result 2022Step 1. Visit the official website at dge.doamh.inStep 2. On the homepage, go to 'Result' and click on the line that reads, "View Elementary Grade Exam Result" Step 3. A new page will open, login using the candidate's seat numberStep 4. Your exam result will open on the screenStep 5. Download and take a printout of the result for future referenceRead AlsoMaharashtra Intermediate Drawing Exam Result 2023 announced on doa.maharashtra.gov.inThe Maharashtra Intermediate Drawing Exam Result 2023 has been announced today, on January 16, 2023. Candidates who took the exam can check their results online at the official website. To check the results, you will need to login using your seat number. Check out the article below for more details.Candidates may note that the Maharashtra Intermediate Drawing Exam 2022 result was released on January 16, 2023. Now, the Directorate of Arts, Maharashtra has announced the result for Elementary Grade Exam-2022.

Maharashtra Elementary Drawing Exam Result 2022 declared on doa.maharashtra.gov.in, direct link here
  • Maharashtra: Slide in Marathi reading & arithmetic in rural schools
  • Times of India

    PUNE: Students in primary schools in rural Maharashtra are struggling in reading and arithmetic according to the Annual Status of Education Report (ASER) 2022 conducted across India in 616 districts with almost seven lakh students participating. The last such survey was in 2018. The study also found that English reading levels have gone up among students in Stds V to VIII.The percentage of students in Stds III to V who can read Std II level textbooks in Marathi dropped from 55.5% in 2018 to 41.4% in 2022. It also fell for Stds VI to VIII from 77.5% to 71% for the two years. In arithmetic, students in Stds III to V who could do simple subtraction came down from 44.8% in 2018 to 34.9% in 2022. Just 30.2 % of pupils in Stds VI to VIII could carry out division when compared to 38.3% in 2018. The setbacks are being attributed to the closure of schools and the shift to online learning during the Covid-19 pandemic peak. Educators have been concerned about loss of learning in young students. Many said it would take years to erase the slate. Eminent mathematician Mangala Narlikar said the findings of ASER are quite depressing. "They were not good for 2018 but with schools shut for Covid-19 for two years, studies have suffered. Not many students had access to cellphones or tablets and the communication on internet is not as satisfactory as in a classroom," she said. Reading and arithmetic, both need a lot of practice with capable and enthusiastic teachers. "Parents too spent more time at home in Covid times, and could have helped children with arithmetic and reading. Local youths can also fill in the gap," she said.Vasant Kalpande, former director of education and an education activist, said even though the state government had launched online learning, it hardly made any impact at the elementary level. He said that students in the 6-14 age group in upper primary classes need a school and a teacher to study, and online classes can only be supplementary to the actual classroom education. "Teachers were also uncomfortable with the online method which affected lesson planning and core academic activities. Education suffered even in schools with the best facilities during the pandemic, so the impact on rural education is even worse. The education department must strengthen its teaching-learning method to tide over the learning loss," Kalpande said.He also said that English reading levels may have gone up due to exposure to cartoons, cellphones and online games. Children are sending messages, and operating cellphones, all of which require them to be conversant with the language, he added.Vikas Garad, former assistant director MSCERT, said the ASER report has always pointed out a high number of students who cannot read or do simple arithmetic. If 60% of students in Std VIII could not do division in 2016, the same students when they appeared for SSC exams in 2018 had a pass percentage of about 89%, Garad said. "Every year, NGOs approach the education department to improve education in the state. Does this mean that none have made the slightest impact ?" he said.The schools fared better on RTE parameters. Many more had drinking water, electricity and computers than they did in 2018. But in other parameters like the midday meal, toilets and libraries, they fared poorer than they had done four years ago.

  • Maharashtra Intermediate Drawing Exam Result 2023 announced on doa.maharashtra.gov.in
  • Times of India

    NEW DELHI: The Directorate of Arts, Maharashtra has announced the Intermediate Drawing Exam Result 2023 today i.e., January 16. Candidates who have appeared in the examination can check and download their results from the official websites - dge.doamh.in or doa.maharashtra.gov.in.Maharashtra Intermediate Drawing Exam 2023 was held on September 30 and October 01, 2022 in offline mode. The examination was conducted for a duration of 02 hours for each shift i.e., from 10:30 AM to 01:30 PM and 02:30 PM to 04:30 PM on both the dates respectively.In order to check the result online, candidates would be required to login using their Seat Numbers.Maharashtra Intermediate Drawing Exam Result 2023Direct link to download resultHow to check Maharashtra Intermediate Drawing Exam Result 2023?Step 1: Visit the official website at dge.doamh.inStep 2: On the homepage, tap on Result.Step 3: You will be redirected to another window.Step 4: Now click on the link available for Intermediate Result.Step 5: Enter your Hall Ticket Number and Submit.Step 6: Your Maha intermediate drawing result 2023 will be displayed on the screen.Step 7: Download the same and get a hard copy for further references.All those candidates who qualify the examination will be able to get their certificates from the admitted institution. For more related information and details candidates are advised to visit the official website.

3 Pune runners set off to cover 338 km in 72 hours to raise diabetes awareness
The Indian Express | 1 week ago | |
The Indian Express
1 week ago | |

Three Pune ultramarathoners, sports shop owner and blueBrigade running club founder Ajay Desai, merchant navy officer and film producer Prashant Pethe, and trekker and fitness coach Shyamal Mondal, began a run on Wednesday to create awareness about diabetes. The runners plan to run a distance of 338 km individually and aim to finish the run in 72 hours.Shiksha Education Society’s Innovera school in Loni will be their base and the runners will run in a loop of 25 km towards Ramdara temple and back – a route used for the annual Pune Ultra Marathon.Desai, who has diabetes and suffers from hypertension, said he set up blueBrigade in 2015 to impart the knowledge he gained by controlling his ailments just by running. From just 10 people when it began, the blueBrigade running club now has over 600 members and functions at eight different locations in Pune.While Yusuf Devaswala, an architect, and Satej Kalyani, a software engineer, will run 161 km each in support of the three main runners, other runners from blueBrigade will also run and support them, Desai said.The main objective of this run is to “create awareness about diabetes – the real pandemic” and to raise donations for Nityaasha Foundation, which works with underprivileged children with Type 1 diabetes, Desai added.Several celebrities from the Marathi film industry are supporting the run, helping it reach a wider audience.Training with blueBrigade is free of cost. In December 2021, six blueBrigade runners ran from Pune to Kolhapur, a distance of 220 km, and raised around Rs 2.5 lakh for Nityaasha Foundation.

3 Pune runners set off to cover 338 km in 72 hours to raise diabetes awareness
Maharashtra govt sets up 11-member panel for National Education Policy
Times of India | 1 week ago | |
Times of India
1 week ago | |

MUMBAI: The state has set up a 11-member committee of various departments to implement the National Education Policy (NEP) 2020 in schools. This is in addition to a committee set up in June last year to examine the various aspects of the NEP.Various departments, including women and child development, tribal development have been included in the committee to help implement the 297 tasks finalized under the NEP in a phased manner across states.The NEP for schools includes three-years of pre-schooling that has been incorporated into the formal education system. In Maharashtra, two committees were set up in April last year for implementation of the NEP in higher and technical education.

Maharashtra govt sets up 11-member panel for National Education Policy
  • Delhi University forms panel to create centre for hindu studies
  • The Indian Express

    Delhi University has established a 17-member committee to create a centre for “Hindu Studies” that will provide courses on the “history of Hindus” in the university, according to an official. Prakash Singh, the director of DU’s South Delhi Campus, will head the panel. A member of the academic council, however, questioned the need for such a centre.“There are around 23 universities across India that offer courses in Hindu studies. DU also thought it must also have a centre for Hindu studies,” Singh told PTI. “We have a centre for Buddhist studies but not a centre for Hindu studies. We thought let’s see whether it is viable to open a centre for Hindu studies,” He added.He emphasised that the panel’s attention would be on first determining the centre’s viability and then introducing courses in accordance with that.“First we will introduce courses in postgraduate and research and later we might introduce UG courses,” Singh stated. The committee will decide how many courses will be introduced and whether courses will be introduced this year or next. The panel also plans to present the framework before the academic council in the near future, he further said.An academic council member, who did not wish to be named, has opposed the need for the centre while stating, “Where are other centres, Sikh, Muslim and other centres. The university must also open courses for these other religions,”“Unfortunately, we only see religious part of Hindu, Hindu is a way of life. Religion is only an aspect of it, we have thousands of years of history. The centre will focus on this aspect,” Singh said.Other members of the committee includes Prof Payal Mago, Director, Campus of Open Learning; Prof K Ratnabali, Dean, Academic Affairs, Dean, Faculty of Science, Dean, Faculty of Social Science, Dean, Faculty of Arts; Prof Seema Bawa, Head, Department of History; Prof Sangit Kumar Ragi, Head, Department of Political Science and Prof Anil Kumar Aneja, Head, Department of English.Prof Ranjan Kumar Tripathi, Joint Dean of Colleges; Dr Jaswinder Singh, Principal, SGTB Khalsa College; Prof C Sheela Reddy, Principal, Sri Venkateswara College; Prof A K Singh, Head and Dean, Faculty of Commerce; Prof V S Negi, EC Member, Shaheed Bhagat Singh Evening College; Dr Aditya Gupta, Department of Philosophy; Dr Prerna Malhotra, Department of English and Sh Jay Chanda, Joint Registrar (Academic) are also part of the panel..

Happy new year. Now please stay home.
The Indian Express | 2 weeks ago | |
The Indian Express
2 weeks ago | |

Written by Alyson KruegerJulie Vadnal was visiting family in Michigan over Christmas when everyone “started to drop like flies,” she said. “The day we left, my mom had gotten a fever, and my sister had gotten a fever, and it was like, we have to get out of here.”Vadnal, 37, an editor who lives in New York, succumbed to what she described as a “flulike cold,” a few days before New Year’s Eve.Turns out, it wasn’t the worst time to be sick.It gave her an out for the holiday. “I do not like making New Year’s Eve plans,” she said. “I love sitting on the couch and watching Andy Cohen and Anderson Cooper, and this year I got to do it guilt free.”And she wasn’t the only one who was sick: When she returned to work on Jan. 2, she learned that three of her colleagues were sick, as well as someone’s husband. So there weren’t many disruptions to her social life. “I don’t feel like I am missing out on any events, because there aren’t any,” she said.January is normally a quiet month, as people return home from holiday celebrations. But this year it has been even quieter, as many of them were too sick to head back into offices or classrooms. Those who are well enough may find they are one of just a few not coughing or sneezing.Public health officials have warned of a “tripledemic,” a convergence of COVID-19, the flu and RSV. While peaking at different times, these three respiratory illnesses have made the last month difficult for many families.Holiday parties and family gatherings were probably somewhat responsible for the spread of diseases. As of Dec. 31, most of the country had a very high or high level of influenza, according to data released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In the new year, COVID hospitalizations rose to levels not seen since last winter.In the pandemic era, the first two weeks of January seem to have become the time for getting sick.Those who have fallen ill are taking solace in the fact that at least they are not alone. Some say their offices are empty after the holidays with people calling in sick. Many people who haven’t yet become ill are expecting to. Some feel that it is so inevitable that they are hesitant to make plans for the foreseeable future.A 36-year-old woman who works in luxury fashion in New York — and didn’t want to be named for fear of insulting colleagues — has been booking conference rooms to escape the germs in her office.“I would rather be huddled around my laptop in a conference room than be out in our open working space with my monitor,” she said.She said she noticed the coughing and sneezing the second she stepped foot into her office after a two-week hiatus. “The sounds started at 9 a.m. on Tuesday during the coffee hour,” she said. “I wasn’t sure why these sick people didn’t stay home. It was pretty gross.”She believes many people are sick because if they test negative for COVID-19, they decide it is safe to go out, even if they have cold or flu symptoms.Others have been playing the now familiar “Is the tickle in my throat COVID?” game. Except now it could be the flu or another illness, too.“As of right now all I have is this weird tickle in my throat,” said Jaimie Caiazzo, 30, a New York resident who works remotely in public relations. “Every time I do something like take a nap or need to close my eyes I think, am I sick or am I being delusional?”“I am feeling like I am waiting for the shoe to drop,” she added.Her fiance, whom she lives with, came down with the flu (he tested positive at the doctor’s office) on Jan. 2, the day he was supposed to return to work. So far she’s managed to avoid it, but she doesn’t know how long she’ll be able to. For now, she is trying to lay low.She has mixed feelings about getting sick this time of year. “I think it helps that the weather is so in and out right now, so if you do get sick you can rest and relax and save yourself for bigger plans later in the year,” she said.But it’s also a busy time for her line of work, and she doesn’t want to use sick days so early in the year. She added: “But if I do get sick I know people will understand because there seems to be this expectation that people will get sick now.”Some people have started to question if groups should gather in-person in the first few weeks of the year at all.Jerald Stiedaman, 47, who works for a creative agency and lives in Evanston, Illinois, is thrilled his daughter, who is in fifth grade, didn’t start school until this week. “Our local school district set it up this way for the first time this year,” he said. “It kind of gives a little bit more separation and space if people are going to get sick from the holiday gatherings.”He knows many of his daughter’s friends were traveling over the holidays. He knows at least some of them will bring home bugs, and he’s relieved that they probably won’t reach his daughter — at least for now.“Our daughter has not yet tested positive for COVID,” he said. “We would like to keep it that way.”(This article originally appeared in The New York Times.)📣 For more lifestyle news, follow us on Instagram | Twitter | Facebook and don’t miss out on the latest updates!

Happy new year. Now please stay home.
In The Last of Us, Bella Ramsey might save the world
The Indian Express | 2 weeks ago | |
The Indian Express
2 weeks ago | |

Written by Douglas Greenwood   After news came out about Bella Ramsey’s casting as one of the main characters in HBO’s new zombie thriller, “The Last of Us,” the actor went online to see how it was going over. It was a rough education.“It’s the first time I’ve ever had a negative reaction to something,” said Ramsey, who was 17 at the time.It became a kind of addiction. She returned again and again to the commentary about her appearance and perceived limitations, focusing primarily on the nasty remarks because she “didn’t believe” the positive ones, she said.“There would be times I’d find it funny,” Ramsey, now 19, recalled over lunch at a restaurant here last month. “Then I’d get to the end of a 10-minute scrolling session, put my phone down and realize: Maybe that was a bad idea.”It was a quick, merciless introduction to the new level and nature of the exposure that will come from “The Last of Us,” about a fictional America decimated by a deadly fungal contagion and a girl, played by Ramsey, who is touted as the potential cure. Premiering Sunday on HBO, it comes with high expectations from a fervent audience, thanks to its source material: The 2013 video game on which it is based has sold more than 20 million copies, earned widespread critical acclaim and spawned a sequel. (Both games have also been plagued by a vocal minority of toxic fans bemoaning the inclusion of LGBTQ characters and other elements.)Ramsey has been a working actor since she was 11, when she signed on to “Game of Thrones” and made a memorable professional debut as headstrong house leader Lyanna Mormont. After “Game of Thrones” came several British children’s series; the BBC/HBO adaptation of “His Dark Materials”; and, most recently, an acclaimed starring role in Lena Dunham’s 2022 coming-of-age period comedy, “Catherine Called Birdy.”“The Last of Us,” however, brings Ramsey’s biggest role to date. She plays Ellie, a teenage girl who, being immune to the disease that has wiped out much of the Earth’s population, is possibly the key to humanity’s survival. Whether and how she might become so is the focus of much of the first season, with Ellie hitting the road and dodging fungal zombies with an increasingly paternal smuggler named Joel, played by Pedro Pascal (“The Mandalorian”).While “Game of Thrones” had given Ramsey experience working on a show of extravagant scale, “The Last of Us” is the first time she has played a lead role in one. But Neil Druckmann and Craig Mazin, the creators of the show, said that from the beginning, they knew Ramsey was right for the job.“We were looking for a specific combination of contradictions: Someone that can be funny and quirky, and violent and rough,” Druckmann, who also led development of the game, said in a phone interview. When he saw Ramsey’s audition tape, he said, “I didn’t see Bella acting like Ellie — I saw Ellie.”Once filming started, Mazin (“Chernobyl”) was impressed by Ramsey’s ability to challenge herself on set. “She would push through occasional bouts of self-doubt, anxiety or panic and rise above it,” he wrote in an email. “There are few people better between the words ‘action’ and ‘cut.’”For Ramsey, however, confidence in her abilities can still be elusive.“It’s only recently that I’ve accepted I am Ellie, and I can do it, and I am a good actor,” she said. “But this will last for a few weeks and then I’ll think I’m terrible again. That’s just the process.”In person, Ramsey evinces little of this or any other flavor of insecurity. She is sharp and good-humored, joking about spending her last day as a 17-year-old shooting a gruesome scene in which Ellie stabs an infected person. (“It was wonderful.”) She enjoyed being on set so much, she said, that she was sad that her 18th birthday fell on a day off.Born in Nottingham, England, Ramsey grew up in the nearby county of Leicestershire. She was 3 when she followed her sister into an amateur theater group, and she never looked back, spending much of her childhood in after-school drama clubs. At 10, she joined the Television Workshop in Nottingham, which counts actors Samantha Morton and Jack O’Connell among its alumni. Iain Smith, a former workshop director, remembered Ramsey’s standout performance in a production the school staged, playing a teacher who turns into a cow.“She was stratospheric in terms of her commitment to it,” he said in a phone interview. “It was uncanny.”Ramsey’s efforts at the workshop led to the audition for “Game of Thrones.” Her Lyanna Mormont, who joined the show in Season 6, became an instant fan favorite, with a grit and intensity that belied the character’s (and the actor’s) tender age.This commitment is a quality Ramsey still possesses, according to Joe Alwyn, who starred alongside her in the medieval period comedy “Catherine Called Birdy.” In an email, Alwyn wrote that Ramsey, who played the headstrong title character, was “full of a childlike energy and a willingness to jump in and play, whilst also carrying a maturity and awareness way beyond her years.”Last month, “Catherine Called Birdy” earned Ramsey a Critics Choice Award nomination for best young actor/actress. (The awards will be handed out Sunday night.) The non-gender-specific category was pleasing for a person who has long reckoned with gender identity — as a child, Ramsey loved being mistaken for a boy by strangers, she said.“I guess my gender has always been very fluid,” she said. “Someone would call me ‘she’ or ‘her’ and I wouldn’t think about it, but I knew that if someone called me ‘he,’ it was a bit exciting.”Now, if she sees “nonbinary” as an option on a form, she will tick it. “I’m very much just a person,” she said. “Being gendered isn’t something that I particularly like, but in terms of pronouns, I really couldn’t care less.”Ramsey has used her art to help her process other aspects of her life. She returned recently to a film script she began when she was 14, a project inspired partly by her own experience with anorexia nervosa. (In 2018, Ramsey posted on social media about her diagnosis and the part religion played in her recovery, although her relationship with faith is “a lot quieter” today, she said.) The script, which has “developed and matured” over the past five years, she said, is about a teenage girl living with an eating disorder and the “imperfect relationships and complicated people” she surrounds herself with.Ramsey asked some past collaborators to read an early draft, and one person who did was Oscar-nominated actor and filmmaker Jesse Eisenberg, a co-star in the 2020 war drama “Resistance.” In a phone interview, Eisenberg said the script was “insightful and written with great emotional depth.” What strikes him about Ramsey, he said, is that she exhibits “her generation’s thoughtfulness, but on the other hand she seems to have this amazing self awareness too.”“Bella is like a Rosetta stone for young people,” he added.Ramsey has never been much of a gamer, but she was aware of “The Last of Us” when her agent emailed an audition script and Ellie’s character description. She was immediately drawn to the role, she said, and felt attached to Ellie “for reasons I couldn’t describe.”After Ramsey won the part, Druckmann and Mazin advised her not to play the game in order to prepare. Instead, the actor watched YouTube clips of significant gameplay scenes, she said, in order “to feel confident that the Ellie I felt inside of me, under my skin, was the right one.”Ramsey didn’t meet Pascal in person until preproduction began in Calgary, Alberta, in July 2021, on the same day she had to cut off more than 15 inches of her hair for the role. (She still has it stored in a bag.)“It was very brief and special,” Ramsey said of their initial meeting. “We got on but were shy of each other because of how much was riding on our relationship.” Instead, she said, “we got to know each other as Joel and Ellie got to know each other.”The characters’ centrality to the story led to a closeness between the actors, Pascal noted. “For the year we were shooting in Alberta, it was primarily the two of us, with other actors and directors coming and going,” he wrote in an email. “We clung to each other for dear life.”During the nearly yearlong shoot, Ramsey lived within a “bubble” almost totally removed from the outside world, owing to her demanding shooting schedule and to strict COVID-19 protocols that made it difficult to explore Calgary in her downtime. As a result, maintaining an emotional separation between herself and her character was more difficult than usual, she said.“People always ask, at the end of a shoot day, how I get back into being Bella,” she said. “But I didn’t know how to do that with Ellie because we were so intertwined.” Sometimes, she woke up talking in Ellie’s American accent.In the lead-up to the release of “The Last of Us,” Ramsey has found life “hectic in ways that I’m not used to,” she said. But it is a welcome change after the break she has taken from filming since the shoot wrapped in June, her longest since she was 11. “I don’t know what relaxing is, and I’ve never been very good at it,” she said.She has filled the time studying environmental science as part of a university distance-learning course and preparing for her driving test. She plans to eventually leave Leicestershire and move to London.It is all part of an arc toward independence that the former child actor, now an adult, said she is still getting used to. “There was a time I was so anxious, I couldn’t leave the house,” she said. “So, now knowing one day I could live by myself is exciting to me.”Making “The Last of Us” was part of this process, Ramsey said: “I feel like my world has just expanded.”

In The Last of Us, Bella Ramsey might save the world
Chhattisgarh CGSOS Class 10, 12 board exam datesheet announced
The Indian Express | 2 weeks ago | |
The Indian Express
2 weeks ago | |

CGSOS Class 10, 12 datesheet 2023: The Chhattisgarh State Open School (CGSOS) board today released the board exams datesheet for classes 10, 12. Candidates can download the exam schedule from the official website – sos.cg.gov.inAs per the schedule, the higher secondary exams will be held from March 26 to May 2 and the high school exams will be held from April 1 and May 2. Read |New NCERT manual on transgender students silent on caste, patriarchyThe exams will be conducted from 8:45 am to 11:45 am. Students have to take their seats by 8:30 am in the exam hall post which the answer sheets will be distributed at 8:35 am. Candidates will be given 10 minutes time to read the question paper from 8:35 am to 8:45 am. Meanwhile, CGBSE has also released the board exams time table for regular students. Class 10 (high school) exams will begin from March 2, 2023 and will conclude on March 24, 2023. Class 12 (higher secondary) will commence March 1, 2023 and  conclude on March 31, 2023.  As per the schedule, the higher secondary exams will be held from March 26 to May 2 and the high school exams will be held from April 1 and May 2. Read |New NCERT manual on transgender students silent on caste, patriarchyThe exams will be conducted from 8:45 am to 11:45 am. Students have to take their seats by 8:30 am in the exam hall post which the answer sheets will be distributed at 8:35 am. Candidates will be given 10 minutes time to read the question paper from 8:35 am to 8:45 am. Meanwhile, CGBSE has also released the board exams time table for regular students. Class 10 (high school) exams will begin from March 2, 2023 and will conclude on March 24, 2023. Class 12 (higher secondary) will commence March 1, 2023 and  conclude on March 31, 2023.  The exams will be conducted from 8:45 am to 11:45 am. Students have to take their seats by 8:30 am in the exam hall post which the answer sheets will be distributed at 8:35 am. Candidates will be given 10 minutes time to read the question paper from 8:35 am to 8:45 am. Meanwhile, CGBSE has also released the board exams time table for regular students. Class 10 (high school) exams will begin from March 2, 2023 and will conclude on March 24, 2023. Class 12 (higher secondary) will commence March 1, 2023 and  conclude on March 31, 2023.  Meanwhile, CGBSE has also released the board exams time table for regular students. Class 10 (high school) exams will begin from March 2, 2023 and will conclude on March 24, 2023. Class 12 (higher secondary) will commence March 1, 2023 and  conclude on March 31, 2023.   

Chhattisgarh CGSOS Class 10, 12 board exam datesheet announced