Maharashtra: School education minister Deepak Kesarkar plans remedial coaching in schools

Times of India | 2 weeks ago | 23-11-2022 | 06:01 am

Maharashtra: School education minister Deepak Kesarkar plans remedial coaching in schools

MUMBAI: School education minister Deepak Kesarkar on Tuesday said that the state will adopt a successful school education model that has been implemented in Kerala. Conducting exams at regular intervals and offering remedial coaching to students who are not doing well and testing them again, upgrading the syllabus every 10 years, and focusing on teaching in the mother tongue are some of the practices in Kerala. Kesarkar said that some of the best practices from other states, including Punjab and Rajasthan, can be adopted here too. He said that the state will now stress on student-focused reforms. Kesarkar said that pre-primary education will soon be brought under the purview of the school education department. During an interaction with the media, Kesarkar said that schools will now return to testing students from class III at regular intervals by holding unit tests, semester-end and final exams. With the 'no-fail' policy prescribed in the Right to Education Act, several schools were following grading systems and did not test students at regular intervals, said a teacher from an aided school. "While no-fail policy will continue, as failing students may lead to dropouts in schools, regular evaluation of students will bring in accountability," said Kesarkar. He said that schools in Kerala come under the gram panchayats. He mentioned that every school in Kerala has a library, which helps in inculcating the reading habit. "Many states are doing well in terms of education. While Maharashtra is a huge state and cannot be compared with Kerala, we can adopt successful models from across the country here," he said. The state has already started the implementation of the National Education Policy (NEP), said Kesarkar. He said leading countries in the world are imparting education in their mother tongue. "In advanced countries like Russia, education is imparted in Russian. In Germany, which is a leading country in terms of technology, education is imparted in the German language. If students learn in their own other tongue, they will comprehend it better. English should definitely be taught, but mother tongue should not be sidelined," he said. The minister said that soon pre-primary schools will be brought under the purview of the school education board. Among other announcements, Kesarkar said that from the next academic session, the school syllabus will be split into three sections and notebooks will be added to the textbooks. The sectional book, with booklets for writing, will have to be changed every three months. A principal said they will have to wait and see the guidelines. He said that private schools used to conduct exams anyway, but there has been no uniformity.

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The Indian Express | 1 hour ago | 08-12-2022 | 02:45 pm
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Dr Farhat Khan, the author of a controversial book, was arrested from Pune in Maharashtra on Thursday while she was undergoing dialysis in a hospital, Madhya Pradesh Home Minister Narottam Mishra said.The arrest was made in connection with her book named ‘Collective Violence and Criminal Justice System’, which was kept in the library of the Government Naveen Law College in Madhya Pradesh’s Indore city.The Akhil Bharatiya Vidyarthi Parishad (ABVP), the student wing of the Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh, has alleged the book being taught to law students has highly objectionable contents against the Hindu community and the RSS.According to police, Khan was suffering from a serious kidney ailment and needed dialysis on a regular basis.“The controversial writer, Farhat Khan, was arrested in Pune when she was undergoing dialysis in a hospital there.Papers (pertaining to the case) were also handed over to her,” Mishra told reporters in Madhya Pradesh capital Bhopal.Authorities have also started a probe into complaints related to another book and if any objectionable content is found, then it will also be linked with the same case, the minister said without elaborating.On December 3, the Indore-based college’s LLM student and ABVP leader Lucky Adiwal (28) filed a complaint against author Khan, the book’s publisher Amar Law Publication, principal of the institution Dr Inam-ur-Rehman and professor Mirza Mojij Baig in the matter.Earlier, an official said the Indore police had traced Khan to Pune and she was served a notice under relevant provisions of the Code of Criminal Procedure (CrPC).“After registering a case five days ago on the issue of the controversial book, we were searching for Dr Frahat Khan and had sent teams to places in Maharashtra and Madhya Pradesh,” Deputy Commissioner of Police (DCP) Rajesh Kumar Singh said.“On the basis of leads, we traced her to Pune and served her a CrPC notice, as per which she was asked to cooperate in the probe and remain present in court at the time of submission of the charge sheet,” he said.The DCP said the Indore-based author was suffering from a serious kidney ailment and needed dialysis on a regular basis.When she went from to Pune from Indore, at that time also she underwent dialysis at a hospital in Sendhwa town on the Maharashtra border, the DCP added.The ABVP had alleged the book contained objectionable content against Hindus, the RSS and promotes religious hatred.The state higher education department had formed a seven-member committee to conduct a probe into the case.A member of the committee said the panel had recorded statements of 250 students and teachers.The higher education department’s commissioner Karmaveer Sharma on Wednesday said the committee has not yet submitted its report.An appropriate action will be taken into the matter on the basis of the probe report, Sharma said.On Tuesday, a local court refused to grant anticipatory bail to the Indore-based law college principal Inam-ur-Rehman and professor Baig, both named as accused in the case.Their lawyer Abhinav Dhanotkar had said the rejection of bail would be challenged in the Indore bench of the Madhya Pradesh High Court.

Controversial book author Farhat Khan arrested from Pune: Madhya Pradesh home minister
Maharashtra: Govt asks universities to offer four-year UG courses in line with NEP
The Indian Express | 4 hours ago | 08-12-2022 | 11:45 am
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Maharashtra: Govt asks universities to offer four-year UG courses in line with NEP
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Times of India | 1 day ago | 07-12-2022 | 07:39 am
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Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation schools record lowest dropouts in 10 years