Engineering admissions cross 1-lakh mark in Maharashtra this year

Times of India | 5 days ago | 23-11-2022 | 04:28 am

Engineering admissions cross 1-lakh mark in Maharashtra this year

MUMBAI: Engineering education in Maharashtra once again saw a high this year. When the admission counters closed, the number of students who confirmed BTech seats went up to 1.09 lakh. Last year's corresponding number was 88,986. Computer science was most preferred with almost every seat being taken, and courses like robotics and agriculture technology had absolutely no takers. On Tuesday evening, the CET shared the admission data for BE and BTech admissions in state engineering colleges which showed that out of a total of 1.45 lakh seats, 35,702 remained unfilled after all rounds of the centralised admission process. Interestingly, 68 of the 70 seats for engineering in regional language have also been filled. Chandrashekhar Kulkarni, a senior faculty member at Thadomal Shahani College of Engineering, attributed the increased student interest to the fact that better class XII results saw more candidates taking the entrance test. Second, results of IIT Advanced were rather poor, which saw students migrate to colleges of the state, he added. Picture this, in the case of computer engineering - 21,058 seats of the 22,051 are filled. Newer programmes in artificial intelligence, machine learning, internet of things, block chain technology and data science also have almost entirely booked. Electronics and telecommunication technology also saw good numbers opting to join the programme; being the third largest branch in terms of the number of seats, its popularity soared this year with 15,598 (17,364 seats) candidates opting for it. However, mechanical engineering which has the lion's share of seats in Maharashtra - 24,819 - somewhat saw fewer students opt for it. With almost 50% vacancy, merely 12,229 students took up seats in this core branch. Similar is the case with civil engineering with merely 7,271 students accepting the 18,622 available seats. "Interest in emerging areas of computer and IT had picked up ever since the AICTE gave them the approval. Even in the first year, most of the seats were filled. But this year, making a choice was tough. Everywhere in the technology space, students were hearing of lay-offs. Yet, most feel this is a phase and technology will have a bigger role to play in the coming days," said senior computer science faculty member Vaibhav Narawde.

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