No sign of October heat this year as sporadic spells of rain continue over Mumbai

The Indian Express | 1 month ago | 07-10-2022 | 02:45 pm

No sign of October heat this year as sporadic spells of rain continue over Mumbai

The October heat is known to be a common phenomenon in Maharashtra’s Mumbai city. From the first week of October every year, several areas in the city become uncomfortably hot with the daily temperature rising and ranging between mid 30 to 35 degrees Celsius.However, the scenario is slightly different this year. With sporadic spells of rain still lashing in several parts of the suburban belt and the island city, there does not seem to be a significant rise in temperature even though the first week of October is nearing its end.Mumbai’s maximum temperature is 30 degrees Celsius on Friday morning, while the average maximum temperature during the day last year varied between 33 degrees and 34 degrees Celsius, according to the Indian Meteorological Department (IMD).Meanwhile, the scientists and weather experts have attributed the current weather condition to the late withdrawal of monsoon from Mumbai and a low pressure developed in the Bay of Bengal.“Monsoon is still there in Mumbai and there is high rate of moisture presence in the air as well. Therefore, light to moderate rainfall will continue in the island city and suburban belt for the next few days since there is no clear forecast of monsoon retreat anytime now. This is directly affecting the daily temperature and as long as the rains are there an increase in temperature is unlikely,” IMD scientist Sushma Nair told The Indian Express.Nair also maintained that a rise in temperature may take place after the monsoon retreats from Mumbai.“After the monsoon withdrawal happens, the temperature may go up till 33 to 34 degrees Celsius, but this will be short-lived since the north-western part of India will start experiencing drop in daily temperature due to the arrival of winter and this will also affect Mumbai as well,” she said.Mahesh Palawat, the chief meteorologist at Skymet Weather, said the entire western and north-western part of India is experiencing an unusual weather pattern this year, which is not letting the temperature rise during October.“Parts of Chhattisgarh, Odisha, Rajasthan and Gujarat are experiencing light to moderate rainfall because of two successive low pressure that have been developed in the Bay of Bengal. There is also a trough seen in the coastal region of Maharashtra. These factors are creating an unusual pattern of rains which is not letting the temperature to rise in Mumbai,” he said.Palawat further said there is a chance of monsoon retreat post October 13.“Light to moderate rainfall will continue in Mumbai till October 12 and Mumbai may experience a slight rise in temperature after October 13,” he added.Meanwhile, the IMD bulletin Friday morning stated the sky will remain cloudy and light to moderate rainfall will continue to lash Mumbai for the next 48 hours. In the past 24 hours, the city has recorded 8.9 mm of rainfall, of which the Santacruz observatory has recorded 1.1 mm of rainfall and the Colaba observatory has recorded 7.8 mm of rainfall.The bulletin stated Mumbai’s relative humidity is 95 per cent.

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New, signal-free corridor will ease Mumbai-Thane traffic woes
Times of India | 5 hours ago | 28-11-2022 | 06:01 am
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THANE: The MMRDA has given its approval to ease congestion at one of the 'world's most chaotic' traffic junctions at Teen Haath Naka by constructing a fresh pair of U-shaped flyovers in addition to the existing bridge that runs above the intersection, officials informed, adding that the project will also ensure the arterial junction could get rid of signals presently required for crossing the intersection. The proposal for the flyovers - with three lanes each and collectively costing approximately Rs 289 crore - was presented before the MMRDA committee last month and finally got administrative approval. Teen Haath Naka is a vital junction on the Mumbai (LBS route)-Thane-Pune-Nashik route where nearly seven roads, including three arterial lanes, converges. A 2014 study commissioned by the Thane corporation had pegged the junction as one of the world's most chaotic ones. Even though the MSRDC had built a flyover over the junction two decades back, it doesn't cater to the rising movement of traffic underneath and between the seven lanes that connect Mumbai-Thane via LBS road with the Eastern Express Highway. According to the plans, a 700m-long, U-shaped flyover will take off from the Nashik lane of the EEH after the Teen Haath Naka junction ends and will run parallel to the existing bridge and then take a turn to the right and land few metres ahead of the junction on the Mumbai-bound carriageway. All vehicles coming from Mumbai and entering Thane city or proceeding towards LBS road or old Pune highway will take this arm without waiting at the signal for crossing over. Similarly, traffic from Nashik, Pune and Thane city headed towards Mumbai using LBS road will ascend the second U-shaped flyover after crossing the junction on the Mumbai-bound lane of the highway. The flyover measuring 900m in length will run parallel to the highway and take a U-turn and land in the opposite direction ahead of the Teen Haath Naka. Officials say once the project is completed, the waiting time at signal for Mumbai, Thane, Nashik, and Pune-bound vehicles will be reduced substantially. The plan entails removing the signals that increase waiting time and often stretches beyond 15-20 minutes. The inclusion of the two U-shaped flyovers at the spot will prove beneficial in smooth management of traffic, especially once the metro station comes up on the stretch. The project may affect a small stretch of green cover between the service road and the highway.

New, signal-free corridor will ease Mumbai-Thane traffic woes