Less than 20 students in 6106 govt schools in Himachal Pradesh, shows UDISE report

The Indian Express | 1 week ago | 24-11-2022 | 02:45 pm

Less than 20 students in 6106 govt schools in Himachal Pradesh, shows UDISE report

As per a report, there are less than 20 students in 6106 government schools in Himachal Pradesh. These include 5113 primary and 993 middle schools.The number ranges between 21-60 in 4478 primary and 895 middle schools and 61 to 100 in 681 primary and 47 middle schools, a recent report by Unified District Information System for Education stated.There are 18,028 schools in the state of which 15,313 are government-run.According to the report, there are 65,973 teachers in government schools including 39,906 male and 26,257 female.However, 12 primary government schools are running without a teacher while 2,969 have one teacher, 5,533 have two teachers and 1,779 have three teachers, it stated.Similarly, 51 middle schools are being run by a single teacher, 416 by two teachers, 773 by three teachers and 701 by four to six teachers, it said.The report also stated that one secondary school with minimum of ten classes is being run by two teachers, ten schools by three teachers, 212 by four to six teachers and 710 by seven to ten teachers.Even the senior secondary schools are facing a shortage of teachers and 22 schools are running with four to six teachers, 189 with seven to ten teachers, 684 with 11 to 15 teachers and 981 schools have more than 15 teachers.Further, the report pointed out that despite 63,690 rooms in government schools, seven primary schools are without a room, 338 are running in one room, 2,495 in two rooms, 4,111 in three rooms and 3,402 in seven to ten rooms. Meanwhile, three middle schools are without a room, 216 have only one room, 241 are running in two rooms,1,111 in three rooms and 352 in four to six rooms.The situation is no better in secondary and senior secondary schools with a minimum of ten and 12 classes respectively. As many as six secondary schools are being run in one room, 25 in two rooms, 117 in three rooms, 697 in four to six rooms and 74 in seven to ten rooms.Similarly, one senior secondary school in the state is functioning in a single room, seven in two rooms, 17 in three rooms, 245 in four to six rooms, 947 in seven to ten rooms, 454 in 11 to 15 rooms and only 205 schools have more than 15 rooms.Schools have been opened to comply with the guidelines of the Right to Education Act. As per the act, there has to be a primary school within 1.5 km for school-going children but due to tough demography and topography in the hill state, the strength of students is low but still they have to be taught. However, the rationalism of teachers is an issue, officials in the education department said.The student-teacher ratio is 14.68 in primary section, 12.09 in middle schools, 10.38 in secondary and 12.31 in senior secondary schools, they said.The general enrollment is 100 per cent or above in primary, middle and secondary level and 90 per cent in the senior secondary level while the dropout rate is zero per cent at primary and elementary level and 1.47 per cent at secondary level, they said.The sustained efforts of the state government to shift students from the government to private schools have yielded results as enrollment in government schools has increased by 37,952 during 2021-2022, the report said.However, enrollment in all schools in the state registered an insignificant decrease of 1,067 as compared to a drop of 26,154 in 2020-21. The total enrollment in all schools dropped from 13,33,315 to 13, 32,148 but the enrollment in 15,313 government schools stood at 8,31,310 in 2021-22 compared to 7.93,358 in the previous year.Director of higher education Amarjeet Sharma said, “Har Ghar Patshala” initiative introduced during the pandemic and the use of information and communication technology in government schools has brought them at par with the private sector and we are now focusing on academics, sports and co curricular activities for the overall development of the children.He said the high fee structure during the pandemic in private schools also compelled parents to shift to government schools.

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Maharashtra: Govt asks universities to offer four-year UG courses in line with NEP
The Indian Express | 2 hours ago | 08-12-2022 | 11:45 am
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2 hours ago | 08-12-2022 | 11:45 am

FROM THE next academic year, expected to begin in June 2023, all undergraduate (UG) degree programmes in Maharashtra will have a tenure of four years, as per the National Education Policy, 2020.In a government resolution (GR) issued late Tuesday, the state higher and technical education department asked all universities to formulate regulations for the same.It also shared recommendations made by the state-level committee headed by Dr Ravindra Kulkarni, former pro-vice chancellor of Mumbai University (MU), preparing a roadmap for implementation of the NEP.According to the recommendations, a student should have option to exit or leave the four-year course after each year.For example, a student will get a certificate if exiting after completing first year, diploma if exiting after two years, bachelor’s degree after three years and bachelor’s degree (honors/reserach) after completing four years.These exists (except the final year) would be possible after completing a bridge course, which would train student in employment skills.Also, students should be allowed to choose the semesters – six in all – they want to join. If one joins the course in semester 1, the student would be allowed to exit only after completing semester 2.The one entering the course in semester 3 would be allowed to leave only after completing semester 4.This would hold true for semesters 5 and 6 too.However, many, especially teachers, have raised concerns about the recommendations.Dr Madhu Parajape, general secretary of Bombay University and College Teachers Union (BUCTU), said: “The government has failed to show any commitment toward financial aspects of these reforms in terms of fees and grants given to aided colleges. Instead, by allowing a student to leave the course in between, the government will encourage dropping out of higher education. There is already a shortage of manpower due to the government’s failure in filling up vacant posts of teachers.”BUCTU had last month taken part in the three-day protest by All India Teachers Federation against NEP, outside the UGC office in Delhi.Many teachers also pointed out the absence of academic councils and boards of studies in most universities, which are responsible to prepare a new curriculum for the reforms.While such bodies are being set up in many state universities, MU still awaits the election process to start.The universities, however, are confident of implementing the recommendations.Vice-Chancellor (V-C) of Shivaji University in Kolhapur,  D T Shirke, who is currently holding the additional charge of MU V-C, said: “There is adequate time to introduce the changes. The national curriculam framework too is ready for reference.”Dr R S Mali, former Vice Chancellor of Kaviyatri Bahinabai North Maharashtra University in Jalgaon, said, “The universities are prepared. All have been aware of the impending changes and with a prescribed roadmap, implementing the reforms should not be an issue.”

Maharashtra: Govt asks universities to offer four-year UG courses in line with NEP
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Times of India | 1 day ago | 07-12-2022 | 07:39 am
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1 day ago | 07-12-2022 | 07:39 am

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Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation schools record lowest dropouts in 10 years
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Times of India | 1 day ago | 07-12-2022 | 04:33 am
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1 day ago | 07-12-2022 | 04:33 am

MUMBAI: Stressing that children should not be denied education for non-payment of fees, the state education department has directed all schools, including private ones and those from non-state boards, to admit students moving schools without insisting on the mandatory transfer certificate (TC), reports Sandhya Nair. During the pandemic, financial constraints and non-payment of fees had led to an exodus from private to aided and government schools. A circular issued Tuesday says schools should rely on birth certificates for age verification of students in classes 1-8. For students in classes 9-10, schools should try and get details from the previous school (uploaded on the portal 'Saral'). Schools from which information has been sought will have to provide details within seven days. School education minister Deepak Kesarkar hints at action if schools insist on transfer certificateSchool education minister Deepak Kesarkar on Tuesday hinted at taking action against schools that insist on transfer certificate. In a move that has surprised educational institutions, all schools have been directed to admit students moving schools without insisting on the mandatory TC. A government resolution to the effect was issued on Tuesday. Kesarkar said despite the drop in Covid cases, financial constraints continue to trouble parents who may not be able to pay fees. The state had issued a GR in June last year, directing government and aided schools not to insist on TC. Tuesday's GR covers non-state boards such as IB, Cambridge, CBSE, ICSE. The GR has come as a surprise as the academic year is nearing an end and students do not move schools now. School trustees said despite giving 25% to 30% concessions during the two years of the pandemic, parents still have to clear fee dues. "There is no question of admitting a student without a TC as parents will keep moving their children from one school to another without paying fees," said one. A school principal said the state has set up a committee to look into fee-related grievances. "Parents are approaching the committee with their grievances. Now they will simply move their children from one school to another," the principal said. While government and aided schools admitted students last year with the mandatory TC, this year schools refused to admit students without TCs. Parents said in some cases, schools hold back TCs even after fees are paid. "I wanted to change my daughter's school as I did not find the teaching up to the mark. I cleared all the dues yet the school delayed the TC," said a parent who wanted to move from a school in Goregaon. Students have the right to move from one school to another under the Right To Education (RTE) Act. The Bombay high court in March last year directed private unaided schools to not debar students from online or physical classes for non-payment of the increased component of fees for the academic year 2020-21. The state had in May last year barred private unaided schools from hiking fees.

Transfer certificate no longer mandatory for admission to schools in Maharashtra