Tamil Nadu reports 1,548 new Covid-19 infections, no deaths

Times of India | 2 weeks ago | 31-07-2022 | 03:09 am

Tamil Nadu reports 1,548 new Covid-19 infections, no deaths

Chennai: Tamil Nadu added 1,548 new Covid-19 cases on Saturday — a drop from 1,624 cases on Friday and 1,712 on Thursday. The state discharged 1,964 patients from the Covid-19 registry, and the number of people in the active cases registry dropped to 13,094 compared to 13,519 on Friday and 13,890 on Thursday. The state reported no new deaths and the cumulative toll tally since March 2020 is 38,032.One passenger from Maharashtra tested positive for Covid-19. Chennai added 345 new cases compared to 353 on Friday and 368 on Thursday. The district continued to report the highest number of cases. Chengalpet reported a fall to 158 new cases, followed by 155 in Coimbatore. All other districts had fewer than 100 new cases each. Erode reported 67cases, Salem had 65, Virudhunagar reported 56 and Thiruvallur reported 52.All 38 districts reported new cases. The lowest number of cases were recorded in Perambalur (2), Thirupathur (3) and Ramanathapuram (3) followed by Kallakurichi (5), Nagapattinam (6), Ariyalur (7), Nilgiris (8) and nine each in Karur and Vellore.Of the 13,094 active cases, there were 4,280 in Chennai, 1,308 in Chengalpet and 1,184 in Coimbatore. Every district in the state had more than 15 patients under isolation. There were 590 patients in the hospital including 204 on oxygen beds and 67 of them in ICUs. Of the 129 patients admitted to hospitals in Chennai, 20 were in the ICU and 43 were on oxygen beds.

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